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Film: Greek Papyri: The Rediscovery of the Ancient World

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Greek Papyri: The Rediscovery of the Ancient World
Film about Greek Papyri from 1971. Script, direction, editing by Mirek Dohnal. With W. E. H. Cockle, D. M. Dixon, M. S. Drower, W. B. Emery, A. H. Griffiths, E. W. Handley, M. K. Haslam, A. A. Long, O. Skutsch, Susan Stephens, D. Thomas, E. G. Turner. University College London, Slade Film Unit. BFI

website: https://www.bfi.org.uk/films-tv-peopl...

 'Eric Gardner Turner (1911-1983)', Proceedings of the British Academy 73 (1987), p. 697: “1971 reached a high point . . . in May came the première of Mirek Dohnal’s film Greek Papyri (Turner had suggested the subject to the head of the Slade Film Unit; he and his pupils and colleagues starred, with Zauberflöte in the background, and many hours of patient labour; the film won a silver medal at the Venice Festival)."

Online Exhibition: Life Among Ruins: Greece & Turkey Between Past and Present

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Life Among Ruins: Greece & Turkey Between Past and Present
The exhibition "Life among ruins"explores the relationship of people of different social and ethnic groups and from different periods (Byzantine, Ottoman and Early Modern) in the Eastern Mediterranean with ruined remains of an earlier past. It investigates the impact of the past and its ancient ruins on people's lives, dreams and ideals in later periods.
The exhibition is divided in two parts:
A photographic exhibition, featuring photos of the 1930’s to 1950’s from excavations of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (ascsa) in the Athenian Agora, is hosted at the Allard Pierson Museum at Amsterdam (nl) between 21.10.2011 and 29.01.2012.
An online exhibition featuring drawings, sketches and maps of European travellers, who visited the Eastern Mediterranean between the 17th and 19th centuries. These illustrations come from printed books and maps of the 'Bijzondere Collecties' of the University of Amsterdam (nl). These images provide invaluable information on the antiquities themselves as well as on daily life in pre-modern Greece and Turkey.

introduction
the profile of the travellers
from a dutch point of view
the power of monuments
idealized landscapes
in search of antiquities
everyday life among ruins
in the service of the divine
athens: a place or an ideal?
ancient vs. contemporary
acknowledgements
selected bibliography
catalogue
links and resources travellers
 

Open Access Journal: Aestimatio: Critical Reviews in the History of Science

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[First posted in AWOL 15 October 2009. Most recently updated 24 March 2019]

Aestimatio: Critical Reviews in the History of Science
ISSN: 1549–4497 (online)
ISSN: 1549–4470 (print) 
Aestimatio provides critical, timely assessments of books published in the history of what was called science from antiquity up to the early modern period in cultures ranging from Spain to India, and from Africa to northern Europe. The aim is to allow reviewers the opportunity to engage critically both the results of research in the history of science and how these results are obtained.
Robert Hannah The Inscriptions of the Antikythera Mechanism by AMRG 1-9
Eileen Reeves Hermes and the Telescope: In the Crucible of Galileo’€™s Life-World by Paolo Palmieri 10-18
Glen Van Brummelen Essays on Medieval Computational Astronomy by José Chabás and Bernard R. Goldstein 19-25
Fernando Q. Gouvêa Research in the History and Philosophy of Mathematics: The CHSPM 2014 Annual Meeting in St. Catherine’s, Ontario by Maria Zack and Elaine Landry edd. 26-29
Richard Lorch Islamic Astronomy and Geography by David A. King 30-31
Roger Beck Recherches Mithriaques. Quarante ans de questions et d’€™investigations by Robert Turcan 32-36
Matjaž Vesel Before Copernicus and Copernicus 37-79
Harry Hine Metaphorical Coherence: Studies in Seneca’s Epistulae Morales by Aron Sjöblad 80-84
Joshua J. Reynolds Divination and Human Nature: A Cognitive History of Intuition in Classical Antiquity by Peter T. Struck 85-92

Taymāʾ I: Archaeological Exploration, Palaeoenvironment, Cultural Contacts

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Taymāʾ I: Archaeological Exploration, Palaeoenvironment, Cultural Contacts
edited by Arnulf Hausleiter, Ricardo Eichmann, Muhammad al-Najem. Hardback; 210x297mm; xii+268 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (66 plates in colour). 499 2018 Taymāʾ: Multidisciplinary Series on the Results of the Saudi-German Archaeological Project 1. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789690439. Epublication ISBN 9781789690446. 
Book contents page
Archaeological investigations in the north-western part of the Arabian Peninsula has increased during the last 15 years. One of the major sites in the region is the ancient oasis of Taymāʾ, known as a commercial hub on the so-called Incense Road connecting South Arabia with the Eastern Mediterranean. In the context of this new research a multidisciplinary project by the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) and the Orient Department of the German Archaeological Institute (DAI) has been investigating the archaeology and ancient environment of Taymāʾ since 2004. A major aim of this project was the development of new perspectives of the site and the region, characterised by elaborating the local socio-cultural and economic contexts. So far, Taymāʾ has been known mainly through exogenous sources.

The present volume is the first of the publication series of the Saudi-German archaeological project and focuses on three fundamental aspects of research at Taymāʾ: the current archaeological exploration of the oasis is contextualised with previous and ongoing research within the region, while at the same time offering a first overview of the settlement history of the site, which may have started as early as more than 6000 years ago. New information on the palaeoenvironment has been provided by multiproxy- analysis of sediments from a palaeolake immediately north of the settlement. The results indicate an Early Holocene humid period in the region that is shorter than the so-called African Humid Period. The abrupt aridification at around 8 ka BP, known from other regions in the Near East, is also attested in north-western Arabia. The reconstruction of the past vegetation of the site and its surroundings demonstrates that oasis cultivation at Taymāʾ started during the 5th millennium BCE with grapes and figs, rather than with the date palm. According to hydrological investigations on water resources, groundwater aquifers provided the main source of local water supply. These were exploited through wells, some of which have been identified in the area of the ancient oasis. Finally, since the time of early travellers to Northwest Arabia evidence of cultural contacts has been observed in the records from the site, which had been occupied by the last Babylonian king, Nabonidus (556–539 BCE) for ten years. A historical-archaeological essay on Egypt and Arabia as well as a study on the ambiguous relationship between Assyria and Arabia – characterised by conflict and commerce – shed new light on the foreign relations of ancient Taymāʾ.

About the Editors
ARNULF HAUSLEITER is researcher at the DAI’s Orient Department for the Taymāʾ project, funded by the German Research foundation (DFG). He has been field director of the excavations at Taymāʾ since 2004 and has co-directed the project with Ricardo Eichmann.

RICARDO EICHMANN is director of the Orient Department at the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin. He is the head of the German component of the Taymāʾ project and has co-directed it with Arnulf Hausleiter.

MUHAMMAD AL-NAJEM is head of the Antiquities Office of the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) and director of the Museum of Archaeology and Ethnography at Taymāʾ, Province of Tabuk, Saudi Arabia.
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Open Access users: by downloading this eBook you are agreeing to our standard terms and conditions available here.
Institutional subscribers: by downloading this eBook you are agreeing to abide by the subscription licence issued to The Institution. Contact your library for further details. If you encounter any issues with your download please contact info@archaeopress.com

Open Access Journal: Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture

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Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture
ISSN: 2399-1844 (Print) 
ISSN: 2399-1852 (online) 

The Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture - JHP - was launched 2016 in Berlin, Germany, by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom, Patricia Kögler and Wolf Rudolph - specialists working in the field of Hellenistic material culture.
JHP is an independent learned journal dedicated to the research of ceramics and objects of daily use of the Hellenistic period in the Mediterranean region and beyond. It aims at bringing together archaeologists, historians, philologists, numismatists and scholars of related disciplines engaged in the research of the Hellenistic heritage.
JHP wants to be a forum for discussion and circulation of information on the everyday culture of the Hellenistic period which to date is still a rather neglected field of study. To fill this academic void the editors strive for a speedy and non-bureaucratic publication and distribution of current research and recent discoveries combined with a high quality standard. The journal appears annually in print and as a free online downloadable PDF.
Volume 3
ARTICLES
Notes on a Hellenistic Milk Pail – by Yannis Chairetakis
Chasing Arsinoe (Polis Chrysochous, Cyprus): A Sealed Early Hellenistic Cistern and Its Ceramic Assemblage – by Brandon R. Olson, Tina Najbjerb & R. Scott Moore
Hasmonean Jerusalem in the Light of Archaeology – Notes on Urban Topography – by Hillel Geva
A Phoenician / Hellenistic Sanctuary at Horbat Turit (Kh. et-Tantur) – by Walid Atrash, Gabriel Mazor & Hanaa Aboud with contributions by Adi Erlich & Gerald Finkielsztejn
Schmuck aus dem Reich der Nabatäer – hellenistische Traditionen in frührömischer Zeit – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom
ARCHAEOLOGICAL NEWS AND PROJECT
Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project: Excavations at Pyla-Vigla in 2018 – by Thomas Landvatter, Brandon R. Olson, David S. Reese, Justin Stephens & R. Scott Moore
Bookmark: Ancient Gems, Finger Rings and Seal Boxes from Caesarea Maritima. The Hendler Collection – by Shua Amorai-Stark & Malka Herskovitz
BOOK REVIEWS
Nina Fenn, Späthellenistische und frühkaiserzeitliche Keramik aus Priene. Untersuchungen zu Herkunft und Produktion – by Susanne Zabehlicky-Scheffenegger
Raphael Greenberg, Oren Tal & Tawfiq Da῾adli, Bet Yerah III. Hellenistic Philoteria and Islamic al- Ṣinnabra. The 1933–1986 and 2007–2013 Excavations – bY Gabriel Mazor
Mohamed Kenawi & Giorgia Marchiori, Unearthing Alexandria’s archaeology: The Italian Contribution – by Carlo De Mitri
Volume 2
Table of ContentsArticles:
• Nadia Aleotti, Rhodian Amphoras from Butrint (Albania): Dating, Contexts and Trade
• Donald T. Ariel, Imported Hellenistic Stamped Amphora Handles and Fragments from the North Sinai Survey
• Ofra Guri-Rimon, Stone Ossuaries in the Hecht Museum Collection and the Issue of Ossuaries Use for Burial
• Gabriel Mazor & Walid Atrash, Nysa-Scythopolis: The Hellenistic Polis
• Hélène Machline & Yuval Gadot, Wading Through Jerusalem’s Garbage: Chronology, Function, and Formation Process of the Pottery Assemblages of the City’s Early Roman Landfill
• Kyriakos Savvopoulos, Two Hadra Hydriae in the Colection of the Patriarchal Sacristy in Alexandria
• Wolf Rudolph & Michalis Fotiadis, Neapolis Scythica – Simferopol – Test Excavations 1993
Archaeological News and Projects:
• »Dig for a Day« with the Archaeological Seminars Institute
Reviews:
• John Lund, A Study of the Circulation of Ceramics in Cyprus from the 3rd Century BC to the 3rd Century AD (by Brandon R. Olson)
• Gloria London, Ancient Cookware from the Levant. An Ethnoarchaeological Perspective (by John Tidmarsh)
• Michela Spataro & Alexandra Villing (eds.), Ceramics, Cuisine and Culture: The Archaeology and Sience of Kitchen Pottery in the Ancient Mediterranean World (by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom)
• James C. R. Gill, Dakhleh Oasis and the Western Desert of Egypt under the Ptolemies (by Andrea M. Berlin)
• Anna Gamberini, Ceramiche fini ellenistiche da Phoinike. Forme, produzioni, commerce (by Carlo De Mitri)
• Maja Mise, Gnathia and Related Hellenistic Ware on the East Adriatic Coast (by Patricia Kögler)
• Jens-Arne Dickmann & Alexander Heinemann (eds.), Vom Trinken und Bechern. Das antike Gelage im Umbruch (by Stella Drougou)

  Download (pdf) 

Open Access users: by downloading this eBook you are agreeing to our standard terms and conditions available here.
Institutional subscribers: by downloading this eBook you are agreeing to abide by the subscription licence issued to The Institution. Contact your library for further details. If you encounter any issues with your download please contact info@archaeopress.com
Volume 1
Table of Contents:
A Fill from a Potter’s Dump at Morgantina – by Shelley Stone
Trade in Pottery within the Lower Adriatic in the 2nd century BCE – by Carlo De Mitri
Hellenistic Ash Containers from Phoinike (Albania) – by Nadia Aleotti
Pottery Production in Hellenistic Chalkis, Euboea. Preliminary Notes – by Yannis Chairetakis
A Terracotta Figurine of a War Elephant and Other Finds from a Grave at Thessaloniki – by Eleni Lambrothanassi & Annareta Touloumtzidou
Moldmade Bowls from Straton’s Tower (Caesarea Maritima) – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom
Greco-Roman Jewellery from the Necropolis of Qasrawet (Sinai) – by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom

ARCHAEOLOGICAL NEWS AND PROJECTS
Panathenaic Amphorae of Hellenistic and Roman Times – by Martin Streicher

BOOK REVIEWS
Shelley C. Stone, Morgantina Studies 6. The Hellenistic and Roman Fine Wares – by Peter J. Stone
Pia Guldager Bilde & Mark L. Lawall (eds.), Pottery, Peoples and Places, BSS 16 – by Kathleen Warner Slane
Susan I. Rotroff, Hellenistic Pottery. The Plain Wares, Agora 33 – by Patricia Kögler

Open Access Journal: Practitioners' Voices in Classical Reception Studies

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[First posted in AWOL 1 June 2010. Updated 26 March 2019]

Practitioners' Voices in Classical Reception Studies
ISSN: 1756-5049
PVCRS is very much a companion publication to our ejournal New Voices in Classical Reception Studies and our Eseminar Archive. All add to the range of resources that are made freely available on the Open University Reception of Classical Texts Research Project website. New Voices provides a refereed platform for newer researchers to publish their work. The Eseminar Archive makes available the records of the annual seminar that discusses all aspects of classical reception. Practitioners' Voices is a response to the growing awareness that Classical Reception research has to recognise the full range of processes that shape the impact of classical material in new contexts. Its aim is to provide a Forum in which theatre directors, designers, dramaturgs, actors, poets, translators, and all involved in the creative practices that are so crucial to classical receptions can discuss the relationship between their work and the classical texts, themes and contexts on which they draw.
We hope that the Forum will also lead to further dialogue between creative practitioners and critics and academics (who are after all also practitioners).


Issue 8 (2017)



Ben Ferris

Ben Ferris is a film writer/director whose films have screened at festivals throughout the world (in Paris, Athens, New York, Tokyo, Karlovy Vary, Zagreb, Sarajevo, Skopje, Singapore, Sydney). His short film The Kitchen (2003) won the Grand Prix at the Akira Kurosawa Memorial Short Film Festival in Tokyo in 2005, and his short film Ascension (2004) won the Grand Prix at the 4th One Take Film Festival in Croatia in 2004.
His debut feature film Penelope, an Australian-Croatian co-production, screened in National Competition at the 56th Pula Film Festival in Croatia in 2009, and won a Van Gogh Award for Best Fantasy Film at the Amsterdam Film Festival in 2010. His second feature film, 57 Lawson (2016), captures daily life in a social housing building in Redfern, under the shadow of impending development. Ben is currently the Artistic Director of the Sydney Film School which he co-founded in 2004. He was the curator of the Sydney Cinémathèque in 2015, and his writings on cinema have been published worldwide in both French and English.
This interview with Leanne Glass was recorded via Skype on 13th January 2016.

Issue 9 (2018)

Penny Boreham, with Prodromos Tsinikoris, Giles Lewin, and Anastasia Bakogianni

Penny Boreham has been working as a radio producer and broadcaster for the last 30 years. She was on staff with the BBC until 2003 but since then has worked independently for the BBC, the child rights agency ‘Child to Child’, The Open University and numerous other organisations. Her mother named her Penelope because of her love of ‘the Odyssey’ and then read her the Greek myths as a young child. She has loved them ever since. 
Prodromos Tsinikoris was born in Wuppertal, Germany. Today he lives in Athens. He is the co-artistic director of the Experimental Stage-I of the National Theatre and works as a dramaturg, performer and theatre director. 
Giles Lewin is a British violinist and music composer, but also a vocalist who can play the fiddle, vielle, rebec, gittern, shawms, recorder, mandolin, pipe and tabor. He is particularly interested in old musical instruments and styles.
Penny, Prodromos and Giles worked together on a radio programme for the BBC World Service entitled Telling Tales: The Odyssey, which juxtaposed the stories of refugees on the Greek island of Lesvos with Homer's OdysseyAnastasia Bakogianni was academic consultant on the programme; she conducted the following interviews with Penny, Prodromos and Giles for Practitioners' Voices in Classical Reception Studies.

Past Issues

Montage of 4 photographs from a 2008 production of Cloudcuckooland

Open Access Journal: Graeco-Latina Brunensia

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[First posted in AWOL 4 January 2014, updated 26 March 2019]

Graeco-Latina Brunensia
ISSN: 1803-7402 (print)
ISSN: 2336-4424 (online)
Description: Časopis Graeco-Latina Brunensia, ISSN 1803-7402 je odborný recenzovaný časopis, který uveřejňuje příspěvky z klasické filologie, klasické archeologie, dějin starověku, medievistiky a také byzantologie i pozdějšího vývoje řeckého a latinského jazyka (či jevů z nich vycházejících). Vychází dvakrát ročně od r. 2009. Je pokračováním periodika Sborník prací filozofické fakulty brněnské univerzity (SPFFBU; Studia minora facultatis philosophicae universitatis Brunensis), řady klasické (N), ISSN 1211-6335, která vycházela letech 1996-2008 a řady archeologicko-klasické (E), ISSN 0231-7915 (1956-1995). 
 

Description: Graeco-Latina Brunensia, ISSN 1803-7402, is scholarly peer reviewed journal which publishes contributions from the fields of of Classical Philology, Classical Archeology, Ancient History, Medieval Studies, as well as Byzantine Studies and later development of the Greek and Latin languages. It has been published since 2009 and is issued twice a year. Graeco-Latina Brunensia is continuation of the periodical Sborník prací filozofické fakulty brněnské univerzity (SPFFBU; Studia minora facultatis philosophicae universitatis Brunensis), Series classica (N), ISSN 1211-6335, which was published in 1996-2008 and Series archaeologica-classica (E), ISSN 0231-7915 (1956-1995).
Most recent issues:

Graeco-Latina Brunensia
2018, vol. 23, iss. 2

Logo
Year: 2018
Publication year: 2018
ISSN: 1803-7402 (print)
ISSN: 2336-4424 (online)

Table of contents:

Články – Articles

5-11 Toward the etymology of Latin littera Blažek, Václav | pdficon

13-24 Le substantif latin mundus: un avatar de l'étrusque mutna? Brachet, Jean-Paul | pdficon

25-42 Suavis und dulcis bei Aurelius Augustinus Chernyukh, Bohdan | pdficon

43-66 Golden Age, its projections, and the image of boundary in Tibullus Dombrovskyi, Markiyan | pdficon

67-73 A note on the ancient idea of a Danube with two estuaries Habaj, Michal | pdficon

75-93 G.B. Basile and Apuleius: first literary tales : morphological analysis of three fairytales Hurbánková, Šárka | pdficon

95-107 Evocatio deorum as an example of a crisis ritual in Roman religion Musiał, Danuta; Gillmeister, Andrzej | pdficon

109-126 Deserters from the First Crusade and their ambiguous portrayal in twelfth-century Latin sources Sitár, Adam | pdficon

127-146 Führer durch das mittelalterliche Jenseits – eine Übersicht Slíva, Jan | pdficon

147-162 Didactic features in two Latin translations of Aratus'ΦαινόμεναŠevčíková, Tereza | pdficon

163-170 Zwei Empfehlungsgedichte von Johannes Gregor Macer Szepsius (ca 1530 – nach 1579)Šimon, František | pdficon

171-178 Authorship controversy in three Greek epigrams: Phalaecus revived Witczak, Krzysztof Tomasz | pdficon


179-180 Graeco-Latina Brunensia | pdficon
2018 (Volume 23) 12
2017 (Volume 22) 12
2016 (Volume 21) 12
2015 (Volume 20) 12
2014 (Volume 19) 12

Open Access Journal: The Journal of Septuagint and Cognate Studies (JSCS) formerly, The Bulletin of the International Organization of Septuagint and Cognate Studies (BIOSCS)

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The Journal of Septuagint and Cognate Studies (JSCS) formerly, The Bulletin of the International Organization of Septuagint and Cognate Studies (BIOSCS)
ISSN: 2325-4793
ISSN: 0145-3890













The International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies produces an annual journal, the Journal of Septuagint and Cognate Studies (JSCS). For issues 1 through 43, it was known as Bulletin of the International Organization of Septuagint and Cognate Studies (BIOSCS). With issue 44, the name changed to Journal of Septuagint and Cognate Studies. Under either name, the Journal is the periodical publication of the IOSCS. 

Each issue contains articles, book reviews, notices of recent dissertations, and society information. The JSCS is indexed in the ATLA Religion Database, Old Testament Abstracts, and New Testament Abstracts. 

The Journal's Editor is Siegfried Kreuzer. An Editorial Board with native competence in French, German, and English assists the Editor with the peer-review process for articles submitted to the Journal, and with policy and procedures for the Journal. The current Board consists of James Aitken from Cambridge (UK), Cécile Dogniez (Paris, France), Siegfried Kreuzer (Wuppertal, Germany), and Ross Wagner (Duke University, USA). 

The Journal is sent to every current member of IOSCS. For subscription information, please visit visit our membership page

The major contents of the Journal are listed elsewhere in this website. Digitized copies (PDF files) of the first 43 volumes of the Journal are available. Printed back issues of the Journal are available from Peeters Publishers.

Starting with issue 50 in 2018, we have a new publisher: Peeters Publishers. Eisenbrauns published issues 34 through 49. In 2017, Eisenbrauns became part of another publishing house. We are grateful for 20 years of fruitful collaboration with Eisenbrauns, and we look forward to collaboration with Peeters Publishers. 

The International Standard Serial Number (ISSN) of the JSCS is 2325-4793. The ISSN of the BIOSCS is 0145-3890.
Volumes available online:

Volume Year Download PDF
BIOSCS Volume 1 1968 (Originally mimeographed, Volume 1 is reprinted at the back of Volume 2.)
BIOSCS Volume 2 1969 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 3 1970 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 4 1971 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 5 1972 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 6 1973 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 7 1974 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 8 1975 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 9 1976 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 10 1977 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 11 1978 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 12 1979 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 13 1980 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 14 1981 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 15 1982 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 16 1983 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 17 1984 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 18 1985 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 19 1986 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 20 1987 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 21 1988 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 22 1989 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 23 1990 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 24 1991 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 25 1992 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 26 1993 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 27 1994 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 28 1995 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 29 1996 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 30 1997 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 31 1998 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 32 1999 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 33 2000 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 34 2001 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 35 2002 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 36 2003 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 37 2004 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 38 2005 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 39 2006 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 40 2007 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 41 2008 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 42 2009 Download this PDF
BIOSCS Volume 43 2010 Download this PDF
JSCS Volume 44 2011 (PDF not yet available)
JSCS Volume 45 2012 (PDF not yet available)
JSCS Volume 46 2013 (PDF not yet available)
JSCS Volume 47 2014 (PDF not yet available)
JSCS Volume 48 2015 (PDF not yet available)
JSCS Volume 49 2016 (PDF not yet available)
JSCS Volume 50 2017 (PDF not yet available)
JSCS Volume 51 2018 (PDF not yet available)


Digitized publications of Mark Lidzbarski at Menadoc

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Open Access Journal: ICONEM Newsletter

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ICONEM Newsletter
Founded in 2013, Iconem is an innovative startup that specialises in the digitisation of endangered cultural heritage sites in 3D. We work with international organisations, national governments, local authorities, and world class museums such as UNESCO, the Aga Khan Trust for Culture, the Sultanate of Oman, the City of Paris, and the Louvre. We design site-specific architectural 3D models; large-scale urban and rural 3D models; museum exhibitions; and training for local professionals.

  • 03/22/2019 - Europe supports Time Machine - Iconem March Newsletter
  • 02/08/2019 - Murad Khani in 3D, Iconem in NYC, and exhibition tickets in Iconem's Winter Newsletter
  • 12/20/2018 - Mont-Saint-Michel in 3D and more in Iconem’s 2018 Year in Review
  • 11/08/2018 - Iconem museum expositions worldwide – Iconem’s November Newsletter
  • 10/17/2018 - Iconem event - Get a free ticket to the Salon International du Patrimoine
  • 10/04/2018 - “Cités millénaires” exhibition opens 10 October – Iconem’s October Newsletter
  • 09/06/2018 - Mark your calendars! Exhibitions, UNESCO, European Heritage Days… Iconem’s September Newsletter
  • 08/02/2018 - Iconem’s August Newsletter - Travel to the South of France in 3D
  • 07/13/2018 - Iconem's July Newsletter - Qalhat's inscription on the UNESCO World Heritage list!
  • 06/07/2018 - Cultural heritage and AI - Iconem's spring newsletter
  • 04/26/2018 - Exciting news from Iconem - April Newsletter
  • 03/27/2018 - Our latest 3D model and more! Iconem's March Newsletter
  • 02/27/2018 - Cultural heritage and technology - Iconem's February Newsletter
  • 01/26/2018 - Happy New Year! Iconem's January Newsletter
  • 12/15/2017 - 2017 in Review - Afghanistan, south of France, Iraq, Oman, Spain, Syria…
  • 11/15/2017 - Iconem October 2017 Newsletter - Iconem around Paris, Europe, and in the media!
  • 10/25/2017 - INVITATION Gagnez 20 places pour la conférence "Reconstruire Alep" (3 nov.) avec la DGAM et l'AKTC
  • 10/06/2017 - Follow Iconem mission in Kurdistan: zoroastrian site, castle, ancient village seen from drone
  • 09/07/2017 - Find out what we did this summer !
  • 08/03/2017 - [NEW FORMAT] Iconem in July: photos, 3D and interview
  • See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies

    The Oath in Archaic and Classical Greece

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    [First posted in AWOL 19 May 2016, updated 27 March 2019 (new URLs)]

    The Oath in Archaic and Classical Greece
    Acharnai stele (c) Efa
    This is the homepage of the Oath in Archaic and Classical Greece Project, based in the Department of Classics, University of Nottingham, directed by Alan H. Sommerstein, and funded by the Leverhulme Trust, which has created a database of all references to oaths in Greek texts of all kinds from the earliest alphabetic inscriptions down to 322 BC, the year of the death of Aristotle and the end of the classical Athenian democracy, and is now engaged in the analysis and interpretation of this evidence, preparing a two-volume study of The Oath in Archaic and Classical Greece (click here for details of this and our other publications).

    The oath (if you’re not quite sure what an oath is – or even if you think you are – read this explanation) was an institution of fundamental importance across an enormously wide range of social interactions throughout the ancient Greek world, its binding force one of the most important contributions of religion to social stability and harmony. For this reason, oaths are uttered, prescribed, or referred to in almost every kind of literary or inscriptional text we have from archaic and classical Greece, and a comprehensive study of the subject requires a survey covering all these texts. Until the project began its work in 2004, no such survey existed. Indeed there had been no comprehensive, dedicated scholarly study of the oath in ancient Greek society since 1902, though during the century since then much new evidence had become available and the study of society, ancient and modern, had been revolutionized. The aim of the project was to fill this gap by the creation and exploitation of our database. It has been created mainly by Andrew Bayliss and Isabelle Torrance , under the general direction of Alan Sommerstein, with valuable assistance from Jennifer Edmond and her successor Teri Browett of the Humanities Research Centre, and Richard Tyler-Jones from the Academic and Research Applications Team. As promised from the start, the database is now being made available for general use. Here you can quickly search among our 3700-plus records using a wide range of search criteria, and find the answers to questions that we may not even have thought of asking.

    Newly Open Access Journal: Acta ad archaeologiam et artium historiam pertinentia

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    Acta ad archaeologiam et artium historiam pertinentia
    ISSN: 2611-3686 
    Page Header
    Acta ad archaeologiam et artium historiam pertinentia (ACTA) is published by the Norwegian Institute in Rome in association with Scienze e Lettere, Rome. ACTA publishes articles relevant to Mediterranean archaeology and art history within the broader interdisciplinary mission statement of the Institute. ACTA is an international, open access journal that simultaneosly publishes a paper and an electronic version.















    2001

    See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies

    Vetus Latina - Resources for the study of the Old Latin Bible

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    [First posted in AWOL 27 January 2013, updated 27 March 2019]

     Vetus Latina - Resources for the study of the Old Latin Bible
    This website, online since 2003, provides resources on the Vetus Latina for scholars and students engaged in the study of the early Church and the history of the Bible. A number of these are related to the scholarly edition produced by the Vetus Latina Institute and its collaborators. It also hosts additional material for a monograph on The Latin New Testament: A Guide to its History, Texts, and Manuscripts published by Oxford University Press in 2016 (further information here.
    Introduction

    Vetus Latina Editions
     
    Old Latin Manuscripts
       Gospels
       Rest of NT
       Concordance of Sigla


    Patristic Abbreviations

    Prefaces, Prologues
    and Capitula


    Latin Gospel Manuscripts
    with Fischer's sigla


    Links
     



    Beta maṣāḥǝft: Manuscripts of Ethiopia and Eritrea (Schriftkultur des christlichen Äthiopiens und Eritreas: eine multimediale Forschungsumgebung)

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    Beta maṣāḥǝft: Manuscripts of Ethiopia and Eritrea (Schriftkultur des christlichen Äthiopiens und Eritreas: eine multimediale Forschungsumgebung)
    The project Beta maṣāḥǝft: Manuscripts of Ethiopia and Eritrea (Schriftkultur des christlichen Äthiopiens und Eritreas: eine multimediale Forschungsumgebung) is a long-term project funded within the framework of the Academies' Programme (coordinated by the Union of the German Academies of Sciences and Humanities) under survey of the Akademie der Wissenschaften in Hamburg. The funding will be provided for 25 years, from 2016–2040. The project is hosted by the Hiob Ludolf Centre for Ethiopian Studies at the Universität Hamburg. It aims at creating a virtual research environment that shall manage complex data related to the predominantly Christian manuscript tradition of the Ethiopian and Eritrean Highlands.
    You are very welcome to join us and contribute to the digitization and digital description of the manuscript tradition of the Ethiopian and Eritrean Highlands. See the section on contributing and reusing data below.

    Open Access Journal: Dictynna: revue de poétique latine

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    [First posted in AWOL 2 December 2010. Updated 28 March 2019]

    Dictynna: revue de poétique latine
    http://dictynna.revues.org/docannexe/file/319/dictynna.png
    Si l'on en croit Callimaque, qui raconte cette histoire dans son hymne à Artémis, Dictynna est l'épithète que gagna la nymphe Britomartis, à l'issue d'une aventure amoureuse où elle faillit périr. Elle s'était jetée dans les flots pour échapper à Minos, qui la poursuivait depuis  neuf mois, et fut sauvée par des pêcheurs qui   la recueillirent dans leurs filets. On la surnomma Dictynna (du mot diktuon, « filet ») et  on désigna sous le nom de Dikté le mont d'où elle avait bondi. Le nom de Dictynna est attesté à l'époque mycénienne : ce fut, sans doute, celui d'une déesse crétoise de la chasse avant de désigner une compagne d'Artémis, puis de devenir une épiclèse de la déesse elle-même.
    lire la suite...

    15 | 2018

    Open Access Journal: Heritage Science

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    Heritage Science
    ISSN: 2050-7445
    Heritage Science Cover Image
    Heritage Science is an open access journal publishing original peer-reviewed research covering:
    • Understanding of the manufacturing processes, provenances, and environmental contexts of material types, objects, and buildings, of cultural significance including their historical significance.
    • Understanding and prediction of physico-chemical and biological degradation processes of cultural artefacts, including climate change, and predictive heritage studies.
    • Development and application of analytical and imaging methods or equipments for non-invasive, non-destructive or portable analysis of artwork and objects of cultural significance to identify component materials, degradation products and deterioration markers.
    • Development and application of invasive and destructive methods for understanding the provenance of objects of cultural significance.
    • Development and critical assessment of treatment materials and methods for artwork and objects of cultural significance.
    • Development and application of statistical methods and algorithms for data analysis to further understanding of culturally significant objects.
    • Publication of reference and corpus datasets as supplementary information to the statistical and analytical studies above.
    • Description of novel technologies that can assist in the understanding of cultural heritage.
    Where research reflects current usage of and advances in analytical techniques, it is anticipated that authors will place their work in the context of cultural and conservation studies. The conclusions should clarify the importance of the findings to heritage science, to be clear that the advance is not merely to record a number of measurements.
    Recent articles :
    1. Content type: Research article

      In this paper, a sword is investigated from a collection of archaeological iron swords displayed in the Egyptian Museum from the civilization centered on Ballana and Qustul in Egyptian Nubia (380–600 A.D.). A ...
      Authors: Yussri Salem, Omid Oudbashi and Doaa Eid
      Citation:Heritage Science 2019 7:19
      Published on:
    2. Content type: Research article

      Lead used to be a common material for setting seal to historical documents. Lead seals formed parts of historical documents as a guarantee of their legal validity. Disinfectants are commonly used during the re...
      Authors: Sarka Msallamova, Milan Kouril, Kristyna Charllote Strachotova, Jan Stoulil, Kateryna Popova and Pavla Dvorakova
      Citation:Heritage Science 2019 7:18
      Published on:
    3. Content type: Research article

      In conservation science, the identification of painting materials is fundamental for the study of artists’ palettes, for dating and for understanding on-going degradation phenomena. For these purposes, the stu...
      Authors: Alessia Artesani, Marta Ghirardello, Sara Mosca, Austin Nevin, Gianluca Valentini and Daniela Comelli
      Citation:Heritage Science 2019 7:17
      Published on:
    4. Content type: Review

      This review addresses the use of computational fluid dynamics for the interpretation and preservation of heritage. Fluid dynamic simulations in the heritage field focus mostly on slow air movement in indoor sp...
      Authors: Josep Grau-Bové, Luca Mazzei, Matija Strlic and May Cassar
      Citation:Heritage Science 2019 7:16
      Published on:
    5. Content type: Research article

      Liquid chromatography with UV–Vis and mass spectrometric detection (LC–DAD–MS) was applied to the identification of dyes and biological sources in samples from nineteenth to twentieth century ethnographic text...
      Authors: Irina Petroviciu, Iulia Teodorescu, Florin Albu, Marian Virgolici, Eugenia Nagoda and Andrei Medvedovici
      Citation:Heritage Science 2019 7:15
      Published on:
    6. Content type: Research article

      Quantitation of paint powders of ancient wall paintings is often hindered by the calcite contamination during samples withdrawal. To overcome this problem, a new approach was explored based on the mechanical p...
      Authors: Monica Gelzo, Gaetano Corso, Rita Pecce, Ottavia Arcari, Ciro Piccioli, Antonio Dello Russo and Paolo Arcari
      Citation:Heritage Science 2019 7:12
      Published on:
    7. Content type: Research article

      This paper proposes a new approach to collection surveying based on epidemiology, the discipline that describes and explains disease patterns in populations. In epidemiology the focus of attention lies not onl...
      Authors: Cristina Duran-Casablancas, Josep Grau-Bové, Tom Fearn and Matija Strlič
      Citation:Heritage Science 2019 7:11
      Published on:
    8. Content type: Review

      Wear and tear is the outcome of degradation most frequently reported in assessments of archival and library collections. It is also problematic to study in controlled experiments, due to the difficulty in repr...
      Authors: Cristina Duran-Casablancas, Josep Grau-Bové and Matija Strlič
      Citation:Heritage Science 2019 7:10
      Published on:
    9. Content type: Research article

      Ukiyo-e Japanese woodblock prints were mass-produced in the Edo Period and early impressions of a given print are generally of higher quality and more sought after by connoisseurs than late impressions. The pr...
      Authors: Capucine F. Korenberg, Lucia Pereira-Pardo, Peter J. McElhinney and Joanne Dyer
      Citation:Heritage Science 2019 7:9
      Published on:
    10. Content type: Research article

      Modern art materials introduced since the end of XIX century include a large number of formulations of synthetic polymers and pigments, whose degradation processes and best preservation conditions are a major ...
      Authors: Jacopo La Nasa, Greta Biale, Francesca Sabatini, Ilaria Degano, Maria Perla Colombini and Francesca Modugno
      Citation:Heritage Science 2019 7:8
      Published on:
    11. Content type: Research article

      This paper presents the results of a study of pigment-binder systems painted on parchment, both in the form of reference samples prepared in the laboratory, and of medieval and Renaissance illuminated manuscri...
      Authors: Luca Nodari and Paola Ricciardi
      Citation:Heritage Science 2019 7:7
      Published on:
    12. Content type: Research article

      This research presents the damage mechanism of a historical masonry architecture induced by differential settlement based on 3D FE analysis. The purpose of the study was to investigate the behavior fully-satur...
      Authors: Sayed Hemeda
      Citation:Heritage Science 2019 7:6
      Published on:
    13. Content type: Research article

      To understand the effects of an acidic environment on the internal structure of sandstone from the Yungang Grottoes, Datong, China, the physicochemical properties of fresh and weathered sandstone samples and t...
      Authors: Hong Geng, Shijie Zhang, Jianhui Zhi, Runping Zhang, Jianguang Ren and Chul-Un Ro
      Citation:Heritage Science 2019 7:4
      Published on:
    14. Content type: Research article

      Mosaics, one of the most important decorative artworks in the Roman culture, were usually elaborated with a set of tesserae joined with lime or others binders to form geometric or figurative decorations. The i...
      Authors: Iker Marcaida, Maite Maguregui, Héctor Morillas, Nagore Prieto-Taboada, Marco Veneranda, Silvia Fdez-Ortiz de Vallejuelo, Alberta Martellone, Bruno De Nigris, Massimo Osanna and Juan Manuel Madariaga
      Citation:Heritage Science 2019 7:3
      Published on:

    See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies

    Sembase: a database project for the study of Semitic roots

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     [First posted in AWOL 2 March 2013, updated 28 March 2019]

    Sembase: a database project for the study of Semitic roots
    http://www.sembase.org/sembase2.jpg
    In today's world, even people in the same general discipline, but specialized in different areas, may not understand each other's work. Nonlinguists working on Middle East topics, or linguists devoting their time to the study of other language families, may not have been exposed to the Semitic family of languages (or Semitic subfamily of Afro-Asiatic). The Semitic languages all share certain distinctive characteristics. This project is especially dependent on one of them, the consonantal root system. This very brief introduction is intended to enable the nonspecialist to more fully understand Sembase...
    PROJECT
    INFO

    History
    Concept
    Design

    Applications

    OTHER
    STUFF

    Status
    Fonts
    Semslave

    Contact

    Collaborative Database of Dateable Greek Bookhands (CDDGB)

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    Collaborative Database of Dateable Greek Bookhands (CDDGB)
    The Collaborative Database of Dateable Greek Bookhands (CDDGB) is a catalogue of Greek manuscripts written in a literary script which, apart from a few exceptions, can be dated on the basis of some objective criterion, such as the presence of a document on the reverse side which contains a date, or a dateable archaeological context associated with the manuscript. These manuscripts are important because they provide papyrologists and paleographers with an evidential base for tracing the evolution of Greek handwriting and for dating other manuscripts which lack objective criteria. Presently the database includes manuscripts from the first nine centuries of the Common Era (0–899 CE). It will ultimately be expanded to include manuscripts dated to earlier centuries. Manuscripts written in minuscule script are excluded. Though influenced by PapPal, the CDDGB differs from it in that it focuses on dateable bookhands.
    As its name implies, the CDDGB intends to be a collaborative project, eliciting on-going feedback from the scholarly community. It is a work in progress. Under the “Collaborate” tab, anyone can submit new dateable manuscripts for consideration or offer suggested edits for the data currently provided in the catalogue. We hope that interested members of the academic community will help to improve the various entries.
    The CDDGB is not intended to contain the extensive bibliographical information associated with the various manuscripts in the database, nor have we consulted all of the secondary literature for each item. Users should be aware that in certain cases the information which is presented in the CDDGB is a matter of debate. We are glad to be apprised of any needed updates. Users are also encouraged to consult the Leuven Database of Ancient Books and, when its results are published, the authoritative project, “Greek Literary Hands of the Roman Period,” a collaboration between the University of Oxford and the University of Cassino. This latter project is much anticipated, as it will present the results of an exhaustive survey of literary and sub-literary papyri from the Roman period by paleographical experts.
    The CDDGB was created and is maintained by Grant Edwards, a PhD student at the University of Birmingham.

    Lewis & Short Latin Dictionary (CEX, Markdown)

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    Lewis & Short Latin Dictionary (CEX, Markdown)
    This repository holds an edition of the Lewis & Short Latin Dictionary formatted as a CEX file, with the lexicon's entries formatted lightly in Markdown.
    The original digitization of the public domain text of the LSJ is courtesy of the Perseus Digital Library: Text provided by Perseus Digital Library, with funding from The National Endowment for the Humanities. Original version available for viewing and download at http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/.
    License CC 3.0 BY-NC-SA.

    Contents

    • ls.cex A Cite Collection of the entries in the dictionaryj, with accompanying documentation of a discoverable text property extension identifying the entry property as a having a primtive type String and an extended type Markdown. URNs for the LSJ collection are, e.g. urn:cts:hmt:lsj.markdown:n51.
    • lsj.index A searchable index as tabulated lines, with # as the field delimiter. The fields are:
      1. The ID (object-selector) of an entry
      2. The lemma

    Corrections

    Please submit corrections as issues in GitHub or (ideally) in the form of pull-requests.

    LSJ Lexicon (CEX, Markdown)

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    LSJ Lexicon (CEX, Markdown)
    This repository holds an edition of the LSJ Lexicon formatted as a CEX file, with the lexicon's entries formatted lightly in Markdown.
    The original digitization of the public domain text of the LSJ is courtesy of the Perseus Digital Library: Text provided by Perseus Digital Library, with funding from The National Endowment for the Humanities. Original version available for viewing and download at http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/.
    The transformation of the Perseus text to an XML edition with composed Unicode was done by Giuseppe Celano. The files here are a further transformation of Celano's work.
    License CC 3.0 BY-NC-SA.

    Contents

    • lsj.cex A Cite Collection of the entries in the LSJ, with accompanying documentation of a discoverable text property extension identifying the entry property as a having a primtive type String and an extended type Markdown. URNs for the LSJ collection are, e.g. urn:cts:hmt:lsj.markdown:n51.
    • lsj.index A searchable index as tabulated lines, with # as the field delimiter. The fields are:
      1. The ID (object-selector) of an entry
      2. The entry's key (lemma) in Unicode, normalized to remove diacritical marks
      3. The entry's key (lemma) in Beta Code, normalized to remove diacritical marks
      4. A listing of all Greek words in the entry, in Beta Code without accents
    • files A directory of individual CEX fragments for each alphabetic division of the LSJ.

    Corrections

    Please submit corrections as issues in GitHub or (ideally) in the form of pull-requests.