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Open Access Journal: Palethnologie

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[First posted in AWOL 14 February 2013, updated 27 November  2019]

Palethnologie
ISSN: 2108-6532
Palethnologie
P@lethnologie est la première revue bilingue de préhistoire en ligne (français/anglais). Cette double volonté (support numérique et bilinguisme) est au service de la plus grande diffusion de travaux, en particulier de recherches francophones, auprès d'une large communauté scientifique. L'approche socio-culturelle des populations préhistoriques (celles des chasseurs-cueilleurs, pasteurs et agro-pasteurs) y est développée grâce à la grande diversité des sujets, des contextes géographiques ainsi que des disciplines envisagés : analyse du mobilier archéologique, paléoenvironnement, archéozoologie, art, étude monographique de site... Ces annales proposent, au sein de chaque numéro, un dossier thématique, des contributions sur divers sujets qui composent l'actualité scientifique.
P@lethnologie is the first on-line bilingual (French-English) review of Prehistory. Its digital and bilingual format permits diverse works, particularly research by French speaking authors, to be widely diffused to a broad scientific community. A socio-cultural approach to prehistoric populations (hunter-gatherers, pastoralists and agro-pastoralists) is developed through the inclusion of a broad range of disciplines: archaeological artifact analysis, paleoenvironment, zooarchaeology, art, monographs of site studies, etc. Each issue includes a thematic section, composed of articles presenting recent research.


 

Oracc: The Open Richly Annotated Cuneiform Corpus Projects List

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[First posted 1 July 2010. Most recently updated 27 November 2019]

Oracc: The Open Richly Annotated Cuneiform Corpus Projects List
 Oracc banner
Oracc is a collaborative effort to develop a complete corpus of cuneiform whose rich annotation and open licensing support the next generation of scholarly research. Created by Steve Tinney, Oracc is steered by Jamie Novotny, Eleanor Robson, Tinney, and Niek Veldhuis.

ADsD: Astronomical Diaries Digital

ADsD provides an online edition of the Babylonian Astronomical Diaries. The project is based on the editio princeps prepared by Abraham Sachs and Hermann Hunger, incorporating collations and corrections that were made after publication. ADsD is an outcome of the research grant Astronomical Diaries Digital sponsored by the Austrian Science Funds (FWF), carried out at the Austrian Academy of Sciences (Division: Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities), and led by Reinhard Pirngruber.

adsd/adart1: adsd/Astronomical Diaries and Related Texts 1

ADART 1 contains a searchable edition of the texts published in Sachs and Hunger's Astronomical Diaries and Related Texts from Babylonia, Volume 1: Diaries from 652 B.C. to 262 B.C.

adsd/adart2: adsd/Astronomical Diaries and Related Texts 2

ADART 2 contains a searchable edition of the texts published in Sachs and Hunger's Astronomical Diaries and Related Texts from Babylonia, Volume 2: Diaries from 261 B.C. to 165 B.C.

adsd/adart3: adsd/Astronomical Diaries and Related Texts 3

ADART 3 contains a searchable edition of the texts published in Sachs and Hunger's Astronomical Diaries and Related Texts from Babylonia, Volume 3: Diaries from 164 B.C. to 61 B.C.

aemw/idrimi: Statue of Idrimi

The statue of Idrimi in the British Museum (detail)
An up-to-date, searchable edition of the Idrimi inscription together with numerous annotations and bibliography. By Jacob Lauinger at Johns Hopkins University.

akklove: Akkadian Love Literature

AkkLove presents all early Akkadian literary texts related to love and sex known to date. The project is based on Wasserman, Akkadian Love Literature of the Third and Second Millennium BCE ( LAOS 4), Harrassowitz, 2016, where commentary to the texts and an introduction to the corpus are found.

AMGG: Ancient Mesopotamian Gods and Goddesses

Detail of Old Babylonian clay plaque, known as the Burney Relief or the "Queen of the Night" showing a naked goddess, perhaps Inana or Ereškigal. © The British Museum.
Offers information about the fifty most important Mesopotamian gods and goddesses and provides starting points for further research.
Directed by Nicole Brisch and funded by the UK Higher Education Academy, 2011.

ARIo: Achaemenid Royal Inscriptions online

The project presents annotated and searchable editions of Achaemenid Royal Inscriptions written in Old Persian, Elamite, and Akkadian. The open-access editions are based on Rüdiger Schmitt's Die altpersischen Inschriften der Achaimeniden (2009) and data provided by Dr. Matt Stolper (from his now-defunct Achaemenid Royal Inscriptions project). The texts have been adapted, lemmatized, and translated into English by Henry Heitmann-Gordon. The project is a sub-project of the Munich Open-access Cuneiform Corpus Initiative (MOCCI), based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte), and funded by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

ARMEP: Ancient Records of Middle Eastern Polities

ARMEP, with its multi-project search engine, enables users to simultaneously search the translations, transliterations, and catalogues of multiple Oracc projects on which ancient records of Middle Eastern polities (especially those of the first millennium BC) are edited.
The project is based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte) and funded by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. ARMEP is managed by Jamie Novotny and Karen Radner.

ARRIM Digital Archive: Digital Archive of the Annual Review of the Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia

Through the kind permission of Kirk Grayson and with funding provided by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, ARRIM Digital Archive makes all nine issues of “The Annual Review of the Royal Inscriptions of Mesopotamia" (1983-1991) freely available in searchable PDF files.
This digital archive is based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte) and is managed by Jamie Novotny and Karen Radner.

asbp: Ashurbanipal Library Project

The Ashurbanipal Library Project provides informational pages and a catalogue of texts from Ashurbanipal's library. Future versions of the project will include text editions of the tablets from the library.

blms: Bilinguals in Late Mesopotamian Scholarship

Long after Sumerian had died out as a spoken language, bilingual (Sumerian - Akkadian) texts still played a prominent role in the scholarly culture of Babylonia and Assyria. BLMS provides editions of bilingual narrative texts, hymns, proverbs, prayers, rituals, and incantations dating to the first millennium BCE.
Project Director: Steve Tinney; Editor: Jeremiah Peterson. With the assistance of Niek Veldhuis, Jamie Novotny, Joshua Jeffers, and Ilona Zsolnay. BLMS is supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

CAMS: Corpus of Ancient Mesopotamian Scholarship

Three clay figurines of protective apkallu-sages dressed in fish-cloaks, from 7th-century Nineveh (BM ME 91837)
Editions and translations of a wide range of Mesopotamian scholarly writings, contributed by many different people and projects.

cams/akno: Ancient Knowledge Networks online

Front cover image of Ancient Knowledge Networks
This website is the online complement to Eleanor Robson's book, Ancient Knowledge Networks: a Social Geography of Cuneiform Scholarship in First-Millennium Assyria and Babylonia, published by UCL Press in November 2019. It contains links to translations of cuneiform texts, glossaries, and list of all known scholars of Assyria and Babylonia in the first millennium BC.

CAMS/Anzu

Front cover of State Archives of Assyria, vol. 3
Composite transliterations of the Epic of Anzu, prepared by Amar Annus for the book The Standard Babylonian Epic of Anzu (State Archives of Assyria, Cuneiform Texts 3), Helsinki: The Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project, 2001. Lemmatisation by Philip Jones.
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

CAMS/Barutu

The obverse of the Old Babylonian liver model BM 92668.
Texts on extispicy (divination by the entrails of sacrificed animals). Currently contains only the Old Babylonian liver model BM 92668. The ordering of the omens was determined by Ruth Horry, the transliteration and translation made by Eleanor Robson.

CAMS/Etana: The Standard Babylonian Epic of Etana

Provides fully searchable manuscript transliterations of the Old Babylonian, Middle Assyrian and Neo-Assyrian versions of the Etana epic, prepared by Jamie Novotny for the book The Standard Babylonian Etana Epic (State Archives of Assyria, Cuneiform Texts 2), Helsinki: The Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project, 2001.
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns

CAMS/GKAB: CAMS Geography of Knowledge Corpus

Drawing of a detail from a tablet describing how to make a ritual kettle drum from a bull's hide, Uruk c.200 BC (TCL 6, 47)
Editions of scholarly tablets from Huzirina, Kalhu, and Uruk for the Geography of Knowledge project, comprising editions and translations of a wide range of Mesopotamian scholarly writings.
Project directed by Eleanor Robson at the University of Cambridge and funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council, 2007-12.

CAMS/Ludlul

Front cover of State Archives of Assyria, vol. 7
Score and manuscript transliterations of Ludlul bēl nēmeqi, prepared by Amar Annus and Alan Lenzi for the book Ludlul Bēl Nēmeqi: The Standard Babylonian Poem of the Righteous Sufferer(State Archives of Assyria, Cuneiform Texts 7), Helsinki: The Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project, 2010.
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

CAMS/SelBI: CAMS/Seleucid Building Inscriptions

Close-up of lapis-coloured glazed bricks in the remains of the Irigal temple in Uruk, 2001. Photo by Eleanor Robson.
Third-century BC building inscriptions, from Borsippa and Uruk. Edition of the Antiochus (Borsippa) Cylinder by Kathryn Stevens; edition of the Anu-uballiṭs' inscriptions from Uruk by Eleanor Robson.

HIST3109: Temple Life in Assyria and Babylonia

Imaginary reconstruction of the Etemenanki ziggurat in Babylon
Editions and translations of texts for the UCL Undergraduate Special Subject in History, Temple Life in Assyria and Babylonia (HIST3109), academic year 2018-19. Compiled by Eleanor Robson at UCL.

CASPo: Corpus of Akkadian Shuila-Prayers online

Shu-il2-la2
"Corpus of Akkadian Shuila Prayers Online" is an on-going project that provides a digital resource for these important Akkadian prayers and lays the foundation for a comprehensive critical edition. Alan Lenzi, professor at University of the Pacific (Stockton, CA), leads the project.

CCPo: Cuneiform Commentaries Project on ORACC

Provides fully searchable, annotated editions of text commentaries written by Assyrian and Babylonian scholars between the eighth and second centuries BCE. The texts commented on include literary, magical, divinatory, medical, legal, and lexical works.
Project Director: Eckart Frahm; Co-Director: Enrique Jiménez; Senior Editor: Mary Frazer.

CDLI: The Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative

CDLI image of Proto-Cuneiform tablet from Uruk, W20367
The foundational online cataloging and archiving project for the cuneiform corpus, directed by Bob Englund at UCLA. The Oracc presentation is based directly on public CDLI data which is updated nightly.

CKST: Corpus of Kassite Sumerian Texts

Votive eye dedicated by the Kassite king Kurigalzu to the god Zababa. (Louvre, AO 23994)
Editions of Sumerian Kassite texts: Royal Inscriptions, Literary, and Lexical texts.

CMAwRo: Corpus of Mesopotamian Anti-witchcraft Rituals

Head of an Assyrian woman (© Trustees of the British Museum)
CMAwRo presents online critical editions of Mesopotamian rituals and incantations against witchcraft.

The DFG-funded research project "Corpus babylonischer Rituale und Beschwörungen gegen Schadenzauber: Edition, lexikalische Erschließung, historische und literarische Analyse" is directed by Daniel Schwemer (University of Würzburg).

CMAwRo 1: Corpus of Mesopotamian Anti-witchcraft Rituals, vol. 1

Cover of CMAwR 1
CMAwRo 1 presents online the text editions and translations from Tzvi Abusch and Daniel Schwemer, Corpus of Mesopotamian Anti-witchcraft Rituals, vol. 1 (Ancient Magic and Divination 8/1, Brill: 2011).
The volume was lemmatized by Mikko Luukko as part of the DFG-funded research project "Corpus babylonischer Rituale und Beschwörungen gegen Schadenzauber: Edition, lexikalische Erschließung, historische und literarische Analyse", directed by Daniel Schwemer (University of Würzburg).
Buy the book from Brill

CMAwRo 2: Corpus of Mesopotamian Anti-witchcraft Rituals, vol. 2

Cover of CMAwR 2
CMAwRo 2 presents online the text editions and translations from Tzvi Abusch, Daniel Schwemer, Mikko Luukko and Greta Van Buylaere, Corpus of Mesopotamian Anti-witchcraft Rituals, vol. 2 (Ancient Magic and Divination 8/2, Brill: 2016).
The volume was lemmatized by Mikko Luukko and Greta Van Buylaere as part of the DFG-funded research project "Corpus babylonischer Rituale und Beschwörungen gegen Schadenzauber: Edition, lexikalische Erschließung, historische und literarische Analyse", directed by Daniel Schwemer (University of Würzburg).
Buy the book from Brill

cmawro/cmawr3: cmawro/CMAwRo 3

Maqlû

Cover of Tzvi Abusch, Maqlû
Maqlû presents online the text editions and translations from Tzvi Abusch, The Magical Ceremony Maqlû: A Critical Edition (Ancient Magic and Divination 10, Brill: 2015).
The volume was lemmatized by Mikko Luukko and Greta Van Buylaere as part of the DFG-funded research project "Corpus babylonischer Rituale und Beschwörungen gegen Schadenzauber: Edition, lexikalische Erschließung, historische und literarische Analyse", directed by Daniel Schwemer (University of Würzburg).
Buy the book from Brill

Contrib: Contributions

Data contributed to Oracc for reuse by others, normally under the CC BY-SA license.

Amarna: The Amarna Texts

Shrine-stela of Amenhotep III and queen Tiye (detail), Amarna c.1340 BC. (British Museum EA 57399)
Contributed by Shlomo Izre'el, the Amarna corpus comprises transliterations of the 380 cuneiform tablets found at Tell el-Amarna (ancient Akhetaten) in Egypt. It contains diplomatic correspondence and Akkadian scholarly works from the mid-14th century BC.

contrib/lambert: The Notebooks of W.G. Lambert

Image of part of Lambert Folio 9034, the first page of Notebook 2
W. G. Lambert (1926-2011) was an Assyriologist who spent much of his research time transliterating and copying cuneiform tablets in museums, especially the British Museum. His Nachlass included eight notebooks filled with handwritten transliterations of Babylonian and Assyrian texts. The notebooks contain more than five thousand transliterations, spread over nearly fifteen hundred pages. They are an astonishing record of sustained first-hand engagement with cuneiform tablets.

CTIJ: Cuneiform Texts Mentioning Israelites, Judeans, and Other Related Groups

Judean captives leaving the city of Lachish to exile, ca. 701 BC.
Cuneiform texts and onomastic data pertaining to Israelites, Judeans, and related population groups during the Neo-Assyrian, Neo- and Late Babylonian, and Achaemenid Periods (744-330 BCE).
Project directed by Ran Zadok and Yoram Cohen, and funded by the "Ancient Israel" (New Horizons) Research Program of Tel Aviv University.

DCCLT: Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Lexical Texts

Drawing of a list of vessels from Archaic Uruk, circa 3500 BCE
Editions and translations of lexical texts (word lists and sign lists) from all periods of cuneiform writing
Project directed by Niek Veldhuis at UC Berkeley and supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

DCCLT/ebla: DCCLT/Ebla Lexical Texts

Decorations from the palace at Ebla
Editions and translation of the unilingual and bilingual lexical texts from Ebla (ca. 2300 BCE). The editions were prepared by Marco Bonechi (Rome) and transformed for publication in DCCLT by Niek Veldhuis.

dcclt/Jena: dcclt/Lexical Texts in the Hilprecht Collection, Jena

Editions and translation of lexical texts from Nippur now in the Frau Professor Hilprecht Collection of the Friedrich Schiller University Jena. Editions by John Carnahan and Niek Veldhuis (Berkeley) with the assistance of Jay Chrisostomo (Ann Arbor), Kai Lämmerhirt, and Manfred Krebernik (Jena). Supported by a Mellon Project Grant of the Division of Arts and Humanities of the University of California at Berkeley.

DCCLT/Nineveh: DCCLT/Lexical Texts in the Royal Libraries at Nineveh

Horned bull and archaizing sign list.
Nineveh provides editions of the lexical texts in the royal tablet collections discovered in the Assyrian capital. The project is supported by the NEH and was carried out in cooperation with the British Museum.

DCCLT/signlists: DCCLT/Reading the Signs

Editions and translations of all cuneiform sign lists from the middle of the third millennium B.C.E. until the end of cuneiform culture. The project is supported by the NEH.
Project directed by Niek Veldhuis. Editions by Emmanuelle Salgues, C. Jay Crisostomo, and John Carnahan.

DCCMT: Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Mathematical Texts

Photo of an Old Babylonian school exercise on calculating the area of a triangle (Ashmolean 1931.91)
Catalogue of around a thousand published cuneiform mathematical tablets, with several hundred transliterations and translations.
Project run by Eleanor Robson at the University of Cambridge.

eCUT: Electronic Corpus of Urartian Texts

The project presents fully annotated and searchable editions of numerous cuneiform sources from the Kingdom of Urartu, which are mainly written in the Urartian language. The open-access editions are based on Mirjo Salvini's Corpus dei testi urartei (CTU) I-V (2008-2018) and they have been adapted, revised, lemmatized, and translated into English by Birgit Christiansen. The project is a sub-project of the Munich Open-access Cuneiform Corpus Initiative (MOCCI), based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte), and funded by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

ePSD2/ISSL: ePSD2/Index to the Sumerian Secondary Literature

Over 70,000 references to the Sumerian secondary literature which also indexes all of the transliterations of word writings in ePSD2.

ETCSRI: Electronic Text Corpus of Sumerian Royal Inscriptions

Sculpted head of Gudea of Lagash with turban in the Louvre (AO 13). Photo by Gábor Zólyomi
An annotated, grammatically and morphologically analyzed, transliterated, trilingual (Sumerian-English-Hungarian), parallel corpus of all Sumerian royal inscriptions.
Directed by Gábor Zólyomi at Eötvos Loránd University, Budapest and funded by the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (OTKA).

Glass: Corpus of Glass Technological Texts

This project provides editions and translations for cuneiform technological recipes. The texts include Assyrian and Babylonian tablets that provide instructions for producing glass that imitates precious stones and procedures for processing perfumed oils. Directed by Eduardo A. Escobar at UC Berkeley

HBTIN: Hellenistic Babylonia: Texts, Iconography, Names

   A personal seal stamped into a cuneiform tablet from Hellenistic Uruk (BM 105203, detail).
Cuneiform texts, iconography and onomastic data from Hellenistic Babylonia, primarily from Uruk. HBTIN texts form the demonstrator corpus of the Berkeley Prosopography Service (BPS).
Directed by Laurie Pearce at UC Berkeley.

ISSL: The Index to the Sumerian Secondary Literature

Over 70,000 references to the Sumerian secondary literature which also indexes all of the transliterations of word writings in ePSD.

LaOCOST: Law and Order: Cuneiform Online Sustainable Tool

This project illuminates how issues of law and gender were practiced in the ancient Near East, utilizing a digital corpus of legal and non-legal texts as its database. LaOCOST is directed by Ilan Peled.

LoveLyrics: A corpus of 1st mill. love rituals involving Marduk, Zarpanitum and Ištar

Edition of the corpus of 1st-millennium-BCE texts from Assyria and Babylonia with rituals and verbal ceremonies involving Marduk, Zarpanitu and Ištar of Babylon. By Rocío Da Riva (Universitat de Barcelona) and Nathan Wasserman (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem).
Photo: Clay plaque (87.160.79) depicting a goddess lying on a wedding bed, probably Ištar. © The Israel Museum, Jerusalem.

Nimrud: Nimrud: Materialities of Assyrian Knowledge Production

The Assyrian city of Nimrud, as re-imagined by its first excavator, Austen Henry Layard (detail).
A portal to all things related to the ancient Assyrian city of Nimrud (Kalhu/Calah), on Oracc and beyond. Explores how scientific and historical knowledge is made from archaeological objects.
Directed by Eleanor Robson at the University of Cambridge and funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council.

OBMC: Old Babylonian Model Contracts

OBMC Logo
Edition of the Corpus of Old Babylonian Model Contracts by Gabriella Spada.

OBTA: Old Babylonian Tabular Accounts

Photo of southern Iraqi farm by ER
A catalogue and corpus of Old Babylonian tabular accounts by Eleanor Robson at University College London. Additions and corrections welcome.

OGSL: Oracc Global Sign List

LAK 25, from A. Deimel, Liste der Archaische Keilschriftzeichen.
Provides a global registry of sign names, variants and readings for use by Oracc.
Managed by Niek Veldhuis at UC Berkeley.

OIMEA: Official Inscriptions of the Middle East in Antiquity

OIMEA, with its multi-project search engine, enables users to simultaneously search the translations, transliterations, and catalogues of multiple Oracc projects on which official inscriptions are edited.
The project is based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte) and funded by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. OIMEA is managed by Jamie Novotny and Karen Radner.

PNAo: Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire online

Cover of PNA 3/II
Provides a collection of additions and corrections to the printed fascicles of The Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire. A separate section is devoted to new information about Neo-Assyrian eponym officials. Compiled by Heather D. Baker at the University of Toronto.

Qcat: The Q Catalogue

The letter Q; icon of the Orac Qcat project.
Provides a global registry of compositions rather than objects, supporting the creation of scores on Oracc.
Managed by Eleanor Robson at the University of Cambridge.

RIAo: Royal Inscriptions of Assyria online

This project intends to present annotated editions of the entire corpus of Assyrian royal inscriptions, texts that were published in RIMA 1-3 and RINAP 1 and 3-4. This rich, open-access corpus has been made available through the kind permission of Kirk Grayson and Grant Frame and with funding provided by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.
RIAo is based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte) and is managed by Jamie Novotny and Karen Radner. Kirk Grayson, Nathan Morello, and Jamie Novotny are the primary content contributors.

RIBo: Royal Inscriptions of Babylonia online

This project intends to present annotated editions of the entire corpus of Babylonian royal inscriptions from the Second Dynasty of Isin to the Neo-Babylonian Dynasty (1157-539 BC). This rich, open-access corpus has been made available through the kind permission of Rocío Da Riva and Grant Frame and with funding provided by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.
RIBo is based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte) and is managed by Jamie Novotny and Karen Radner. Alexa Bartelmus, Rocío Da Riva, Grant Frame, and Jamie Novotny are the primary content contributors.

Scores: Scores of the Inscriptions of the Neo-Babylonian Dynasty

This sub-project presently includes score transliterations of the official inscriptions of Nabopolassar and Neriglissar. The ‘Babylon 7 Scores’ project will also include the scores of the royal inscriptions of Nebuchadnezzar II and Nabonidus.
Jamie Novotny adapted the scores contributed by Rocío Da Riva, which she had published in her The Inscriptions of Nabopolassar, Amel-Marduk and Neriglissar (SANER 3).

Babylon 10: The Borsippa Inscription of Antiochus I Soter

This sub-project includes an edition of the Borsippa Inscription of Antiochus I Soter (281-261 BC).
Kathryn Stevens contributed the lemmatized edition; Jamie Novotny made minor stylistic changes to the edition and lemmatization.

Babylon 2: The Inscriptions of the Second Dynasty of Isin

This sub-project includes editions of the official inscriptions of the Second Dynasty of Isin (ca. 1157-1026 BC), texts published in Frame, RIMB 2 pp. 5-69.
Grant Frame contributed the transliterations and translations and Alexa Bartelmus updated and lemmatized the editions.

Babylon 3: The Inscriptions of the Second Dynasty of the Sealand

This sub-project includes editions of the official inscriptions of the Second Dynasty of the Sealand (ca. 1025-1005 BC), texts published in Frame, RIMB 2 pp. 70-77.
Grant Frame contributed the transliterations and translations and Alexa Bartelmus updated and lemmatized the editions.

Babylon 4: The Inscriptions of the Bazi Dynasty

This sub-project includes editions of the official inscriptions of the Bazi Dynasty (ca. 1004-985 BC), texts published in Frame, RIMB 2 pp. 78-86.
Grant Frame contributed the transliterations and translations and Alexa Bartelmus updated and lemmatized the editions.

Babylon 5: The Inscriptions of the Elamite Dynasty

This sub-project includes editions of the official inscriptions of the Elamite Dynasty (ca. 984-979 BC), texts published in Frame, RIMB 2 pp. 87-89.
Grant Frame contributed the transliterations and translations and Alexa Bartelmus updated and lemmatized the editions.

Babylon 6: The Inscriptions of the Period of the Uncertain Dynasties

This sub-project includes editions of the official inscriptions of the the Period of the Uncertain Dynasties "Uncertain Dynasties" (978-626 BC), texts published in Frame, RIMB 2 pp. 5-69 and Leichty, RINAP 4.
Grant Frame and Erle Leichty contributed the transliterations and translations and Alexa Bartelmus and Jamie Novotny updated and lemmatized the editions.

Babylon 7: The Inscriptions of the Neo-Babylonian Dynasty

This sub-project presently includes editions of some of the official inscriptions of the Neo-Babylonian Dynasty (625-539 BC), texts of Nabopolassar, Amēl-Marduk, Neriglissar, and Nabonidus published by Da Riva and Schaudig. The ‘Babylon 7’ project will also include the inscriptions of Nebuchadnezzar II.
Frauke Weiershäuser and Jamie Novotny adapted the editions of Da Riva and Schaudig, as well as lemmatized the inscriptions. In addition, Alexa Bartelmus prepared some of the informational pages.

Babylon 8: The Inscriptions of Cyrus II and His Successors

This sub-project presently includes editions of three of Akkadian inscriptions of the Persian ruler Cyrus II (559-530 BC). The ‘Babylon 8’ project will eventually include other Akkadian, Elamite, and Old Persian inscriptions of Cyrus II and his successors.
Alexa Bartelmus and Jamie Novotny adapted the editions from I. Finkel, The Cyrus Cylinder. The King of Persia's Proclamation from Ancient Babylon and H. Schaudig, Die Inschriften Nabonids von Babylon und Kyros' des Großen.

Sources: Sources for Inscriptions of the Rulers of Babylonia

This sub-project presently includes object transliterations of the inscriptions of Nabopolassar, Amēl-Marduk, and Neriglissar. The ‘Sources’ project intends to include the transliterations of all of the objects inscribed with inscriptions from the Second Dynasty of Isin to the Neo-Babylonian Dynasty (1157-539 BC).

Rīm-Anum: The House of Prisoners

Rīm-Anum, king of Uruk (ca. 1741–1739 BC) revolted against Samsuiluna of Babylon, son of Hammurapi, and enjoyed a short-lived independence. The archive edited in this project derives from the house of prisoners (bīt asiri) that kept the prisoners of war. The editions and translations were prepared by Andrea Seri and accompanies her book "The House of Prisoners" (2013).
Buy the bookfrom Harrassowitz.

RINAP: Royal Inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Period

Excavating the Ninurta temple at Kalhu (Nimrud). Watercolor by F.C. Cooper.
Presents fully searchable, annotated editions of the royal inscriptions of Neo-Assyrian kings Tiglath-pileser III (744-727 BC), Shalmaneser V (726-722 BC), Sargon II (721-705 BC), Sennacherib (704-681 BC), and Esarhaddon (680-669 BC).
Directed by Grant Frame at the University of Pennsylvania and funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

RINAP 1: Tiglath-pileser III and Shalmaneser V

Cover image of RINAP 1
The official inscriptions of Tiglath-pileser III (744-727 BC) and Shalmaneser V (726-722 BC), kings of Assyria, edited by Hayim Tadmor and Shigeo Yamada.
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

RINAP 3: Sennacherib

Cover image of RINAP 3
The official inscriptions of Sennacherib (704-681 BC), king of Assyria, edited by A. Kirk Grayson and Jamie Novotny.
Buy Part 1 and/or Part 2 from Eisenbrauns.

RINAP 4: Esarhaddon

Cover of RINAP 4, published by Eisenbrauns
The official inscriptions of Esarhaddon, king of Assyria (680-669 BC), edited by Erle Leichty.
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

RINAP 5: Ashurbanipal and Successors

The official inscriptions of the Assyrian kings Ashurbanipal (668–ca. 631 BC), Aššur-etel-ilāni (ca. 631–627/626 BC), and Sîn-šarra-iškun (627/626–612 BC), edited by Jamie Novotny, Joshua Jeffers, and Grant Frame.
Buy Part 1 from Eisenbrauns.

RINAP Scores

This sub-project of RINAP Online includes all fifty-five of the score transliterations published by the RINAP Project (2011-14).

RINAP Sources

This sub-project of RINAP Online includes transliterations of the available sources of the editions published by the RINAP Project (2011-15).

SAAo: State Archives of Assyria Online

A pair of Assyrian scribes filing reports after the conquest of a Babylonian city, Nimrud, 8th century BC (BM ANE 118882)
The online counterpart to the State Archives of Assyria series, released with the kind permission of The Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project and its director Professor Simo Parpola.
Associated portal sites include Knowledge and Power and Assyrian Empire Builders.

Knowledge and Power

An Assyrian king with his scribes and scholars, as imagined    in the mid-19th century. (A.H. Layard, A Second Series of the Monuments    of Nineveh, London 1853, pl. 2 detail, after a sketch by J.    Fergusson).
Presents Neo-Assyrian scholars' letters, queries, and reports to their kings in seventh-century Nineveh and provides resources to support their use in undergraduate teaching.
Directed by Karen Radner at University College London and Eleanor Robson at the University of Cambridge; funded by the UK Higher Education Academy, 2007-10.

SAAo/SAA01: The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part I: Letters from Assyria and the West

Cover of published volume S. Parpola, The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part I: Letters from Assyria and the West (1987)
The text editions from the book S. Parpola, The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part I: Letters from Assyria and the West (State Archives of Assyria, 1), 1987 (2015 reprint).
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

SAAo/SAA02: Neo-Assyrian Treaties and Loyalty Oaths

Cover of published volume S. Parpola and K. Watanabe, Neo-Assyrian Treaties and Loyalty Oaths (1988)
The text editions from the book S. Parpola and K. Watanabe, Neo-Assyrian Treaties and Loyalty Oaths (State Archives of Assyria, 2), 1988 (reprint 2014).
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

SAAo/SAA03: Court Poetry and Literary Miscellanea

Cover of published volume A. Livingstone, Court Poetry and Literary Miscellanea (1989)
The text editions from the book A. Livingstone, Court Poetry and Literary Miscellanea (State Archives of Assyria, 3), 1989 (2014 reprint).
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

SAAo/SAA04: Queries to the Sungod: Divination and Politics in Sargonid Assyria

Cover of published volume I. Starr, Queries to the Sungod: Divination and Politics in Sargonid Assyria (1990)
The text editions from the book I. Starr, Queries to the Sungod: Divination and Politics in Sargonid Assyria (State Archives of Assyria, 4), 1990.
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

SAAo/SAA05: The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part II: Letters from the Northern and Northeastern Provinces

Cover of published volume G. B. Lanfranchi and S. Parpola, The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part II: Letters from the Northern and Northeastern Provinces (1990)
The text editions from the book G. B. Lanfranchi and S. Parpola, The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part II: Letters from the Northern and Northeastern Provinces (State Archives of Assyria, 5), 1990 (2014 reprint).
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

SAAo/SAA06: Legal Transactions of the Royal Court of Nineveh, Part I: Tiglath-Pileser III through Esarhaddon

Cover of published volume T. Kwasman and S. Parpola, Legal Transactions of the Royal Court of Nineveh, Part I: Tiglath-Pileser III through Esarhaddon (1991)
The text editions from the book T. Kwasman and S. Parpola, Legal Transactions of the Royal Court of Nineveh, Part I: Tiglath-Pileser III through Esarhaddon (State Archives of Assyria, 6), 1991.
Out of print.

SAAo/SAA07: Imperial Administrative Records, Part I: Palace and Temple Administration

Cover of published volume F. M. Fales and J. N. Postgate, Imperial Administrative Records, Part I: Palace and Temple Administration (1992)
The text editions from the book F. M. Fales and J. N. Postgate, Imperial Administrative Records, Part I: Palace and Temple Administration (State Archives of Assyria, 7), 1992 (2014 reprint).
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

SAAo/SAA08: Astrological Reports to Assyrian Kings

Cover of published volume H. Hunger, Astrological Reports to Assyrian Kings (1992)
The text editions from the book H. Hunger, Astrological Reports to Assyrian Kings (State Archives of Assyria, 8), 1992 (2014 reprint).
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

SAAo/SAA09: Assyrian Prophecies

Cover of published volume S. Parpola, Assyrian Prophecies (1997)
The text editions from the book S. Parpola, Assyrian Prophecies (State Archives of Assyria, 9), 1997.
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

SAAo/SAA10: Letters from Assyrian and Babylonian Scholars

Cover of published volume S. Parpola, Letters from Assyrian and Babylonian Scholars (1993)
The text editions from the book S. Parpola, Letters from Assyrian and Babylonian Scholars (State Archives of Assyria, 10), 1993 (2014 reprint).
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

SAAo/SAA11: Imperial Administrative Records, Part II: Provincial and Militar Administration

Cover of published volume F. M. Fales and J. N. Postgate, Imperial Administrative Records, Part II: Provincial and Military Administration (1995)
The text editions from the book F. M. Fales and J. N. Postgate, Imperial Administrative Records, Part II: Provincial and Military Administration (State Archives of Assyria, 11), 1995.
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

SAAo/SAA12: Grants, Decres and Gifts of the Neo-Assyrian Period

Cover of published volume L. Kataja and R. Whiting, Grants, Decrees and Gifts of the Neo-Assyrian Period (1995)
The text editions from the book L. Kataja and R. Whiting, Grants, Decrees and Gifts of the Neo-Assyrian Period (State Archives of Assyria, 12), 1995.
Out of print.

SAAo/SAA13: Letters from Assyrian and Babylonian Priests to Kings Esarhaddon and Assurbanipal

Cover of published volume S. W. Cole and P. Machinist, Letters from Assyrian and Babylonian Priests to Kings Esarhaddon and Assurbanipal (1998)
The text editions from the book S. W. Cole and P. Machinist, Letters from Assyrian and Babylonian Priests to Kings Esarhaddon and Assurbanipal (State Archives of Assyria, 13), 1998 (reprint 2014).
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

SAAo/SAA14: Legal Transactions of the Royal Court of Nineveh, Part II: Assurbanipal Through Sin-šarru-iškun

Cover of published volume R. Mattila, Legal Transactions of the Royal Court of Nineveh, Part II: Assurbanipal Through Sin-šarru-iškun (2002)
The text editions from the book R. Mattila, Legal Transactions of the Royal Court of Nineveh, Part II: Assurbanipal Through Sin-šarru-iškun (State Archives of Assyria, 14), 2002.
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

SAAo/SAA15: The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part III: Letters from Babylonia and the Eastern Provinces

Cover of published volume A. Fuchs and S. Parpola, The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part III: Letters from Babylonia and the Eastern Provinces (2001)
The text editions from the book A. Fuchs and S. Parpola, The Correspondence of Sargon II, Part III: Letters from Babylonia and the Eastern Provinces (State Archives of Assyria, 15), 2001.
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

SAAo/SAA16: The Political Correspondence of Esarhaddon

Cover of published volume M. Luukko and G. Van Buylaere, The Political Correspondence of Esarhaddon (2002)
The text editions from the book M. Luukko and G. Van Buylaere, The Political Correspondence of Esarhaddon (State Archives of Assyria, 16), 2002.
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

SAAo/SAA17: The Neo-Babylonian Correspondence of Sargon and Sennacherib

Cover of published volume M. Dietrich, The Neo-Babylonian Correspondence of Sargon and Sennacherib (2003)
The text editions from the book M. Dietrich, The Neo-Babylonian Correspondence of Sargon and Sennacherib (State Archives of Assyria, 17), 2003.
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

SAAo/SAA18: The Babylonian Correspondence of Esarhaddon and Letters to Assurbanipal and Sin-šarru-iškun from Northern and Central Babylonia

Cover of published volume F. S. Reynolds, The Babylonian Correspondence of Esarhaddon and Letters to Assurbanipal and Sin-šarru-iškun from Northern and Central Babylonia (2003)
The text editions from the book F. S. Reynolds, The Babylonian Correspondence of Esarhaddon and Letters to Assurbanipal and Sin-šarru-iškun from Northern and Central Babylonia (State Archives of Assyria, 18), 2003.
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

SAAo/SAA19: The Correspondence of Tiglath-Pileser III and Sargon II from Calah/Nimrud

Cover of published volume SAA 19
The text editions from the book Mikko Luukko, The Correspondence of Tiglath-Pileser III and Sargon II from Calah/Nimrud (State Archives of Assyria, 19), 2013.
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

SAAo/SAA20: Assyrian Royal Rituals and Cultic Texts

Cover of published volume SAA 20
The text editions from the book Simo Parpola, Assyrian Royal Rituals and Cultic Texts (State Archives of Assyria, 20), 2017.
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

SAAo/SAA21: The Correspondence of Assurbanipal, Part I: Letters from Assyria, Babylonia, and Vassal States

The text editions from the book Simo Parpola, The Correspondence of Assurbanipal, Part I: Letters from Assyria, Babylonia, and Vassal States (State Archives of Assyria, 21), 2018.
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

SAAo/SAAS2: SAAo/Assyrian Eponym List

Cover of published volume A. Millard, The Eponyms of the Assyrian Empire, 910-612 BC (1994)
The text editions and composite translation from the book A. Millard, The Eponyms of the Assyrian Empire, 910-612 BC (State Archives of Assyria Studies 2), 1994 (2014 reprint).
Buy the book from Eisenbrauns.

Suhu: The Inscriptions of Suhu online

This project presents annotated editions of the officially commissioned texts of the extant, first-millennium-BC inscriptions of the rulers of Suhu, texts published in Frame, RIMB 2 pp. 275-331. The open-access transliterations and translations were made available through the kind permission of Grant Frame and with funding provided by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.
Suhu online is based at LMU Munich (Historisches Seminar, Alte Geschichte) and is managed by Jamie Novotny and Karen Radner. Alexa Bartelmus and Grant Frame are the primary content contributors.

Xcat: The X Catalogue

The X logo of XCat
Provides a global registry of cuneiform manuscripts, supplementary to CDLI.
Managed by Eleanor Robson at the University of Cambridge.

Open Access Journal: Classica et Mediaevalia: Danish Journal of Philology and History

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 [First posted in AWOL 5 February 2013, updated 27 November 2019]

Classica et Mediaevalia: Danish Journal of Philology and History
ISSN 0106-5815
ISSN 1604-9411 (Online)
Page Header Logo
Classica et Mediaevalia encourages scholarly contributions covering the fields of Greek and Latin languages and literature up to, and including the late middle ages as well as Graeco-Roman history and traditions as manifested in general history, history of law, history of philosophy and ecclesiastical history. General linguistics, archaeology and the history of art are not usually dealt with.
Classica et Mediaevalia is a peer-reviewed annual online journal (January) which provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.
Classica et Mediaevalia (vol. 67, 2019) 
Classica et Mediaevalia (vol. 66)
Table of contents
Kristoffer Maribo Engell Larsen: "Aphrodite and Inanna: The Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite and Sumerian Poetry on Inanna"

M. Carmen Encinas Reguero: "Rhetoric in Classical Athens: The Recognition Scene in Aeschylus'Choephoroi and in Sophocles' and Euripides'Electra"

Janek Kucharski: "Matricide and Silence in Sophocles'Electra"

Charles Pry: "The Artist as Critic? Some Notes on the Portrayal of the Athenian Warmaking in the Plays of Euripides"

Benjamin Pedersen: "Callisthenes and the Creation of a Homeric Hero"

Katerina Philippides: "Altars and Temples in Plautine Comedy"

Nick Geller: "Rhetoric's "Cure": The Sublime τέχνη of Longinus"

Keith R. Bradley: Artemidorus and the Dreams of Slaves"

Marc Steinmann: "Eine fiktive Depesche der Gymnosophisten an Alexander den Großen: Die Epistula Bragmanorum ad Alexandrum als Einleitung zu einer moralisch-ethnographischen Epitome" Willum Westenholz: "Sidonius as an Auctor in the Middle Ages"

Stavroula Constantinou: "The Saint's Two Bodies: Sensibility under (self-)Torture in Byzantine Hagiography

Vasileios Pappas: "Justin Neograecus: The Translation of Epitome of Philippics by Daniel Philippides"

Heta Björklund: "A Note on the Aspects of the Greek Child-Killing Demon"
Classica et Mediaevalia (vol. 65) 
Classica et Mediaevalia (vol. 64)
Classica et Mediaevalia (vol. 63)
Classica et Mediaevalia (vol. 62)
Classica et Mediaevalia (vol. 61)
Classica et Mediaevalia (vol. 60)
Classica et Mediaevalia (vol. 60) 
 The following volumes have TOC and abstracts only
Classica et Mediaevalia (vol. 58) 
Classica et Mediaevalia (vol. 57) 
Classica et Mediaevalia (vol. 56) 
Classica et Mediaevalia (vol. 55) 
Classica et Mediaevalia (vol. 54) 
Classica et Mediaevalia (vol. 53)

Open Access Journal: Abstracta Iranica

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 [First posted in AWOL 28 February 2014, updated 28 November 2019]

Abstracta Iranica
Couverture Abstracta Iranica - Volume 32-33
Revue de bibliographie sélective et critique pour le monde irano-aryen sur tous les aspects de la culture et de la civilisation iraniennes, des origines à nos jours

A selective and critical bibliographical journal of Iranian studies, also covering Afghanistan and other areas relevant to Iranian culture

چکیده‌های ایرانشناسی یک نشریه کتابشناسی گزیده و انتقادی است از پژوهشهای مربوط به همهً زمینه‌های فرهنگ و تمدن ایرانی‌ از آغاز تا امروز.

Abstracta Iranica est une revue de bibliographie sélective et critique pour le monde irano-aryen ; elle rend compte des travaux concernant tous les aspects de la culture et de la civilisation iraniennes, des origines à nos jours.

Les travaux présentés dans Abstracta Iranica sont sélectionnés parmi les publications de l’année précédente, et présentés par des chercheurs.

Les auteurs et maisons d’édition sont invités à adresser à la Rédaction les ouvrages et tirés-à-part des articles destinés à faire l’objet d’un compte rendu dans la revue.

De Samarcande à Istanbul : étapes orientales: Hommages à Pierre Chuvin - II

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De Samarcande à Istanbul : étapes orientales: Hommages à Pierre Chuvin - II
Véronique Schiltz (dir.)
De Samarcande à Istanbul : étapes orientales
  • Éditeur : CNRS Éditions
  • Collection : Histoire
  • Lieu d’édition : Paris
  • Année d’édition : 2015
  • Publication sur OpenEdition Books : 28 novembre 2019
  • EAN (Édition imprimée) : 9782271083203
  • EAN électronique : 9782271130464
  • Nombre de pages : 466 p.
Grand helléniste, arpenteur de terres et de textes, Pierre Chuvin double son érudition académique de professeur des Universités d'un intérêt vivant pour les mondes de l'Asie centrale et de la Turquie sous leurs aspects les plus divers. Ainsi a-t-il fondé et dirigé l'Institut français d'études sur l'Asie centrale (1993-1998), avant de prendre la tête de l'Institut d'études anatoliennes (2003-2008).
Succédant à un premier recueil d'hommages consacré au monde grec du mythos au logos, le présent volume rassemble des contributions consacrées à l'Orient centrasiatique et turc. Leur diversité est à l'image de la curiosité inlassable de celui auquel elles sont dédiées.
Des mausolées de Samarcande à la Sublime Porte, de l'Antiquité à l'époque contemporaine, de l'écrit à l'image, de l'Histoire à l'aventure, de la mythologie à la médecine, sans oublier la poésie, ce sont les facettes très multiples d'une culture d'une extrême richesse qui sont illustrées ici. Écrits par des chercheurs de plusieurs pays, les textes réunis et présentés dans cet ouvrage de référence renouvellent notre approche d'un monde fascinant et trop souvent méconnu.
Véronique Schiltz
Avant-propos
Valérie Hannin
Un passeur entre les mondes

Géoarchéologie des îles de la Méditerranée/Geoarchaeology of the Mediterranean Islands

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Géoarchéologie des îles de la Méditerranée/Geoarchaeology of the Mediterranean Islands
Géoarchéologie des îles de la Méditerranée/Geoarchaeology of the Mediterranean Islands
  • Éditeur : CNRS Éditions
  • Collection : Histoire
  • Lieu d’édition : Paris
  • Année d’édition : 2016
  • Publication sur OpenEdition Books : 28 novembre 2019
  • EAN (Édition imprimée) : 9782271089151
  • EAN électronique : 9782271130457
  • Nombre de pages : 344 p.
Parmi les dix mille îles et îlots de Méditerranée, moins de trois cents seraient habités et seulement deux cents mesureraient plus de 5 km2. Ces îles sont des entités géologiques et géographiques complexes où coexistent des formations de roches très anciennes et d'autres créées très récemment (îles volcaniques). A la fois ouvertes sur l'horizon et les côtes continentales voisines, elles restent, paradoxalement, relativement fermées de par leur isolement, créant ainsi des spécificités quant à leur biodiversité et leur colonisation par les sociétés humaines. Les îles de Méditerranée forment ainsi un objet d'étude privilégié pour la géoarchéologie. Celte dernière emprunte les concepts, les méthodes et les techniques de disciplines relevant des sciences humaines et environnementales (l'archéologie, l'épigraphie, la philologie, la géographie. la paléoécologie, la paléontologie...).
Cet ouvrage établit un premier état des connaissances dans le domaine de la géoarchéologie des îles de Méditerranée. L'éclatement géographique de ces dernières, ainsi qu'une histoire de l'occupation propre à chacune, démontrent toute la difficulté de globaliser ces espaces géographiques, progressivement transformés en territoires sous l'action répétée des sociétés humaines. Des spécialistes dressent ici les relations complexes entre les dynamiques et les processus paysagers et les logiques d'occupation humaine depuis la fin du Pléistocène.
Le présent ouvrage recueille vingt-quatre contributions regroupées dans cinq parties intitulées « Anthropisation et mutations paysagères à la transition Paléolithique/Néolithique » ; « Mobilité et reconstitution des anciens niveaux marins depuis la fin de la dernière grande glaciation quaternaire » ; « Adaptation aux mutations paysagères à l'échelle intra-site : la nécessaire prise en compte des paramètres environnementaux » ; « Deltas, lagunes et marais : des interfaces propices à l'implantation des sociétés humaines » et « Matières premières ; exploitation et interactions ».
Cet ouvrage s'adresse principalement à des spécialistes de géographie, d'archéologie et de paléoécologie mais aussi à un public plus large : étudiants des niveaux L-M-D, enseignants et simples néophytes souhaitant s'initier aux concepts, méthodes et techniques de la géoarchéologie.
Ghilardi Matthieu, Leandri Franck, Bloemendal Jan et al.
Introduction générale

Géoarchéologie des îles de Méditerranée

Partie 2. Mobilité et reconstitution des anciens niveaux marins depuis la fin de la dernière grande glaciation quaternaire / Shoreline displacements and sea level changes since the Last Glacial Maximum

Partie 3. Adaptation aux mutations paysagères à l'échelle intra-site : la nécessaire prise en compte des paramètres environnementaux / Human adaptation to site-scale landscape changes: the importance of environmental parameters

Giaime Matthieu, Morhange Christophe, Carayon Nicolas et al.
Les ports antiques des petites îles de Méditerranée

Proposition d’une typologie géoarchéologique

Partie 4. Deltas, lagunes et marais : des interfaces propices à l'implantation des sociétés humaines / Deltas, lagoons, and marshes as suitable environments for human habitation

Lespez Laurent, Müller Celka Sylvie et Pomadère Maia
Changements environnementaux et impact des sociétés humaines autour du site minoen de Malia (Crète, Grèce)

Bilan des acquis et nouvelles recherches

Intermediate Biblical Greek Reader: Galatians and Related Texts

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Intermediate Biblical Greek Reader: Galatians and Related Texts
(1 review)

Nijay K. Gupta, Portland Seminary
Jonah M. Sandford
Pub Date: 2018
ISBN 13: 9780999829233
Publisher: George Fox University Library
Language: English
Intermediate Biblical Greek Reader: Galatians and Related Texts cover image
After completing basic biblical Greek, students are often eager to continue to learn and strengthen their skills of translation and interpretation. This intermediate graded reader is designed to meet those needs. The reader is “intermediate” in the sense that it presumes the user will have already learned the basics of Greek grammar and syntax and has memorized Greek vocabulary words that appear frequently in the New Testament. The reader is “graded” in the sense that it moves from simpler translation work (Galatians) towards more advanced readings from the book of James, the Septuagint, and from one of the Church Fathers. In each reading lesson, the Greek text is given, followed by supplemental notes that offer help with vocabulary, challenging word forms, and syntax. Discussion questions are also included to foster group conversation and engagement. There are many good Greek readers in existence, but this reader differs from most others in a few important ways. Most readers offer text selections from different parts of the Bible, but in this reader the user works through one entire book (Galatians). All subsequent lessons, then, build off of this interaction with Galatians through short readings that are in some way related to Galatians. The Septuagint passages in the reader offer some broader context for texts that Paul quotes explicitly from the Septuagint. The Patristic reading from John Chrysystom comes from one of his homilies on Galatians. This approach to a Greek reader allows for both variety and coherence in the learning process.
This reader is a collaborative project that developed out of an advanced Greek course at Portland Seminary (2017-2018). The following students contributed equally to the content of the textbook.
Alexander Finkelson (MATS, Portland Seminary, 2018)
Bryn Pliska Girard (MATS, Portland Seminary, 2018)
Charles E. R. Jesch (MDIV, Portland Seminary, current student)
Paul C. Moldovan (MDIV, Portland Seminary, current student)
Jenny E. Siefken (MATS, Portland Seminary, current student)
Julianna Kaye Smith (MATS, Portland Seminary, 2018)
Jana Whitworth (MDIV, Portland Seminary, current student)
Kyle J. Williams (MATS, Portland Seminary, 2018)

Table of Contents

  • Lesson One: Galatians 1:1-9
  • Lesson Two: Galatians 1:10-17
  • Lesson Three: Galatians 1:18-24
  • Lesson Four: Galatians 2:1-10
  • Lesson Five: Galatians 2:11-21
  • Lesson Six: Galatians 3:1-9
  • Lesson Seven: Galatians 3:10-18
  • Lesson Eight: Galatians 3:19-29
  • Lesson Nine: Galatians 4:1-11
  • Lesson Ten: Galatians 4:12-20
  • Lesson Eleven: Galatians 4:21-31
  • Lesson Twelve: Galatians 5:1-15
  • Lesson Thirteen: Galatians 5:16-26
  • Lesson Fourteen: Galatians 6:1-10
  • Lesson Fifteen: Galatians 6:11-18
  • Lesson Sixteen: Introduction to Textual Criticism
  • Lesson Seventeen: LXX Genesis 12:1-3/LXX Leviticus 18:1-5
  • Lesson Eighteen: LXX Habakkuk 2:1-5/LXX Psalm 142:1-6
  • Lesson Nineteen: James 2:14-24
  • Lesson Twenty: John Chrysostom on Galatians 6:2
  • Lesson Twenty-One: Marcion's Redaction of Galatians


See AWOL's list of Open Access Textbooks and Language Primers relating to the ancient world

Thinking Through Thucydides

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[First posted in AWOL 31 July 2012, updated 29 November 2019]

Thinking Through Thucydides (T3)
The ancient Greek historian Thucydides famously claimed that his work would be ‘a possession for all time’: not just the history of a single war between the Athenians and the Spartans, but a guide to the way that the world works, and especially to politics and war.  He was right. Over the last two hundred years, Thucydides has been one of the most frequently quoted ancient writers. His ideas have influenced historians, politicians, international relations experts and soldiers; all agree that his work is useful and important.

Thucydides does not offer simple lessons, but a training course in analysis and deliberation. He demands that his readers follow his narrative of events and think about how things could have turned out differently; he asks them to listen to opposing arguments and to weigh up the issues – and then to think about how those arguments relate what actually happened.  He shows how the world is complicated – and how we can make sense of that complexity. In brief, he aims to help his readers to develop the skills that every citizen of a democracy needs.

The lessons that Thucydides offers are needed today more than ever. The problem is that his work is complex and difficult, even in the original Greek – and of course most readers have to rely on translations, often of dubious quality. The aim of the T3 project (Thinking Through Thucydides, or Thinking, Through Thucydides) is to make key passages from Thucydides' work accessible to as many people as possible, setting his words in context and explaining significant points. These passages can then serve as a resource for thinking about the world and our place in it, a starting-point for debate about some of the most vital issues that face us today.

The project is at a very early stage of development; on this webpage you will find one sample passage of Thucydides (II.43, from the Funeral Oration) along with contextual material and key questions to discuss, to show you what we have in mind. We plan to develop this resource in partnership with schools, so that it can serve as a resource for the study of both Classical Civilisation and Citizenship, but we hope that this will be of interest to everyone. In due course we will be introducing a blog where you can post your comments and suggestions, and get involved in debates about the significance of passages; in the meantime, if you have any comments, or if you would like to be involved in developing this project, please contact Neville Morley (n.d.g.morley(at)bris.ac.uk).

The Leo Strauss Center

New Open Access Journal: Pericles at Play: a Literary Classical Receptions Journal

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Pericles at Play: a Literary Classical Receptions Journal
Pericles at Play: a Literary Classical Receptions Journal publishes poetry and literary fiction with a relation to the classical world or its reception.
We hope to display some of the best contemporary voices writing classical receptions today, exhibiting different and diverse disciplinary approaches to the ancient and its reception, providing a platform for the performance of a ‘reception in action’.
Read more about the Pericles at Play on the Classical Receptions Studies Network: https://classicalreception.org/pericles-at-play-a-literary-classical-receptions-journal/
We would like to thank the Department of Greek and Latin at University College London, the British School at Athens, the Classical Receptions Studies Network, Professor Stephen Lambert, and the Dean of University College London Faculty of Arts & Humanities for both their advice and support.

 

New Open Access Journal: Journal of Religious Competition in Antiquity

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Journal of Religious Competition in Antiquity
The Journal of Religious Competition in Antiquity is a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary journal dedicated to exploring competitive interactions among religious and philosophical persons and groups in the ancient Mediterranean, including Greeks, Romans, Jews, Christians, and Muslims. We specifically aim to foster the development of new approaches and methodologies that highlight contours and nuances of religious competition between and among these communities and individuals. Special consideration is given to submissions that are interdisciplinary in approach and/or employ social-scientific theoretical frameworks. Our goal is to demonstrate competitive interactions among differing socio-religious discourses in antiquity and to explore the ways that these groups mutually influenced each other.

Current Volume: Volume 1 (2019)

Articles

See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies

Modern Classicisms

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Modern Classicisms
What is it about ancient Greek and Roman art that still captivates and provokes the modern imagination? How can contemporary art help us to see the classical tradition with new eyes? And what can modern-day responses – set against the backdrop of others over the last two millennia – tell us about our own cultural preoccupations?
Modern Classicisms sets out to explore these and other questions by bringing together classicists, art historians, critics and artists. The project commenced in August 2017: activities have included a workshop on 10 November 2017, and an exhibition in spring 2018This project comes about thanks to the generous support of Christian Levett and the Mougins Museum of Classical Art, with additional support from the Department of Classics and Faculty of Arts and Humanities at King’s College London. King’s is proud to be working with other external collaborative partners, including the Courtauld Institute of Art and Minerva (The International Review of Ancient Art and Archaeology).

Hercules Project

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Hercules Project
The Hercules Project aims to chart and account for the significance in western culture of the classical hero Hercules, from late antiquity via the Renaissance to the present day.
Building on the success of the 2013 Hercules: a Hero for All Ages conference, Stage 2 of Emma Stafford‘s Hercules project was supported by an AHRC Networking (2016-2018). This facilitated the development of a series of four publications on various aspects of the post-classical reception of Herakles-Hercules, via meetings between the editorial teams and a further conference, Celebrating Hercules in the Modern World, held at Leeds 7-9 June 2017.
The international network of scholars established by the two conferences is continually being consolidated and added to via the JISC mailing list Hercules: a hero for all ages and the Facebook Group Hercules2017: anyone interested in post-classical receptions of Herakles-Hercules is welcome to join!
You might also like to follow the Twitter Account @Hercules_Leeds, which we are using to promote activities undertaken by the Hercules Project.

    Open Access Journal: GROMA | documenting archaeology

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     [First posted in AWOL 24 May 2017, updated 1 December 2019]

    GROMA | documenting archaeology
    ISSN: 2531-6672
    DOI: 10.12977/groma
    Groma is an open access peer-reviewed e-journal of the Department of History and Cultures (DISCI) of the University of Bologna focusing on the different methodologies applied to archaeology. Particular attention is paid to Mediterranean archaeology and to specific methodological aspects such as archaeological documentation and landscape archaeology.

    Articles


    Notes


    Book reviews

    Open Access Journal: Wissenschaftlicher Jahresbericht des Österreichischen Archäologischen Instituts

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    Open Access Journal: Present Pasts

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    [First posted in AWOL 13 November 2009. Updated 1 December 2017]

    Present Pasts
    ISSN (online) 1759-2941
    As the journal of the UCL Institute of Archaeology Heritage Studies Section, Present Pasts contains global and cross-cultural perspectives in the fields of Cultural Heritage Studies, Public Archaeology and Museum Studies. The journal encourages debate on contentious issues, and seeks to give voice to a wide range of stakeholders in the Heritage sector.

    See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies

    Cuneiform Site Index (CSI): A gazetteer of findspots for cuneiform texts in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East

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    Cuneiform Site Index (CSI): A gazetteer of findspots for cuneiform texts in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East
    Rune Rattenborg
    This index contains primary spatial, toponym, attribute, and external link information on approximately two hundred and fifty locations across the Eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East where texts written in cuneiform and derived scripts have been found. The index has been prepared by Rune Rattenborg as part of Memories For Life: Materiality and Memory of Ancient Near Eastern Inscribed Private Objects a research project based at Uppsala University and the University of Cambridge financed by a Research Project Grant from the Swedish Research Council (grant no. 2016-02028). The intention is to continuously update this index to provide an easy digital geographical reference for Assyriologists, Near Eastern Archaeologists, and other researchers with an interest in the cuneiform script. New download versions will appear regularly. Time permitting, we will aim to expand the index to contain also basic periodisation and bibliographical information for easy reference, along with quantitative data.
    The current version of the index is stored with the University of Uppsala Department of Linguistics and Philology, hosted by Jakob Andersson and is available for download through links here. The index is supplied in .kml (suitable for use with GIS applications and Google Earth), .csv (for database integration) and .geojson (for GIS and web mapping applications).
    All resources are released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/).

    Index field categories

    This descriptive text is downloadable as .rtf. The index contains a total 14 fields, namely one primary ID, three integer fields for accuracy and data links, eight string fields with toponyms, and two spatial data fields. Index fields include site_id (string)accuracy (integer), cdli_provenience_id (integer), pleiades_id (integer), com_name (string), anc_name (string), transc_name (string)ara_name (string), fas_name (string), heb_name (string)gre_name (string),cdli_legacy (string),lat_wgs1984 (integer) and lot_wgs1984 (integer). Coordinates given use the WGS 1984 geographic coordinate reference system (EPSG 4326). Site locations have been traced from archaeological gazetteers and web mapping services (e.g. Pleiades and OpenStreetMap) and digitally generated from optical recognition using current and legacy satellite imagery datasets in QGIS 3.6. Below is a description of the individual data fields contained in this index.

    site_id (Primary ID)

    The primary ID for each record is an arbitrary and unique three-letter code.

    accuracy (Locational accuracy)

    This field gives an assessment of the level of accuracy with which the geographical location given can be said to relate to the historical location on a four-tier scale, being certain, being representative, 1 being tentative, and being unknown. Accuracy levels reflect site visibility and delineation. Where a discrete site outline can be traced, the site has been drawn as a polygon and the location derived from the resulting centroid, giving a value of 3. Where the site can be positively located, but not drawn (e.g. Bisutūn), the value is given as 2. Where a site location can be placed with reasonable certainty, but not positively located, the value is given as 1. Where the location cannot be defined with any reasonable degree of certainty, the value is 0.

    cdli_provenience_id (Primary ID)

    The numerical provenience ID for the corresponding site in the Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI) catalogue, if available. The previously employed set of provenience values can be found in the cdli_legacy field (see below). As integer record IDs will be employed by the CDLI going forward, legacy provenience values should be employed for reference only.

    pleiades_id (Pleiades ID)

    The primary ID of the corresponding place record in Pleiades: A Gazetteer of Ancient Places, if available. The stable link will be https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/[PleiadesID]. Please note that, while the record entity in the current index matches the record entity in Pleiades, the geographical location of the record contained in this index and the associated Pleiades record may not be the same. Records in this index not found in Pleiades will be added to the latter repository in due course.

    com_name (Common name)

    This field gives a common toponym for the location, most often the one by which the site has commonly appeared in the literature. It can be used for initial information searches, and also serves as the primary toponym in spatial index files supplied below. As names in this field rarely abide by uniform rules of transcription and are drawn from across different languages, they are poorly suited to be used as formal reference names.

    anc_name (Ancient name)

    This field gives a common rendering of the ancient name of the site in question, if known, based on readings from cuneiform texts. Places can, of course, have many names, and the current index is not intended to provide an exhaustive collection of all variant ancient writings or toponyms attested for individual records.

    transc_name (Transcribed name)

    This field give the modern name in Latin script maintained from the original when dealing with Maltese or Turkish toponyms or transcribed as accurately and consistently as possible from Arabic, Farsi, Greek or Hebrew toponyms. Where names in multiple languages are found, the transcribed name is drawn from the principal language of the national entity currently associated with the record in question.

    ara_name (Arabic name)

    The Arabic name of the site, if applicable and available. Values derive from archaeological reports or from online resources e.g. Wikipedia (Arabic) and OpenStreetMap. Note that the spelling of toponyms in Arabic may vary, and so discrepancies between values given in this index and other repositories may occur.

    fas_name (Farsi name)

    The Farsi name of the site, if applicable and available. Values derive from archaeological reports or from online resources, e.g. Wikipedia (Farsi) and OpenStreetMap. Note that the spelling of toponyms in Farsi may vary, and so discrepancies between values given in this index and other repositories may occur.

    gre_name (Greek name)

    The Greek name of the site, if applicable and available. Values derive from archaeological reports or from online resources, e.g. Wikipedia (English or Greek) and OpenStreetMap. Note that the spelling of toponyms in Greek may vary, and so discrepancies between values given in this index and other repositories may occur.

    heb_name (Hebrew name)

    The Hebrew name of the site, if applicable and available. Values derive from archaeological reports or from online resources, e.g. Wikipedia (Hebrew) and OpenStreetMap. Note that the spelling of toponyms in Hebrew may vary, and so discrepancies between values given in this index and other repositories may occur.

    cdli_legacy (CDLI legacy provenience)

    All associated legacy provenience values found in the current catalogue of the Cuneiform Digital Library Initative (www.cdli.ucla.edu) are given in this field, separated by ” : “. Where both a certain and a speculative value for the same provenience record exists (that is, the uncertain value is followed by “?”), the latter has not been included.

    lat_wgs1984 (Latitude)

    Latitude of the record location in decimal degrees in the WGS 1984 geographic coordinate reference system (EPSG 4326).

    lon_wgs1984 (Longitude)

    Longitude of the record location in decimal degrees in the WGS 1984 geographic coordinate reference system (EPSG 4326).

    And see AWOL's Roundup of Resources on Ancient Geography

    Christus in natura: Quellen, Hermeneutik und Rezeption des Physiologus

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    Christus in natura: Quellen, Hermeneutik und Rezeption des Physiologus

    [Christus in natura. Sources, Hermeneutics and Reception of the Physiologus]

    Ed. by Kindschi Garský, Zbyněk / Hirsch-Luipold, Rainer
    Funded by Schweizerischer Nationalfonds (SNF)

    Open Access

    Aims and Scope

    This volume offers detailed studies into the Physiologus, a Greek manuscript probably written in Egypt in the 2nd century CE. The Physiologus was the first Christian text to sum up a general understanding of nature using biblical and pagan sources and it has an extensive reception history throughout the medieval period. Its symbolic use of animals and plants, etc., has deeply influenced visual arts, literature, and heraldry, but this visual language often remains enigmatic. This book, going back to a project of the Swiss National Foundation (Das ‹Evangelium der Natur›. Der griechische Physiologus und die Wurzeln der frühchristlichen Naturdeutung) offers new insights into the origins and the interpretation of this symbolic language.

    Teil I: Einführung

    Teil II: Griechisch-römische Antike

    Teil III: Alter Orient, Hebräische Bibel und Septuaginta

    Teil V: Der Berner Physiologus

    L’archéologie cognitive

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    L’archéologie cognitive
    René Treuil (dir.)
     L’archéologie cognitive
    L'archéologie cognitive, née dans le monde anglo-saxon, a d'abord fait l'objet de maintes proclamations et développements théoriques, ce qui explique peut-être son faible impact sur la recherche française. Si elle n'a pas encore réussi à se constituer en discipline incontestable, c'est sans doute qu'elle se présente aujourd'hui beaucoup plus comme une série de questions qui se posent à la croisée-des disciplines que comme une branche particulière de l'archéologie. Principalement constituée...

    Lire la suite
    • Éditeur :Éditions de la Maison des sciences de l’homme
    • Collection : Cogniprisme
    • Lieu d’édition : Paris
    • Année d’édition : 2011
    • Publication sur OpenEdition Books : 29 novembre 2019
    • EAN (Édition imprimée) : 9782735113934
    • EAN électronique : 9782735119042
    • Nombre de pages : 288 p.

    The Epigraphic Landscape of Athens

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    The Epigraphic Landscape of Athens
    The Epigraphic Landscape of Athens
    Welcome to the Database of The Epigraphic Landscape of Athens, a project whose objective is to show the relationship between public inscriptions and urban space in ancient Athens
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    Every inscription, carved on stone and set up in the city space, can be also seen as a communication medium. Public documents (decrees, laws, treaties, accounts, lists, etc.) can be therefore considered as special objects, through which the 'voice' of the polis community is made tangible, becoming monument. In order to appreciate such an ancient communicative phenomenon in its entirety, it is important not to disjoint it from its physical presence and fruition in the polis-space, just as it is important not to ignore the double nature of the epigraphic documents as texts as well as monuments. In this regard, The Epigraphic Landscape of Athens is specially focused on the places of publication of the Athenian public inscriptions (i.e. documents issued from the late 6th century to Late Antiquity, and set up in the asty), grounding on the idea that urban spaces are able to complete, and even to enrich with further ideological or cultural overtones, the original message of the inscribed texts; and that these latter, with their very presence in the city, are able to produce a different sort of public space as 'written space'.
    The Epigraphic Landscape of Athens project is funded by the Italian Ministry of Education and Research in the frame of the SIR Programme (Scientific Independence of young Researchers) 2014, and hosted by the Department of Historical Studies, University of Turin.
    The ELA Database is an open-access online resource aimed at providing to scholars a new research tool for a topographical study of the Athenian public inscriptions as communication media in the frame of The Epigraphic Landscape of Athens project
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    The ELA Database population is currently in progress. Please consult the News section of the website for information about the current coverage, and the groups of inscriptions that are being scheduled for publication in the database. Updates on publications, conference speeches, and other activities related to The Epigraphic Landscape of Athens project are also provided on this page.
    You are anytime welcome to write to us at anytime for enquiries at chiara.lasagni@unito.it. Of course, relevant comments and suggestions, or new collaboration proposals are more than appreciated. A training demo of the database form is available in the Backend section of the website, through the login info “demo@epigraphiclandscape.unito.it” (user) - “demo” (password).
    How to cite the ELA Database as a source of reference
    The ELA Database records can be referred to in long or in abbreviated form. As for the latter, we recommend to use the abbreviation "ELA" followed by the ELA-id number. For citations in the long form, please consult the post note attached to each record: e.g.: ELA no. 144 = Lasagni, Chiara, Fragment of an honorific decree, 2017. DOI: 10.13135/ELA-141

    And see AWOL's Roundup of Resources on Ancient Geography