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Open Access Journal: Ploutarchos: The Scholarly Journal of the International Plutarch Society

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Ploutarchos: The Scholarly Journal of the International Plutarch Society
ISSN: 0258-655X
Ploutarchos n.s. is an international scholarly journal devoted to research on Plutarch's works, on their value as a source for ancient history and as literary documents, and on their influence on humanism. It is directed to specialists on these topics. The principal areas of research of this journal are Classical Philology, Ancient History, and the Classical Tradition.

Contributions must be sent to the Coordinator, Prof. Aurelio Pérez Jiménez, or to the Editor, Prof. Frances Titchener, before the 30th of March of each year. Articles and notes will be published following positive evaluation by two external referees.
The full content of Volumes 1-10 (2003-2013) is available courtesy of Coimbra University Press.

See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies

Open Access Journal: DABIR: Digital Archive of Brief notes & Iran Review

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[First posted in AWOL 10 October 2014, updated 11 May 2020]

DABIR: Digital Archive of Brief notes & Iran Review
Dabir Journal
The Digital Archive of Brief notes & Iran Review (DABIR) is an open access, peer-reviewed online journal published by the Dr. Samuel M. Jordan Center for Persian Studies and Culture at the University of California, Irvine. DABIR aims to quickly and efficiently publish brief notes and reviews relating to the pre-modern world in contact with Iran and Persianate cultures. The journal accepts submissions on art history, archaeology, history, linguistics, literature, manuscript studies, numismatics, philology and religion, from Jaxartes to the Mediterranean and from the Sumerian period through to and including the Safavid era (3500 BCE-1500 CE). Work dealing with later periods can be considered on request.

Issue 07 [Special Issue: Hellenism and Iran]

Articles

Special Issue: Hellenism and Iran

Book Reivews


Scotland's Ancient Egyptian Collections

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Scotland's Ancient Egyptian Collections
From stelae to shabtis, canopic jars to Coptic cloth, immense public interest in Egyptology from the 1800s onwards has led to the development of ancient Egyptian collections across Scotland. 
As part of the Ancient Egypt and East Asia National Programme we undertook  a national review of ancient Egyptian collections in Scotland, supported by the Esmée Fairbairn Collections Fund, delivered by the Museums Association. The review highlights some of the objects and stories from these collections. It is the largest and most detailed review of Egyptian collections in Scotland, tracking around 14,000 objects from 25 organisations, spread across 50 sites.
Download the full collections review here: Ancient Egyptian Collections in Scottish Museums

Ancient Egyptian collections by region

Egypt in North East Scotland

Collections in Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire and Moray.
More

Egypt in the Highlands and Islands

Collections in Argyll and Bute, Eilean Siar, Highland, Orkney and Shetland.
More

Egypt in Tayside, Central and Fife

Collections in Angus, Clackmannanshire, Dundee City, Falkirk, Fife, Perth and Kinross and Stirling.
More

Egypt in Edinburgh and Lothians

Collections in Edinburgh, including National collections.
More

Egypt in Glasgow and Strathclyde

Collections in the west of Scotland from Inverclyde to East Ayrshire, South Lanarkshire to East Dunbartonshire.
More

Egypt in Scotland South

Collections in Dumfries and Galloway and Scottish Borders.
More

Ancient Egypt across Scotland

An incredible array of Egyptian objects can be found in museums across Scotland, from tiny amulets to massive stone monuments. National Museums Scotland and museums across the country are studying these artefacts together to improve our understanding of ancient Egyptian culture and Scotland’s contribution to Egyptology.
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Open Access Journal: Gymnasium - Supplementum Gymnasiale

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[First posted in AWOL 27 November 2017, updated 12 May 2020]

Gymnasium - Supplementum Gymnasiale

(Online Supplement to GYMNASIUM: Zeitschrift für Kultur der Antike und Humanistische Bildung [ISSN: 0342-5231])

2.  Werner Suerbaum: Sabinus und Eponine, Gymnasium 120 (2013) 19-46: Links, Bilder und Google-Resultate





7.  Anhang zu Werner Suerbaum, Germanischer Bruderstreit an der Weser. Arminius contra Flavus bei Tacitus (ann. 2,9-10) uind bei Robert Ranke-Graves - in Vorbereitung

8.  Adendum zu Ulrich Schmitzer, Examen in Liebe mit Note 1.Übersetzungen von Ovids Ars amatoria vom 15. bis zum 20. Jahrundert, Gymnasium 125 (2018) 429-468

Tappeh Sialk: the glory of ancient Kashan

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Tappeh Sialk: the glory of ancient Kashan
Nokandeh, Jebrael, John Curtis, and Marielle Pic.
London : Iran Heritage Foundation, 2019 
Special Studies (Iran Heritage Foundation), 1
ISBN:  9781916253803 1916253806
In March 2017 IHF organised what would become the first in a series of international conferences on the subject of the ancient site of Tappeh Sialk, near Kashan. The aim was to draw attention to this important pre-Achaemenid site and collectively produce recommendations of how to promote and preserve it for the future.
A report of this first conference, as well as the following conference held in March 2018, can be found on our website. The 2018 gathering was also covered by IRIB news. Most recently, in November 2019, another symposium about the work on this archaeological site was arranged, this time hosted by the Louvre in Paris. 
It had been intended that the next instalment on Tappeh Sialk would take place in Berlin, though plans for this have of course now been put on hold. We very much hope we will be able to welcome friends and scholars to another Sialk conference in the near future.
In the meantime, the papers from the first two conferences have been complied into one volume, published by IHF earlier this year and available in hardcopy (details of how to order here). We are delighted to announce that we have now also made this publication available online and welcome you take a look and learn more about this significant archaeological site.

Open Access Journal: Etruscan News

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 [First posted in AWOL 9 December 2009, updated (new URLs) 12 May 2020]

Etruscan News
The American section of the Institute for Etruscan and Italic Studies (Instituto di Studi Etruschi ed Italici) is housed at NYU under the auspices of the Center for Ancient Studies. For further information or to subscribe to the newsletter of the American section, please contact Jane Whitehead: jwhitehe@valdosta.edu
To access the Index for Etruscan News 1-14 (2002-2012), please click here.

New Research on Late Byzantine Goldsmiths’ Works (13th-15th Centuries): Neue Forschungen zur spätbyzantinischen Goldschmiedekunst (13.-15. Jahrhundert)

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New Research on Late Byzantine Goldsmiths’ Works (13th-15th Centuries): Neue Forschungen zur spätbyzantinischen Goldschmiedekunst (13.-15. Jahrhundert)
Antje Bosselmann-Ruickbie (Hrsg.) 
Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident
ISBN 978-3-948465-55-1 (PDF)
 New Research on Late Byzantine Goldsmiths’ Works (13th-15th Centuries)
 
Dieser Band umfasst 13 Vorträge der Konferenz »New Research on Late Byzantine Goldsmiths‘ Works (13th-15th Centuries) – Neue Forschungen zur spätbyzantinischen Goldschmiedekunst (13.-15. Jahrhundert)«, die im Oktober 2015 im Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseum in Mainz stattfand. Die Beiträge beschäftigen sich mit der materiellen Kultur der spätbyzantinischen Goldschmiedekunst, z.B. Kreuze, Reliquiare, Schmuck, Emailarbeiten und Edelsteine, und spannen einen weiten geographischen Rahmen von Byzanz zu vielen seiner Nachbarn wie Russland, Trapezunt, Serbien und Kreta. Darüber hinaus liefern schriftliche Quellen zu byzantinischen Goldschmieden, ihrem Handwerk und der Herkunft von Edelmetallen Hinweise auf die Goldschmiedekunst in Byzanz während seiner langen Geschichte.

Inhaltsverzeichnis
PDF
Titelei
Table of Contents
Antje Bosselmann-Ruickbie
Foreword by the editor
Andreas Rhoby
Gold, Goldsmiths and Goldsmithing in Byzantium
Paul Hetherington
Late Byzantine Enamel: A Period of Transition
Olga Shashina
Two Little-Known Pre-Mongolian Cloisonné Enamel Medallions in the Moscow Kremlin Armoury Collection: On the Peculiarities of Denominative Inscriptions of the Virgin in the Art of Pre-Mongolian Rus’
Martin Dennert
Displaying an Icon: The Mosaic Icon of Saint Demetrios at Sassoferrato and its Frame
Sabrina Schäfer
Neue Forschungen zum Trapezunt-Kästchen und seiner Datierung
Anastassios Antonaras
Late Byzantine Jewellery from Thessaloniki and its Region: The Finds from Ippodromiou 1 Street and Other Excavations
Antje Steinert
Late Byzantine Accessories and Jewellery: New Thoughts on the Small Finds from Mystras
Jessica Schmidt
Darstellungen von Schmuck in der spätbyzantinischen Wandmalerei Kretas
Nikos D. Kontogiannis, Vana Orfanou
The Chalcis Treasure: A 14th-15th Century Hoard from Euboea, Greece – First Thoughts and Preliminary Results
Holger Kempkens
Zur Rezeption westlich-lateinischer Goldschmiedekunst im spätbyzantinischen Kulturraum
Irina A. Sterligova
14th-Century Gold Pendilia on a Byzantine Icon of the Hodegetria from the Moscow Kremlin Museums
Vesna Bikić
Beyond Jewellery: Archers’ Rings in the Medieval Balkans (14th-15th Centuries)
Martina Horn
»The Incredulity of Saint Thomas« on a Byzantine Sapphire from the Cheapside Hoard, London: A Proposal for a New Dating to the Palaiologan Period
Sigles Used

(Partially) Open Access Journal: Water History

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Water History
Electronic ISSN: 1877-7244
Print ISSN: 1877-7236
 
The general purpose of the Water History is to encourage, promote, and foster historical understanding of the relationship between water and humankind. As water has influenced the development of human communities throughout the world, the study of water contributes to our understanding of economic, political, social, and environmental history, the history of science, medicine, technology, environmental sciences, and geography.
To reflect the wide range of academic disciplines involved in the growing field of water history, Water History seeks to foster cross-disciplinary discussion of ideas, methods, and experience so as to illuminate the complex processes that have shaped water resource use and thus reveal interrelated historical contingencies and precedents. The management of the world’s water supplies remains of critical concern to scholars, policymakers, and resource managers; as such, deepening our understanding of how past human societies used and related to water informs current debates on water management.
The history of water use can be a deeply political issue. Conflicts over the control and use of water have varied both historically and geographically, often crossing cultural, geographical, and institutional boundaries. In recognition of the complexity and sometimes contradictory aims and ideologies of those controlling water resources, Water History will provide a forum for peer-reviewed research in the field of water history and management. The journal will foster effective links between scholars engaged in water history research in the humanities and social sciences as well as the natural and applied sciences.

  1. Article
    Open Access

    The unconquerable country: the Babylonian marshes in the Neo-Assyrian sources

    The Assyrians ruled in the first half of the first millennium BCE over most part of the Ancient Near East. The Neo-Assyrian Empire was constructed on the base of a powerful, well organized and trained army, wh...
  2. Article
    Open Access

    “Cool and tasty waters”: managing Naples’s water supply, c. 1500–c. 1750

    Although Naples was one of Europe’s largest cities (after London and Paris), studies of the management of its water supply during the early modern period are sorely lacking, despite growing interest in the sub...
  3. Article
    Open Access

    Evolution of the dry zone water harvesting and management systems in Sri Lanka during the Anuradhapura Kingdom; a study based on ancient chronicles and lithic inscriptions

    A significant number of written sources report on the development of ancient dry zone water harvesting and water management systems in Sri Lanka. This paper attempts to address the lack of a systematic assessm...
  4. Article
    Open Access

    Modelling the freshwater supply of cisterns in ancient Greece

    In this paper, we model the function of rainwater harvesting cisterns in ancient Greece. The model calculates on a monthly basis: (1) the collected and stored volume of water; (2) the amount of water extracted...
  5. Article
    Open Access

    Correction to: The sanctuaries of the Rain God in the Mixtec Highlands, Mexico: a review from the present to the precolonial past

    The name of the project director and the funding source were in part incorrectly reflected in the Acknowledgments section and are hereby corrected as follows: The research leading to these results forms part o...
  6. Article
    Open Access

    The sustainability of ancient water control techniques in Iran: an overview

    Qanats are a traditional source of water management that exists throughout much of the Middle East, and extending into North Africa, Spain and South Asia. In particular, they have played an impor...
  7. Article
    Open Access

    Luminescence dating of qanat technology: prospects for further development

    With few exceptions in which dating is implied by indirect association with adjacent settlements or incorporation of diagnostic artefacts in upcast sediment, individual qanats have proven very difficult to dat...
  8. Article
    Open Access

    Instituting water research: the Water Resources Research Act (1964) and the Idaho Water Resources Research Institute

    In 1964, Congress passed the Water Resources Research Act (WRRA) and created state research institutes to pursue practical research for the nation’s growing water problems. The Idaho Water Resources Research I...
  9. Article
    Open Access

    “Muddying the waters: recreational conflict and rights of use of British rivers”

    Rivers have historically been spaces of recreation, in addition to work, trade, and sustenance. Today, multiple groups (anglers, canoeists, rowers, swimmers) vie for the recreational use of rivers in Britain. ...
  10. Article
    Open Access

    Ice and water. The removal of ice on waterways in the Low Countries, 1330–1800

    This paper looks into the blocking of ice on Dutch and Belgian rivers and canals during the Little Ice Age and how this has affected shipping and other economic activities. The key issue here is how contempora...
  11. Article
    Open Access

    The Water Act, No. 54 of 1956 and the first phase of apartheid in South Africa (1948–1960)

    After the formation of the Union of South Africa in 1910 the government department responsible for water governance, in terms of the Irrigation and Conservation of Water Act, No. 8 of 1912 went by the name of the...
  12. Article
    Open Access

    Between arguments, interests and expertise: the institutional development of the Dutch water boards, 1953-present

    The Dutch water boards perform essential tasks for the Netherlands and generally effectively, yet they have often been called old-fashioned, ineffective and expensive. This paper describes and analyses the dis...
  13. Article
    Open Access

    De-colonizing water. Dispossession, water insecurity, and Indigenous claims for resources, authority, and territory

    Set against the background of struggles for territory, livelihood, and dignified existence in Latin America’s neoliberal conjuncture, this paper examines contemporary Andean Indigenous claims for water access ...
  14. Article
    Open Access

    The sanctuaries of the Rain God in the Mixtec Highlands, Mexico: a review from the present to the precolonial past

    This article focuses on the sanctuaries of the Rain God through time, paying particular attention to the devastations and the consequences that these sacred places suffered due to the colonization carried out ...
  15. Article
    Open Access

    The rise and fall of Munich’s early modern water network: a tale of prowess and power

    Until the 19th century, not just the Isar River and its natural branches but also the “Stadtbäche”, artificial canals, provided Munich with water for drinking, commerce, waste discharge, defense, ostentatious ...
  16. Article
    Open Access

    Using and abusing a torrential urban river: the Wien River before and during industrialization

    The Wien River is the largest tributary of the Viennese Danube and was a center of urban production during industrialization. It’s highly dynamic flow regime with small average discharge as well as recurrent b...
  17. Article
    Open Access

    The long-term evolution of urban waters and their nineteenth century transformation in European cities. A comparative environmental history

    The nineteenth century was marked by a fundamental change in city-river relations. The environmental history perspective employed in this article illustrates how the complex interplay between the diverse natur...
  18. Article
    Open Access

    How water and its use shaped the spatial development of Vienna

    Telling an environmental history of Vienna’s urban waters, this paper advocates the compound study of the evolution of fluvial and urban form. It traces the structural permanence of diverse types of running wa...
  19. Article
    Open Access

    Water supply of ancient Egyptian settlements: the role of the state. Overview of a relatively equitable scheme from the Old to New Kingdom (ca. 2543–1077 BC)

    The study of the textual and archaeological evidence shows that the water supply of the settlements of ancient Egypt seems to have worked on a simple and a relatively equitable scheme, at least from the Old Ki...
  20. Article
    Open Access

    Europe’s Rhine power: connections, borders, and flows

    This article explores the pivotal position of the river Rhine in the gradual development of a European electricity system. Although the general image of the Rhine is one of a inland transport corridor, it also...

  1. Article
    Open Access

    A niche construction approach on the central Netherlands covering the last 220,000 years

    This paper shows what a niche construction theory (NCT) approach can contribute to the long-term social and environmental history of an area when applied to both sedentary and non-sedentary communities. To und...
  2. Article
    Open Access

    Long term effects of climate on human adaptation in the middle Gila River Valley, Arizona, America

    The Hohokam, an irrigation-based society in the American South West, used the river valleys of the Salt and Gila Rivers between 500 and 1500 AD to grow their crops. Such irrigated crops are linking human agenc...
  3. Article
    Open Access

    Commodifying snow, taming the waters. Socio-ecological niche construction in an Alpine village

    White belts of snow clad mountains all over the world each winter. Even if there is no snow, the tourism industry is able to produce the white finery at the push of the button, thereby consuming large amounts ...
  4. Article
    Open Access

    How geoarchaeology and landscape archaeology contribute to niche construction theory (NCT)

    In this paper a review is given of examples of geoarchaeological and landscape archaeological research from four locations throughout Europe. Case-studies from the North Sea coastal zone in the Netherlands and...
  5. Article
    Open Access

    Reconsidering the water system of Roman Barcino (Barcelona) from supply to discharge

    This paper presents the results of the ‘Roman Barcino Water Network’ Project. This study employed a series of methodologies aiming at joining and interpreting all data available on water supply, distribution, ...
  6. Article
    Open Access

    Looking at half a millennium of co-existence: the Danube in Vienna as a socio-natural site

    Which insights can be gained from a long-term study for river management today? Vienna’s layout and city budget are still influenced by interventions undertaken in the 19th century or even earlier. This introd...
  7. Article
    Open Access

    Floods, fights and a fluid river: the Viennese Danube in the sixteenth century

    Alluvial rivers can show unpredictable channel changes and humans living along the river corridor repeatedly have to cope with the alterations of their physical environment. This was specifically the case in t...
  8. Article
    Open Access

    Feeding and cleaning the city: the role of the urban waterscape in provision and disposal in Vienna during the industrial transformation

    This article presents an integrated socio-ecological perspective on the changing interrelations between Vienna’s “urban metabolism” and the river Danube during the industrial transformation in the nineteenth c...
  9. Article
    Open Access

    Urban land for a growing city at the banks of a moving river: Vienna's spread into the Danube island Unterer Werd from the late 17th to the beginning of the 20th century

    In the relation between urban development and the Viennese Danube different periods can be identified from the late 17th to the early 20th century. These periods were strongly intertwined with both the history...
  10. Article
    Open Access

    Two steps back, one step forward: reconstructing the dynamic Danube riverscape under human influence in Vienna

    As part of an interdisciplinary project on the environmental history of the Viennese Danube, the past river landscape was reconstructed. This article describes the different types of historical sources used fo...
  11. Article
    Open Access

    Changes in water and land: the reconstructed Viennese riverscape from 1500 to the present

    Medieval Vienna was situated at the main arm of the swiftly flowing alpine Danube. From the fourteenth century onwards, the river gradually moved away from the city. This marked the beginning of 500 years of h...
  12. Article
    Open Access

    Ethnicity and aquatic lifestyles: exploring Southeast Asia’s past and present seascapes

    This study explores the profound maritime dimension in Southeast Asia’s past and present. It highlights the region’s “sea people”, giving special attention to their complex and dynamic interactions with terres...
  13. Article
    Open Access

    Variations in discharge from the Qilian mountains, northwest China, and its effect on the agricultural communities of the Heihe basin, over the last two millennia

    Over the last two millennia, agricultural land in the Hei river basin, northwest China, has been subjected to a series of significant droughts and flood events. These documented hydrological events were compar...
  14. Article
    Open Access

    Editorial

  15. Article
    Open Access

    Editorial

  16. Article
    Open Access

    Martin M. Melosi, Precious commodity. Providing water for America’s cities

  17. Article
    Open Access

    Robert Lawrence France (ed): Wetlands of mass destruction. Ancient presage for contemporary ecocide in southern Iraq

  18. Article
    Open Access

    Editorial Issue 1 Volume 3, 2011

  19. Article
    Open Access

    Stefania Barca 2010 Enclosing water: Nature and political economy in a Mediterranean valley, 1796–1916

  20. Article
    Open Access

    Book Reviews

  1. Article
    Open Access

    Structuring properties of irrigation systems: understanding relations between humans and hydraulics through modeling

    Irrigation systems were clearly important in ancient times in supplying crops with water. This requires physical distribution facilities and socio-political arrangements to coordinate between actors. Resulting...
  2. Article
    Open Access

    Cesare Rossi, Flavio Russo, and Ferruccio Russo: Ancient engineers’ inventions. Precursors of the present. History of mechanism and machine science

  3. Article
    Open Access

    Chandra Mukerji: Impossible engineering. Technology and territoriality on the Canal du Midi

  4. Article
    Open Access

    Editorial

  5. Article
    Open Access

    Water, health and the body: the tide, undercurrent and surge of meanings

    Water has meaning for health, illness and wellbeing. Central themes of meaning can be identified consistently throughout history, sometimes easily discernible, while at other times more difficult to identify. ...
  6. Article
    Open Access

    Water history and the modern

  7. Article
    Open Access

    Joseph W. Dellapenna and Joyeeta Gupta (eds.): The evolution of the law and politics of water

  8. Article
    Open Access

    Where has the water come from?

  9. Article
    Open Access

    Capturing the waters: the hydraulic mission in the Lerma–Chapala Basin, Mexico (1876–1976)

    The hydraulic mission of the Mexican federal government, embodied in its hydraulic bureaucracy (hydrocracy), led to the centralization of water development and the creation of water overexploitation in the Ler...

See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies

Open Access Journal: Arkhaia Anatolika Anadolu Arkeolojisi Araştırmaları Dergisi

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Arkhaia Anatolika Anadolu Arkeolojisi Araştırmaları Dergisi
e-ISSN: 2651-4664

Arkhaia Anatolika, Anadolu Arkeolojisi Araştırmaları Dergisi’nin ilgi sahasını tamamen Anadolu Arkeolojisi üzerine yapılan çalışmalar oluşturmaktadır. Asya ile Avrupa kıtası arasında bir köprü oluşturan Anadolu, tarih boyunca pek çok kültüre ev sahipliği yapmış, bunun sonucunda zengin bir kültür birikimine sahip olmuştur
Arkhaia Anatolika Dergisi, uygarlığın gelişmesine öncülük eden Anadolu coğrafyasının tarihi ve kültürel geçmişini aydınlatacak akademik çalışmaların yayınlanmasına katkıda bulunmayı amaç edinmektedir. Bu bağlamda dergi, Antropoloji, Prehistorya, Protohistorya, Klasik Arkeoloji, Klasik Filoloji, Eski Çağ Dilleri ve Kültürleri, Eskiçağ Tarihi, Nümizmatik, Erken Hristiyanlık ve Bizans Sanatı alanlarında yazılmış, özgün sonuçlar içeren makaleleri kapsamaktadır.
Arkhaia Anatolika: The Journal of Anatolian Archaeological Studies is focused on research conducted in Anatolian Archaeology. Anatolia, which constitutes a bridge between Asia and Europe, is the site of numerous cultures with a rich cultural history. Arkhaia Anatolika aspires to publish academic work that will enlighten the historical and cultural background of Anatolia which opened the path for the development of civilizations. In this context, the journal covers articles containing the results of original research in the fields of anthropology, prehistory, protohistory, classical archaeology, classical philology, ancient languages and cultures, ancient history, numismatics, early Christianity and Byzantine art.

Knidos Teritoryumunda Bulunmuş Bir Aslan Heykeli: “Knidos Yaka Aslanı”

  Ertekin M. DOKSANALTI
Geliş Tarihi : 07.02.2020 | Kabul Tarihi : 18.02.2020
DOI : 10.32949/Arkhaia.2020.13 | Yayın Tarihi : 21.2.2020 12:27:49

Stratonikeia Teritoryumundan Elit Mezarları

  Aytekin BÜYÜKÖZER
Geliş Tarihi : 02.03.2020 | Kabul Tarihi : 31.03.2020
DOI : 10.32949/Arkhaia.2020.14 | Yayın Tarihi : 2.4.2020 14:07:24

Tire Müzesinden Bir Grup Fibula

  Emre ERDAN
Geliş Tarihi : 13.03.2020 | Kabul Tarihi : 25.04.2020
DOI : 10.32949/Arkhaia.2020.15 | Yayın Tarihi : 2.4.2020 14:49:59

Thyateira/Hastane Höyüğü’nde Bulunan Anadolu Parsı Heykel Parçası Üzerine Düşünceler

  Aydın ERÖN
Geliş Tarihi : 18.03.2020 | Kabul Tarihi : 06.04.2020
DOI : 10.32949/Arkhaia.2020.16 | Yayın Tarihi : 13.4.2020 10:38:49

Antik Çağ’dan Günümüze Çift Başlı Kartal: Anlamı, Yorumu ve Propagandası

  Ramazan ÖZGAN
Geliş Tarihi : 06.04.2020 | Kabul Tarihi : 30.04.2020
DOI : 10.32949/Arkhaia.2020.17 | Yayın Tarihi : 6.5.2020 11:38:54

Anadolu Dor Mimarisinde Kullanılan Anta, Pilaster ve Paye Başlıkları

  Zeliha GİDER BÜYÜKÖZER
Geliş Tarihi : 03.03.2020 | Kabul Tarihi : 11.05.2020
DOI : 10.32949/Arkhaia.2020.18 | Yayın Tarihi : 12.5.2020 12:40:19

See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies

Video Archive: Melammu Symposium Talks Available

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Video Archive: Melammu Symposium Talks Available
[via e-mail]
Dear Friends of the Pourdavoud Center for the Study of the Iranian World,
We are pleased to announce the availability of the first two presentations from the Fourteenth Melammu Symposium, Contextualizing Iranian Religions in the Ancient World.” This international symposium was hosted by the Pourdavoud Center in Royce Hall on February 18–20, 2020, and highlights the research of 26 contributors, organized into six panels and two keynote addresses.

The first two videos feature the talks of UCLA’s own Professor Emerita Elizabeth Carter and Professor Simonetta Ponchia (University of Verona), Chair of the Melammu Board.
During the last half of the second millennium BCE, the Middle Elamite (c 1600–1500–1000 BCE) kings built a number of temples both in Khuzestan and the central Zagros. Inscribed baked bricks used in their construction describe the various types of religious buildings, the divinities to whom they are dedicated, and sometimes specify their decorations and furnishings (Potts 2010). The later Middle Elamite rulers appear particularly active in this endeavor. The excavations at Kabnak (Haft Tepe) and Al-Untash Napirisha (Chogha Zanbil) have revealed craft production areas within their sacred precincts. Administrative texts from Kabnak and Anšan (Tal-e Malyan) record the receipt and disbursement of metals, some destined for the production for temple furnishings. This fragmentary data suggests that the demand for minerals and other luxury items during the Late Bronze Age led to the establishment by the crown of a network of strategically located temples that allowed the late Middle Elamite rulers to control key points between Susa and the central Zagros and thus to exploit the mineral resources of the Persian Gulf and the Iranian highlands.

Recorded: February 18, 2020
Event: Contextualizing Iranian Religions in the Ancient World
by Elizabeth Carter (University of California, Los Angeles)
Crafting under Divine Protection During the Middle Elamite Period
The Assyrian empire is of great renown as a machine of conquest, but its most innovative feature was the implementation of an efficacious administrative system that transformed subjected kingdoms into provinces, an innovation that was replicated by later empires. Although it is hard to assess the degree of cohesion in this complex structure, it is worthwhile to examine the extant traces of a policy that was responsible for the dissemination, inclusion, and standardization of principles and procedures that shaped the attitudes of both administrators and subjects. Temples and offices in peripheral towns, as well as cults, ceremonies, and legal practices, were the main vehicles in imposing an Assyrian imperial culture. This paper examines a number of case studies that are relevant to our assessment of this administrative system, its development through time, and its impact on later empires.

Recorded: February 18, 2020
Event: Contextualizing Iranian Religions in the Ancient World
by Simonetta Ponchia (University of Verona)
Channels and Methods of Diffusion of Administrative Models and Imperial Ideology
About the Fourteenth Melammu Symposium
The Pourdavoud Center for the Study of the Iranian World convened the 14th Melammu Symposium, “Contextualizing Iranian Religions in the Ancient World,” at UCLA on February 18-20, 2020. The international three-day symposium held at Royce Hall explored Iranian religions in light of ancient Near Eastern traditions and precedents. It hosted scholars whose work pertains to the interchange of ideas and practices between the ancient Near East, Egypt, the Classical and Hellenistic worlds, and ancient Iran. The overarching themes of the symposium encompassed: Elam, the Ancient Near East, and Persia; Ancient Egypt and Persia; the Divine in Achaemenid Material Culture; (Post-)Achaemenid Religious Practices in Literary Traditions; Religions and Religious Policy in the Hellenistic and Arsacid Worlds; and the Religious Landscape of the Sasanian World.

About the Melammu Project and Symposia
The main aim of the Melammu Project is to investigate the continuity, transformation, and diffusion of Mesopotamian and ancient Near Eastern cultures from the third millennium BCE until the rise of Islam and beyond. The Melammu Symposia provide a forum, in which the cultural continuity and transformation in the ancient world may be assessed systematically in the longue durée. While the Melammu Symposia typically concentrate on discrete themes, their emphasis remains on cross-cultural perspectives and the continued interchange of ideas between specialists in different disciplines.
Pourdavoud Center Video Archive
The Pourdavoud Center expertly records, as part of its video series, all academic lectures for the sake of disseminating their content widely. A major initiative of the Pourdavoud Center is to allow open access to research undertaken under its auspices, and videographic records of its events, to a global audience.
Recent videos added to the archive include:
Recorded: March 11, 2020
Event: Biennial Ehsan Yarshater Center Lecture Series
by Daniel Potts (New York University)
Feudalism and its Characteristics in Ancient Iran
Recorded: March 9, 2020
Event: Biennial Ehsan Yarshater Center Lecture Series
by Daniel Potts (New York University)
Descent and Marriage in Achaemenid Iran
About the Center
Established in 2017 as the premier research center for the study of ancient Iran, the mission of the Pourdavoud Center for the Study of the Iranian World is to engage in transformative research on all aspects of Iranian antiquity, including its reception in the medieval and modern periods, by expanding on the traditional domains of Old Iranian studies and promoting cross-cultural and interdisciplinary scholarship.

Open Access Journal: Comptabilité(S) : revue d'histoire des comptabilités

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[First posted in AWOL 4 July 2016, updated 14 May 2020]

Comptabilité(S) : revue d'histoire des comptabilités
ISSN: 1775-3554
Présentation
La revue accueille toute recherche portant sur l’histoire et l’archéologie des documents comptables, des institutions qui les commanditent et des personnes qui les réalisent. Elle reçoit dossiers thématiques, articles de fonds et méthodologiques, éditions commentées de documents, comptes-rendus de thèses, de rencontres et d’ouvrages, notes d’actualités. Elle publie des textes dans toutes les langues européennes et les accompagne de résumés en français, anglais, allemand, espagnol.

Numéros en texte intégral

Open Access Journal: Aestimatio: Critical Reviews in the History of Science

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[First posted in AWOL 15 October 2009. Most recently updated 14 May 2020]

Aestimatio: Critical Reviews in the History of Science
ISSN: 1549–4497 (online)
ISSN: 1549–4470 (print) 
Aestimatio provides critical, timely assessments of books published in the history of what was called science from antiquity up to the early modern period in cultures ranging from Spain to India, and from Africa to northern Europe. The aim is to allow reviewers the opportunity to engage critically both the results of research in the history of science and how these results are obtained.

Robert Hannah The Inscriptions of the Antikythera Mechanism by AMRG 1-9
Eileen Reeves Hermes and the Telescope: In the Crucible of Galileo’€™s Life-World by Paolo Palmieri 10-18
Glen Van Brummelen Essays on Medieval Computational Astronomy by José Chabás and Bernard R. Goldstein 19-25
Fernando Q. Gouvêa Research in the History and Philosophy of Mathematics: The CHSPM 2014 Annual Meeting in St. Catherine’s, Ontario by Maria Zack and Elaine Landry edd. 26-29
Richard Lorch Islamic Astronomy and Geography by David A. King 30-31
Roger Beck Recherches Mithriaques. Quarante ans de questions et d’investigations by Robert Turcan 32-36
Matjaž Vesel Before Copernicus and Copernicus 37-79
Harry Hine Metaphorical Coherence: Studies in Seneca’s Epistulae Morales by Aron Sjöblad 80-84
Joshua J. Reynolds Divination and Human Nature: A Cognitive History of Intuition in Classical Antiquity by Peter T. Struck 85-92
Fabio Tutrone La rivoluzione culturale di Lucrezio. Filosofia e scienza nell’antica Roma by Marco Beretta 93-100
Levente László The Daimon in Hellenistic Astrology: Origins and Influence by Dorian Gieseler Greenbaum 101-114
Jacqueline Feke The Circulation of Astronomical Knowledge in the Ancient World by John M. Steele 115-118
Satyanad Kichenassamy Les mathématiques de l’autel védique. Le Baudhāyana Śulbasūtra et son commentaireŚulbadīpikā by Jean-Michel Delire 119-140
Nicola Polloni The Attitude of the Medieval Latin Translators towards the Arabic Sciences by José Martínez Gázquez 141-144
William Wians Aristotle on Knowledge and Learning: The Posterior Analytics by David Bronstein 145-153
Malcolm Wilson Plutarch’s Science of Natural Problems: A Study with Commentary on Quaestiones Naturales by Michiel Meeussen 154-157
Paul T. Keyser Science in the Forest, Science in the Past by Geoffrey Lloyd and Aparecida Vilaça edd. 158-176
Philip Thibodeau The Metaphysics of the Pythagorean Theorem: Thales, Pythagoras, Engineering, Diagrams, and the Construction of the Cosmos out of Right Triangles by Robert Hahn 177-184

Open Access Journal: International Association for Coptic Studies, NEWSLETTER / BULLETIN D'INFORMATION

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 [First posted in AWOL 12 March 2011, updated 14 May 2020]

International Association for Coptic Studies, NEWSLETTER / BULLETIN D'INFORMATION
The IACS publishes a Newsletter as an organ of information about Coptologists and their work. It is sent without charge to all members. Thirty-seven issues (with some special appendices) were published between 1976 and 1998. Copies of back issues are available to members upon request.



The Newsletter regularly publishes: (a) news about the Congresses of Coptic Studies and meetings of the IACS board; (b) the list of names and addresses of IACS members; (c) lists of publications in preparation, forthcoming, or recently published, as announced by members.

    Open Access Journal: AIA New York Society Newsletter

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    AIA New York Society Newsletter

    Past issues of our biannual newsletter can be downloaded here. Current members receive copies of the latest issue in the mail every winter and fall.
    Join the New York Society of the AIA and receive every new issue, hot off the presses!

    January 2020 Issue

    • THE PRESIDENT’S LETTER: New Year and New Beginnings (Jeffrey Lamia)
    • AIA-NY Society Scholars, 2019–20 Announced
    • AIA-NY Society Scholars’ Research (Kelly McLafferty, Max Meyer, Christina Stefanou, and Dylan G.Winchell)
    • ARCE: For New York’s “Ancient” Organizations, Entwined Pasts Become Present (Louise Bertini)

    September 2019 Issue

    • THE PRESIDENT’S LETTER: Frontiers: Lucius Aelius, Scotland and Layers of Time (Jeffrey Lamia)
    • Guardamar del Segura, Spain (Heidi James-Fisher)
    • Dr. Larissa Bonfante: Etruscans on Morningside Heights (Edward Krowitz and Jeffrey Lamia)
    • New AIA-NYS Scholarships

    ⬇︎ Download PDF

    January 2019 Issue

    • THE PRESIDENT’S LETTER: Understanding & Method: Archaeology and History (Jeffrey Lamia)
    • Heritage Matters: Afghanistan (Heidi James-Fisher)
    • NYC Archaeological Repository: The Nan A. Rothschild Research Center (Amanda Sutphin)

    ⬇︎ Download PDF

    September 2018 Issue

    • THE PRESIDENT’S LETTER:  Life on the Frontier – Past and Present (Jeffrey Lamia)
    • Mapping Magan (Eli Dollarhide)
    • Excavations at Coriglia
 and the Necropoli Crocifisso del Tufo,
 Summer 2018 (Tina Bekkali-Poio)
    • AIA Fellowships, Grants, and Scholarships

    ⬇︎ Download PDF

    January 2018 Issue

    • THE PRESIDENT’S LETTER:  Winter – Archaeological Exploration (Jeffrey Lamia)
    • Finding North American Artifacts on Social Media (Acacia Berry)
    • Contemporary Applications of Radiocarbon Dating in Archaeology (Joseph Schuldenrein)

    ⬇︎ Download PDF

    September 2017 Issue

    • THE PRESIDENT’S LETTER:  Discovery! Archaeological Discovery! (Jeffrey Lamia)
    • Report from Geneva: The Repatriation of a Roman Sarcophagus
 (Heidi James-Fisher)
    • Waldbaum Scholarship Report: Field School at Hadrian’s Villa, Summer 2017
 (Nathan Katkin)
    • LiDAR and the Revolution in Archaeological Remote Sensing (Joseph Schuldenrein)
    • Something Fishy in Tunisia (Elizabeth Bartman)

    ⬇︎ Download PDF

    January 2017 Issue

    • THE PRESIDENT’S LETTER: Ringing in an Exciting New Year! (Jeffrey Lamia)
    • Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
 (Joseph Schuldenrein)
    • New Publication of Note
    • Schnaderbeck’s Lager Cellar: A Glimpse into Brooklyn’s Beer-Brewing Past
 (Celia Bergoffen)

    ⬇︎ Download PDF

    September 2016 Issue

    • THE PRESIDENT’S LETTER: A New Lecture Season, and a Changing of the Guard (Paula Kay Lazrus)
    • New Treats for Egyptologists in New York
    • Hunter College Bloom Scholars Cohort in Greece
 (Robert Koehl)
    • Umm al-Aqarib: Excavations in an Ancient Sumerian City
 (Haider Oraibi Almamori)

    ⬇︎ Download PDF

    January 2016 Issue

    • THE PRESIDENT’S LETTER: Our Lectures Will Take You Around the Globe (Paula Kay Lazrus)
    • New York Society Initiates A Field Work Scholarship
    • Discovering Homo naledi: A First-Hand Account of an Extraordinary Find (Hannah Morris)

    ⬇︎ Download PDF

    September 2015 Issue

    • THE PRESIDENT’S LETTER: A Busy Year Ahead! (But Busy in a Good Way) (Paula Kay Lazrus)
    • Mapping Mesopotamian Monuments (Zainab Bahrani)
    • 4,000 Years Under The Volcano: Archaeological Excavation at Stromboli (Sara T. Levi, with contributions by Sabina Slade, Vlora Gerguri, Brian Edwards, and Valerie Long)

    ⬇︎ Download PDF

    See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies

     

    TITULUS: Corpus des inscriptions de la France médiévale

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    TITULUS: Corpus des inscriptions de la France médiévale

    TITULUS est un projet d’épigraphie médiévale numérique élaboré par l’équipe du Corpus des inscriptions de la France médiévale (CIFM) au Centre d’études supérieures de civilisation médiévale (CESCM) de Poitiers. Son but est de proposer une nouvelle diffusion accessible à tous des sources épigraphiques du VIIIe au XVe siècle du territoire français et de nouveaux moyens d'exploitation de ces textes, à travers :
    Depuis 1974, le Corpus des inscriptions de la France médiévale recense, publie et étudie les inscriptions du Moyen Âge tracées sur bois, sur pierre ou sur métal et conservées dans les églises ou autres bâtiments.
    Les trois quarts de la France sont désormais couverts (66 départements, 8 régions). L’Est, le Nord et la région parisienne seront les grands chantiers à venir. Ces quarante ans d’édition s’accompagnent d’autant d’années d’études d’épigraphie médiévale, d’enseignement et de développement de la discipline, qui permettent aujourd’hui de réviser les anciens tomes et de proposer des Hors-Séries thématiques en complément de la collection habituelle.


    Équipe


    Responsables du projet :
    • Estelle Ingrand-Varenne, chargée de recherche au CNRS ;
    • Clara Renedo Mirambell, doctorante à l'École nationale des chartes / Université Paris 3.
    Collaborateurs :
    • Vincent Debiais, chargé de recherche au CNRS ;
    • Cécile Treffort, professeur d'histoire à l'université de Poitiers.
    • Alexandre Gaudin, étudiant de Master 2 à l'École nationale des chartes (prom. 2018).

    Aphrodisias Regional Survey Repository

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    Aphrodisias Regional Survey Repository
    The collection's logo
    Aphrodisias is one of the most important archaeological sites of the Greek and Roman periods in Turkey, famous in antiquity for its sanctuary of Aphrodite and its virtuoso sculptors. Excavations at Aphrodisias have been carried out by New York University since 1961 and have revealed an unusually well-preserved and picturesque ancient town, which makes an indelible impression on visitors and brings the civic culture of the Graeco-Roman world vividly to life.
    Until recently, however, modern knowledge of ancient Aphrodisias extended only as far as the city’s fortification walls. Very little attention had been paid to the monuments outside the gates—beginning with the suburban roads and cemeteries—or to the study of the relationship between the urban settlement and its rural environs. Although the excavations had revealed one of the world’s best-preserved ancient cities, important questions about the history of the city had remained unanswered.
    The Aphrodisias Regional Survey was begun in 2005 in order to investigate the interaction between human habitation and the natural environment in an 800-square-kilometer area around Aphrodisias from prehistory to the present day, especially in the Hellenistic and Roman periods. Major fieldwork combining intensive and non-intensive archaeological survey and geological and geographical investigation was completed in 2009. Approximately 700 archaeological points of interest have been recorded and entered into a Geographical Information System (GIS), including tombs, farmsteads and settlements, caves, wine and olive oil presses, quarries, aqueducts and cisterns, rural sanctuaries and churches, and a network of fortified citadels and hilltop watchtowers. The work has been sponsored by New York University and the University of Michigan, with major financial support from the Leon Levy Foundation.
    The excavations at Aphrodisias have made significant contributions to the history of the ancient Mediterranean city. Regional survey has extended our knowledge of the site in both time and space--providing new information about Aphrodisias and environs before and after the heyday of the city and illuminating the interaction between town and countryside in numerous ways.
    The results of the Aphrodisias Regional Survey have been published in C. Ratté and P.D. De Staebler, eds., Aphrodisias V. The Aphrodisias Regional Survey (Verlag Philipp von Zabern: Darmstadt/Mainz, 2012). The purpose of the present collection is to provide electronic access to: (1) the entire catalogue of archaeological points of interest recorded by the survey; the complete photographic archive; high-resolution scans of all the hand-drawn architectural drawings; high-resolution versions of all the digital maps and plans; (2) the entire catalogue of all the contexts targeted for systematic collection of surface finds; and (3) the entire intensive (transect) survey database, including all the data recorded for each subtransect of the survey. For an explanation of the organization of the databases and of the basic survey methods, see Aphrodisias V, pages 16-21.
    The main survey database (1) may be accessed from this page. It consists of individual records for each archaeological point of interest, with thumbnail links to relevant images, together with individual records for each of the maps summarizing the results of the survey. The maps may be found by searching for the word “Map” in the title of the record. The context (2) and transect (3) databases may be downloaded by clicking on the following links: Aphrodisias Regional Survey Context Database and Aphrodisias Regional Survey Transect Database.

    NELC University of Chicago Dissertations in Knowledge@UChicago

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    NELC University of Chicago Dissertations in Knowledge@UChicago

    1.
    This dissertation is a study of the life and work of Zayn al-Dīn al-Khwāfī (d. 838/1435), a Suhrawardī Sufi of Herat active during the late fourteenth and early fifte [...]
    2019-12 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    2.
    In 1670, Bīdel of Delhi was travelling through northern India. One night in Agra he had a visionary dream that would reframe and reconsolidate his entire life: he experi [...]
    2019-08 | South Asian Languages and Civilizations; Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    3.
    This dissertation offers the first in-depth study of racial difference, and specifically blackness, in premodern Arabic popular literature. I base my study primarily on t [...]
    2019-08 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    4.
    Despite widespread agreement that narratives of divine combat with monstrous antagonists were politically and culturally important in the ancient Near East, scholars have [...]
    2019-08 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    5.
    This dissertation examines the creation of a “state public sphere” (Rus. obshchestvennost’, Uzb. jamoatchilik), or a nexus of state-sponsored mass institutions and [...]
    2019-08 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations; History | Dissertation
    6.
    This research contributes new approaches and readings of the history and thought of the early Nizari Ismailis and their polity in Iran (fl. 1090-1256/483-654). Previous s [...]
    2019-06 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    7.
    This dissertation examines ʿAṭṭâr’s didactic mas̱navis, especially his Conference of the Birds (Manṭeq al-ṭayr) and Book of Affliction (Moṣibat-nâma), fro [...]
    2017-03 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    8.
    This dissertation traces the origin and evolution of the “global Armenian” in the Ottoman Empire focusing upon the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Particula [...]
    2017-03 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    9.
    This dissertation treats the controversial Syrian poet Abū l-ʿAlāʾ al-Maʿarrī (d. AD 1058) as a case study of medieval Arabic authorship. On one hand, readers have [...]
    2018-06 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    10.
    This study is an examination of the Syrian government’s strategic political engagement with the United Nations from 1945 to 1955. Specifically, this work provides an in [...]
    2018-08 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    11.
    This dissertation examines Arabic and Syriac writing on conversion among Muslims and Christians in early Islamic Greater Syria (Bilād al-Shām) and northern Iraq (al-Jaz [...]
    2018-08 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    12.
    This dissertation explores the rise of the Young Ottoman movement in the 1860s as a product of the new geopolitical order that emerged in the wake of the Crimean War (185 [...]
    2017-12 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    13.
    This dissertation considers the career and verse of the Iranian Kurdish poet and revolutionary Abū al-Qāsim of Kermanshah, pen-name “Lāhūtī” (1887-1957), as a ca [...]
    2018-12 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    14.
    This dissertation investigates two interrelated processes. The first is the development of official anti-Armenian policy and practice during the last quarter of the ninet [...]
    2018-12 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    15.
    This dissertation aims to shed light on the Arabian context of the Qur’ān by using sources that securely predate the Qur’ān from in and immediately around the Arabi [...]
    2017-06 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    16.
    Using recently excavated material from the large Chalcolithic site of Tell Zeidan, Syria, this dissertation considers a new approach to one of the most debated questions [...]
    2017 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    17.
    William Douglas Pickut,Literary Genres in Poetic Texts from the Dead Sea Scrolls,Abstract,December 8, 2016,Among the texts of the Dead Sea Scrolls, there are four literar [...]
    2016 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    18.
    Early in the 18th Dynasty, the Egyptian kings conquered their southern neighbors, the C-Group, Pan Grave, and Kerman populations of Nubia. After the conquest, there were [...]
    2017 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    19.
    In his 1955 survey of Jewish-Arab relations, 'Jews and Arabs: Their Contacts through the Ages,' S.D. Goitein, a leading scholar of Jewish history in the Medieval Islamic [...]
    01 January 2016 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    20.
    The Old Women are well-attested as religious functionaries in the Hittite texts. There is extensive evidence documenting their ritual and divinatory practice: they pacifi [...]
    01 January 2016 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    21.
    As markers of identity, social status, and administrative rank, seals and their designs functioned as one of the most important non-verbal identifiers for their owners in [...]
    01 January 2016 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    22.
    This dissertation explores the intellectual, cultural, and political history of knowledge in the late-medieval and early modern Ottoman context by examining the fifteenth [...]
    01 January 2016 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    23.
    This dissertation examines the political and ideological roles of King’s Sons during the 18th Dynasty. After a brief discussion of the nature of “sonship” in pharao [...]
    2017 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    24.
    Administration of the Hittite Empire is a contentious topic among Hittitologists, with some arguing that most administrative activity took place on perishable records now [...]
    2016 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    25.
    Abū Bakr (d. 13/634) is regarded as one of the most preeminent companions of the Prophet Muhammad by the majority of (Sunni) Muslims. In the Islamic tradition, he is not [...]
    2016 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation

    1.
    The Early Iron Age Southern Levant was a place in transition. The various Late Bronze Age city-states were collapsing and the New Kingdom Egyptian empire, part of a Medit [...]
    2016 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    2.
    This dissertation reconstructs the activities of an administrative agency in the Middle Assyrian government that was tasked with producing a daily offering in Assyrian ca [...]
    2016 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    3.
    Ash'ār al-Hudhaliyyīn, the anthology of the Hudhayl tribe’s poetry, which dates to around 550-700 CE, is the only complete collection of tribal Arabic poetry from the [...]
    2016 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    4.
    Birds were symbolically and pragmatically incorporated into the lives of ancient Egyptians in multiple ways. They appeared as necessary offerings to appease both the gods [...]
    2016 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    5.
    This dissertation reconsiders the theory of The Royal Ka, first proposed by Lanny Bell in 1985. This theory claimed that all aspects of ancient Egyptian royal divinity co [...]
    2018 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    6.
    Calling Out to Isis: the Enduring Nubian Presence at Philae Solange Ashby Abstract The expansion of the cult of Isis throughout the Mediterranean world demonstrates the [...]
    2016 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    7.
    This dissertation seeks to identify fluctuations and volatility in the prices of commodities in early Ptolemaic Egypt (332-186 BCE) and to explain the possible causes of [...]
    2018 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    8.
    Representing a new approach to the field of Amorite studies, this dissertation, by analyzing the Middle Bronze Age history of the polity of Ugarit, specifically considers [...]
    2018 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    9.
    Amidst the various disputes and controversies in the history of Qumran scholarship, scholars have generally neglected the stylistic study of the poetic texts of the Dead [...]
    2015 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation
    10.
    Reading a Radical Thinker: A Study on Sayyid Qutb,By Laith Saud ,This thesis examines Sayyid Qutb’s writings in various contexts in order to explicate more complex mean [...]
    2017 | Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Dissertation

     

    And see also: Dissertations in Ancient Near Eastern Studies Approved by the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, The University of Chicago

    Open Access Journal: Gerda Henkel Stiftung: Jahresbericht

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     [First posted in AWOL 23 May 2013, updated 15 May 2020]

    Gerda Henkel Stiftung: Jahresbericht
    The Gerda Henkel Foundation was established in 1976 by Lisa Maskell (1914 - 1998) in memory of her mother Gerda Henkel. Headquartered in Düsseldorf, the Gerda Henkel Foundation is a charitable organisation under private law that is independent of today's Henkel Group. The Foundation supports national and international academic projects in the following subjects: Archaeology, History, Historical Islamic Studies, Art History, History of Law, and Pre- and Protohistory. The Foundation is active both inside and outside Germany.


    Jahresbericht 2019

    Der Jahresbericht 2019 informiert über die laufenden Programme der Stiftung und stellt ausgewählte im Jahr 2019 neu in die Förderung aufgenommene und abgeschlossene Forschungsarbeiten vor. Die digitale Publikation des Jahresberichts bietet darüber hinaus Bildergalerien, Videos zu Veranstaltungen und Forschungsprojekten und weiterführende Links.
    Click through for back issues

    Archaeology of Digital Environments: Tools, Methods, and Approaches

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    Archaeology of Digital Environments: Tools, Methods, and Approaches
    Reinhard, Andrew Douglas (2019) Archaeology of Digital Environments: Tools, Methods, and Approaches. PhD thesis, University of York.
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    Reinhard_Thesis.pdf - Examined Thesis (PDF)
    Available under License Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales.

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    Abstract

    Digital archaeologists use digital tools for conducting archaeological work, but their potential also lies in applying archaeological thinking and methods to understanding digital built environments (i.e., software) as contemporary examples of human settlement, use, and abandonment. This thesis argues for digital spaces as archaeological artifacts, sites, and landscapes that can be investigated in both traditional and non-traditional ways. At the core of my research is the fundamental argument that human-occupied digital spaces can be studied archaeologically with existing and modified theory, tools, and methods to reveal that human occupation and use of synthetic worlds is similar to how people behave in the natural world. Working digitally adds new avenues of investigation into human behavior in relation to the things people make, modify, and inhabit. In order to investigate this argument, the thesis focuses on three video game case studies, each using different kinds of archaeology specifically chosen to help understand the software environments being researched: 1) epigraphy, stylometry, and text analysis for the code-artifact of Colossal Cave Adventure; 2) photogrammetry, 3D printing, GIS mapping, phenomenology, and landscape archaeology within the designed, digital heritage virtual reality game-site of Skyrim VR; 3) actual survey and excavation of 30 heritage sites for a community of displaced human players in the synthetic landscape of No Man’s Sky. My conclusions include a blended approach to conducting future archaeological fieldwork in digital built environments, one that modifies traditional approaches to archaeological sites and material in a post/transhuman landscape. As humanity continues trending towards constant digital engagement, archaeologists need to be prepared to study how digital places are settled, used, and abandoned. This thesis takes a step in that direction using the vernacular of games as a starting point.

    Open Access Journal: Figura – Studies on the Classical Tradition

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    [First posted in AWOL 15 June 2019, updated (new URLs) 16 May 2020]

    Figura – Studies on the Classical Tradition
    ISSN: 2317-4625

    Figura – Studies on the Classical Tradition is an international journal to be published online with unrestricted access, in order to disseminate current research and writing on the Classical Tradition’s repertoire. The journal  encompasses studies of Antiquity’s visual and textual culture, as well as appropriations and transfigurations of this legacy in the ancient and post-ancient world. Post-antiquity may be taken to include the contemporary period, therefore the cut-off used as a frame of reference for content proposed by Figura is conceptual rather than temporal, which calls for a distinction in this respect.

    Classical Tradition
    It is useful to look at the multidimensionality of the notion of “classical” by taking an approach previously seen as negative. Classical here does not refer to a style encoded in the various historical classicisms whose shared features, so to speak, were preference for a high repertoire, a sense of centrality, unity, structural transparency, an ideal of simplicity, a liking for disciplined play between rule and variety. Secondly, classical here bears no relation to a psychology of perception that would see in it a constant of the spirit. Thirdly,  classical here would not be associated with any judgmental residue, in the ambit of a Classical / Anticlassical antithesis, in which the second term would be reserved for urges or drives of a creative, innovative, experimental, or subjective nature.

    Once freed from these three senses of “classical” involved in overly specific perspectives, the notion of Classical Tradition may be defined more objectively. It refers to the historical process through which the cultures arisen from the Mediterranean Antiquity structured their mental coordinates, topics and argumentative procedures to constitute a repertoire of forms (visual, literary, rhetorical, mythological, philosophical, religious, scientific, musical, etc.) in an unceasing movement of crystallization, transmission and transformation of the meanings of the ancient models.

    Front cover: Bernardo Rossellino. Tomb of Leonardo Bruni. Marble, 1445-1447. Santa Croce, Florence (Archivio
    dell’Opera di Santa Croce, photograph by Paolo Tosi and Giorgio Misirlis).
    Published: 2019-10-08