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Open Access Journal: e-Jahresberichte des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts

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[First posted 10/19/09. Updated 20 August 2018]


e-Jahresberichte des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts
http://www.dainst.org/image/company_logo?img_id=11201&t=1420491186858
Von Beginn an wurden kurze Jahresberichte des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts in der Zeitschrift Archäologischer Anzeiger gedruckt veröffentlicht. 2006 erschien in neuem, farbigen Design erstmals ein umfangreicher Jahresbericht als eigenes Beiheft zum Anzeiger.  

Im Jahr 2014 strukturierte das Institut sein Berichtswesen neu. An die Stelle des gedruckten Berichtes treten nun mit den e-Forschungsberichten und dem e-Jahresbericht zwei unterschiedliche digitalePublikationsformate.
From DAI's very beginning, we have published concise annual reports in the journal Archäologischer Anzeiger. Our first comprehensive annual report in a new, colorful layout appeared as a supplement to the Anzeiger in 2006.
In 2014, the DAI restructured its report processes. Instead of a printed annual report, we now publish two separate, regular formats: our Research E-Papers and our Annual E-Reports.

Annual E-Report 2017

Annual E-Report 2016





Annual E-Report 2015



Annual E-Report 2014



Annual E-Report 2012/2013

Click here to view and download the first issue of our Annual E-Reports (report period 2012/2013, eDAI-J 2012/2013).
eDAI-J 2012/2013 (PDF 94 MB) or (PDF 16 MB).


Earlier issues




Annual reports for the years 2006 through 2011, originally published as supplement to Archäologischer Anzeiger, are also available for download:






LIMEN: A Latin Teaching Portal

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 [Firsts posted in AWOL 9 January 2016, updated 20 August 2018]

LIMEN: A Latin Teaching Portal
LIMEN - a Latin teaching portal

Welcome to LIMEN!

Are you looking to teach Latin—not just about Latin—in a way that takes seriously what we know about language and the brain?
Getting started with this heroic, exhilarating work can be overwhelming. LIMEN orients you to the many sources of support available to help you get (and keep) going!
Click any title to view details of these four essentials.
LIMEN theory
LIMEN practices
LIMEN materials
LIMEN resources

The Digital Latin Library

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[First posted in AWOL 31 July 2015, updated 20 August 2018]

The Digital Latin Library
http://digitallatin.org/sites/default/files/field/header_image/DLL_logo_web_large_mark.png
Our two-fold mission
  1. Publishing and curating critical editions of Latin texts, of all types, from all eras, and to facilitate an ongoing scholarly conversation about these texts through open collaboration and annotation.
  2. Facilitating the finding and, where openly available and accessible online, the reading of all texts written in Latin.
The Digital Latin Library (DLL) is a joint project of the Society for Classical Studies, the Medieval Academy of America, and the Renaissance Society of America. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation's Scholarly Communications Program funds the project, and the University of Oklahoma hosts it.

We use the word "library" to describe our project because that word's many meanings apply to what we're building: a library of texts and resources, a place where individuals and groups can study and collaborate on projects, a series of volumes published according to a uniform standard, and resources for digital applications.


Welcome to the Digital Latin Library's Catalog!

This site supports the DLL's mission of "facilitating the finding and, where openly available and accessible online, the reading of all texts written in Latin."
The DLL Catalog provides an organized, curated system for finding Latin texts available online. 
Currently, it contains authority records for nearly 3,000 authors and 5,000 works, with many more to come. It also contains individual item records for hundreds of texts available in a variety of formats through many different resources such as the Perseus Digital Library, the Packard Humanities Institute, DigilibLT, the HathiTrust Digital Library, and others.
The "Catalog Updates" section below records items added to the catalog. Check the list of current projects for more information.
Otherwise, use the search bar or click "Browse the Catalog" above to get started, or read more about this site and how to get the most out of it.

Catalog Updates

Biblioteca Italiana (BibIT)

Metadata for all Latin content on http://www.bibliotecaitaliana.it, which includes many works in Medieval and Neo-Latin, is available in a convenient reader view at http://www.internetculturale.it. For that reason, we built and ran a scraper on that site and pulled metadata only from Latin texts in BibIT. In all, 145 items were added on 2018-07-07. Going forward, the plan is to reconnect to the site on a quarterly basis and process any new records that have been added since the last connection.
Post date: Fri, 07/06/2018 - 19:00

Perseus Digital Library

Instead of scraping the collection available at http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper, we built an application to process the texts in the git repository at https://github.com/PerseusDL/canonical-latinLit. We did this because, as its name suggests, the repository is canonical for the old Perseus site and the new Scaife Viewer (https://scaife.perseus.org). Since the Scaife Viewer does not yet have all of the texts from the old site, we included links to the Scaife Viewer where they are available. Otherwise, the links point to the old Perseus site. It is clear that this collection will need active monitoring, since it is undergoing many changes. The total number of items from the Perseus repository added to the DLL Catalog on 2018-06-25 was 452.
Post date: Sun, 06/24/2018 - 19:00

Packard Humanities Institute Classical Latin Texts

Metadata for all content on http://latin.packhum.org as of 2017-12-07 has been scraped, processed, and added to the site. The total number of items uploaded was 836. Since the PHI is not currently under active development, it is unlikely that it will require active monitoring for new additions.
Post date: Wed, 12/06/2017 - 18:00

Digital Library of Late-antique Latin Texts

Metadata for all content that was on http://www.digiliblt.unipmn.it as of 2017-10-17 has been scraped, processed, and added to the DLL Catalog. The total number of items uploaded at that time was 425. Going forward, the plan is to reconnect to the site on a quarterly basis and process any new records that have been added since the last connection.
Post date: Mon, 10/16/2017 - 19:00

Open Access Journal: Bio Bank Update: The Ancient Egyptian Animal Bio Bank, University of Manchester

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Bio Bank Update: The Ancient Egyptian Animal Bio Bank, University of Manchester
http://www.manchester.ac.uk/medialibrary/images/corporate/logomanchester.gif
The study of mummified animals from ancient Egypt has often been perceived as being of lesser importance than the study of the human dead; however, this project aims to promote the study of faunal material of this kind by uncovering information relating to these creatures and the ancient culture that preserved them. 

Established in June 2010, the Ancient Egyptian Animal Bio Bank Project is a centralised database and image bank for mummified animal material from museums in the UK and overseas. The concept, developed to contribute to the existing International Ancient Egyptian Mummy Tissue Bank, will combine known records with new research to broaden current knowledge and increase understanding.

Research carried out at the KNH Centre has focused on the application of non-invasive techniques to obtain the maximum amount of information without compromising the integrity of the mummies. However, in some cases we have been able to obtain small samples from damaged areas, which have been subjected to preliminary non-invasive microscopic imaging. These samples are stored in the Tissue Bank facility under environmentally controlled conditions.

Bio Bank Newsletter - issue 4

Bio Bank Newsletter - issue 3

Bio Bank Newsletter - issue 2

Bio Bank Newsletter - issue 1

Open Access Journal: LionBytes [Newsletter of the Nemea Center for Classical Archaeology]

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[First posted in AWOL 27 April 2013, updated 20 August, 2018]

LionBytes [Newsletter of the Nemea Center for Classical Archaeology]
http://nemeacenter.berkeley.edu/sites/default/files/nemea/images/website/zen_classic_logo.png
The Nemea Center for Classical Archaeology, a research unit within the Department of Classics, founded in 2004, promotes teaching, research, and public service centered on the University of California excavations at Nemea, Greece and its surrounding region.
The Center fosters an environment of teaching and scholarly cooperation that is a model in the field of classical archaeology.  The Center is composed of the Nemea Excavation Archives, housed in 7125 Dwinelle Hall, University of California, Berkeley, and the Nemea Archaeological Center in Nemea, Greece, which is composed of the Bowker House complex (residences, common room/kitchen, storage areas and garden), the Thomas J. Long Study Room in the Nemea Archaeological Museum (office/drafting space, research library and archive of original excavation materials) and the Nemean land to which Berkeley holds scientific rights.
All the work and activities of the Nemea Center, including staff support, is financed solely through donations. If you are interested in making a donation please visit our “Donate” website for information.

The latest installment of LionBytes is out!
We've been very busy the last few years with new excavations at the Late Bronze Age cemetery of Aidonia, Greece as well as continued study seasons at both Mycenae and Nemea. This latest iteration of LionBytes outlines some of the recent work conducted by our team. We hope you'll browse the newsletter at your convenience and get in touch with us about exciting events and opportunities in the future! You can access the December 2017 edition of LionBytes by clicking here.

LionBytes Back Issues

UCLA Encyclopedia of Egyptology (UEE)

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[originally posted on AWOL 6/9/09, most recently updated 20 August 2018]

UCLA Encyclopedia of Egyptology (UEE)
University of California, Los Angeles
ISBN: 978-0-615-21403-0
Egyptology has as its object of study the history, practices, and conceptual categories of a culture that was remarkably prolific in terms of written texts, art, architecture, and other forms of material culture. The knowledge of Egyptologists, archaeologists, linguists, geologists, and all other professionals who are involved in research related to Ancient Egypt reflect the interdisciplinary approach that is needed to make sense of such a wealth of information. The peer-reviewed articles of the UEE are written by the world's leading scholars.
In the coming decade we will continue to build the content of the UEE, while a separate web site, the UEE Full Version, will be available starting in 2010. The full version will have enhanced searches, such as a map-search functionality, alphabetical and subject browsing, in-text links, explanations of terminology for non-professionals, an image archive, and Virtual Reality reconstructions. In addition, a Data-Access Level is under development, which links articles with the results of original research. Information on the development of the UEE Full Version can be found at http://www.uee.ucla.edu.
Articles published since the beginning of 2016
Cover page of Late Antiquity

Late Antiquity

(2018)
Late antique Egypt ran from the reign of the Roman emperor Diocletian (284-305 CE) to the Arab conquest of Egypt (641 CE). During this period, Egypt was part of the eastern Roman Empire and was ruled from Constantinople from the founding of that city in the 320s CE. Culturally, Egypt’s elite were part of the wider Roman world, sharing in its classical education. However, several developments marked Egypt’s distinctiveness in this period. These developments included the flourishing of literature in Coptic, the final written form of the native language, and the creation and rapid growth of several forms of...
Cover page of Microhistory

Microhistory

(2018)
Microhistory is a rather ambiguous term, usually referring to the lives, activities, and cultural values of common people, rarely evoked in official sources. In the case of ancient Egypt, both the urban and village spheres provide some clues about the existence, social relations, spiritual expectations, and life conditions of farmers, craftspersons, and “marginal” populations (such as herders), and also about “invisible” elites that played so important a role in the stability of the kingdom. In some instances, exceptional archives (the Ramesside tomb-robbery papyri, Papyrus Turin 1887, recording the...
Cover page of Radjedef to the Eighth Dynasty

Radjedef to the Eighth Dynasty

(2017)
Our sources for the chronology of the Old Kingdom comprise a mere handful of contemporary written documents, supplemented by radiocarbon dates, some of which have recently been recalibrated by Oxford University. The bulk of historical evidence, deriving primarily from residential cemeteries of the ruling kings and the elite, as well as from provincial sites, shows that during large portions of the Old Kingdom Egypt represented a relatively centralized state with a well-structured administrative system. Until the end of the Fourth Dynasty Egypt’s royal family exercised a role of complete authority...
Cover page of Metaphor

Metaphor

(2017)
When tracing the epistemological but also thematic development of metaphor studies in Egyptology, what can be seen is a change from a typological perspective, which sought to categorize both motifs and metaphor types, to a more cognitive perspective, which was more interested in the processes behind the linguistic phenomena. In the last few years there has also been increased interest in the development of metaphors in pan-textual as well as multimodal perspective and in the usage and extent of metaphors in all range of phenomena, such as textual, graphemic, and even pictorial media.
Cover page of Reserve Head

Reserve Head

(2017)
The enigmatic reserve heads of the Old Kingdom (2670-2168 BCE) in Egypt have been the topic of much discussion and debate since their discovery, primarily on the Giza Plateau, at the turn of the twentieth century. Their purpose and meaning to the ancient Egyptians confounded the first excavators who discovered them (de Morgan, Borchardt, Reisner, and Junker), and have puzzled the later Egyptian art historians, archaeologists, and Egyptologists who have studied them over the past century. This is mainly because the Egyptians did not leave a record for their use or function and because the heads were...
Cover page of History of Egypt in Palestine

History of Egypt in Palestine

(2016)

Egyptian interactions and contact with Palestine began as early as the fourth millennium BCE, and continued, in varying forms and at times far more intensively than others, until the conquest of the ancient world by Alexander the Great. Numerous data—textual, material, archaeological—found in both Egyptian and southern Levantine contexts illustrate the diverse spectrum of interaction and contact between the two regions, which ranged from colonialism, to imperial expansion, to diplomatic relations, to commerce. By virtue of geographic proximity, economic interests, and occasionally political...
Cover page of Ration System

Ration System

(2016)
The distribution of rations can be found in documents from different period of the Egyptian history but the general features of the ration system is not easy to trace. Most of the sources are the more or less fragmentary lists of wages/payments that reflect various conditions, such as status of the recipients, period to which the payment corresponds etc, that are not always known to us. Other documents provide us with categories of allowances ascribed to the workmen and officials who participated on the same project. A few traces of a systematic approach can be recognized in the evidence, for instance...
Cover page of Meroitic

Meroitic

(2016)
The Meroitic language is known from more than two thousands inscriptions found in the northern part of Sudan and in Egyptian Nubia. Although it was written only during the Kingdom of Meroe (300 BC – AD 350), the language is already attested in Egyptian transcriptions of personal names from the second millennium BC on. Meroitic was written in two scripts, cursive and hieroglyphic, both derived from Egyptian scripts. The system is alphasyllabic and uses twenty-three signs plus a word-divider made of two or three dots. The scripts were deciphered in 1907-1911 by F. Ll. Griffith, but knowledge of the...
Cover page of Second Intermediate Period

Second Intermediate Period

(2016)
In the Second Intermediate Period (late 13th to 17th Dynasty), the territories that had been ruled by the centralized Egyptian state—including Lower Nubia—were divided between the kingdom of Kerma, the Theban kingdom, the kingdom of Avaris, and possibly other little known political entities. A gap in the written documentation calls for a wide use of sigillographic and archaeological evidence in the reconstruction of the history of this period. Material culture, art, and administration developed independently in different parts of Egypt due to a lack of a centralized state. In the Theban kingdom, the...
Cover page of Traditional Egyptian I (Dynamics)

Traditional Egyptian I (Dynamics)

(2016)
The problem of the phenomenon referred to as égyptien de tradition(Traditional Egyptian) derives from a basic and long-made observation: a great many texts from ancient Egypt implement an obviously anachronistic and partly artificial language, reflecting elements of earlier stages of Egyptian in varying proportions and degrees while also reflecting elements of the contemporary language. Texts continued to be written in égyptien de tradition, either on easy-to-handle supports such as papyri, tablets, and ostraca, or on durable objects and monuments, until the end of Pharaonic civilization.
Cover page of Ba

Ba

(2016)
The ba was often written with the sign of a saddle-billed stork or a human-headed falcon and translated into modern languages as the “soul.” It counts among key Egyptian religious terms and concepts, since it described one of the individual components or manifestations in the ancient Egyptian view of both human and divine beings. The notion of the ba itself encompassed many different aspects, spanning from the manifestation of divine powers to the impression that one makes on the world. The complexity of this term also reveals important aspects of the nature of and changes within ancient Egyptian religion.
Cover page of Tell el-Amarna

Tell el-Amarna

(2016)
Tell el-Amarna is situated in middle Egypt and is the location of the New Kingdom city of Akhetaten, founded by Akhenaten in c. 1347 BCE as the cult home for the Aten. Occupied only briefly, it is our most complete example of an ancient Egyptian city, at which a contemporaneous urban landscape of cult and ceremonial buildings, palaces, houses, cemeteries, and public spaces has been exposed. It is an invaluable source for the study of both Akhenaten’s reign and of ancient Egyptian urbanism. The site has an extensive excavation history, and work continues there today.
Cover page of Traditional Egyptian II (Ptolemaic, Roman)

Traditional Egyptian II (Ptolemaic, Roman)

(2016)
From 404 BCE - 394 CE hieroglyphic texts were in general composed in the high-status language variety termed Traditional Egyptian. This was used exclusively in religious and sacerdotal contexts and is as such opposed to Demotic, which served both as a spoken and as a written language. Traditional Egyptian is a reflex of how the late scribes perceived the classical language. The result is a morphologically impoverished Egyptian (in comparison with the classical language), in combination with a phonology that corresponds largely to Demotic. Traditional Egyptian served as a vehicle for many new...
 Articles published since the beginning of 2015:
Cover page of Late Antiquity

Late Antiquity

(2018)
Late antique Egypt ran from the reign of the Roman emperor Diocletian (284-305 CE) to the Arab conquest of Egypt (641 CE). During this period, Egypt was part of the eastern Roman Empire and was ruled from Constantinople from the founding of that city in the 320s CE. Culturally, Egypt’s elite were part of the wider Roman world, sharing in its classical education. However, several developments marked Egypt’s distinctiveness in this period. These developments included the flourishing of literature in Coptic, the final written form of the native language, and the creation and rapid growth of several forms of...
Cover page of Microhistory

Microhistory

(2018)
Microhistory is a rather ambiguous term, usually referring to the lives, activities, and cultural values of common people, rarely evoked in official sources. In the case of ancient Egypt, both the urban and village spheres provide some clues about the existence, social relations, spiritual expectations, and life conditions of farmers, craftspersons, and “marginal” populations (such as herders), and also about “invisible” elites that played so important a role in the stability of the kingdom. In some instances, exceptional archives (the Ramesside tomb-robbery papyri, Papyrus Turin 1887, recording the...
Cover page of Radjedef to the Eighth Dynasty

Radjedef to the Eighth Dynasty

(2017)
Our sources for the chronology of the Old Kingdom comprise a mere handful of contemporary written documents, supplemented by radiocarbon dates, some of which have recently been recalibrated by Oxford University. The bulk of historical evidence, deriving primarily from residential cemeteries of the ruling kings and the elite, as well as from provincial sites, shows that during large portions of the Old Kingdom Egypt represented a relatively centralized state with a well-structured administrative system. Until the end of the Fourth Dynasty Egypt’s royal family exercised a role of complete authority...
Cover page of Metaphor

Metaphor

(2017)
When tracing the epistemological but also thematic development of metaphor studies in Egyptology, what can be seen is a change from a typological perspective, which sought to categorize both motifs and metaphor types, to a more cognitive perspective, which was more interested in the processes behind the linguistic phenomena. In the last few years there has also been increased interest in the development of metaphors in pan-textual as well as multimodal perspective and in the usage and extent of metaphors in all range of phenomena, such as textual, graphemic, and even pictorial media.
Cover page of Reserve Head

Reserve Head

(2017)
The enigmatic reserve heads of the Old Kingdom (2670-2168 BCE) in Egypt have been the topic of much discussion and debate since their discovery, primarily on the Giza Plateau, at the turn of the twentieth century. Their purpose and meaning to the ancient Egyptians confounded the first excavators who discovered them (de Morgan, Borchardt, Reisner, and Junker), and have puzzled the later Egyptian art historians, archaeologists, and Egyptologists who have studied them over the past century. This is mainly because the Egyptians did not leave a record for their use or function and because the heads were...
Cover page of History of Egypt in Palestine

History of Egypt in Palestine

(2016)

Egyptian interactions and contact with Palestine began as early as the fourth millennium BCE, and continued, in varying forms and at times far more intensively than others, until the conquest of the ancient world by Alexander the Great. Numerous data—textual, material, archaeological—found in both Egyptian and southern Levantine contexts illustrate the diverse spectrum of interaction and contact between the two regions, which ranged from colonialism, to imperial expansion, to diplomatic relations, to commerce. By virtue of geographic proximity, economic interests, and occasionally political...
Cover page of Ration System

Ration System

(2016)
The distribution of rations can be found in documents from different period of the Egyptian history but the general features of the ration system is not easy to trace. Most of the sources are the more or less fragmentary lists of wages/payments that reflect various conditions, such as status of the recipients, period to which the payment corresponds etc, that are not always known to us. Other documents provide us with categories of allowances ascribed to the workmen and officials who participated on the same project. A few traces of a systematic approach can be recognized in the evidence, for instance...
Cover page of Meroitic

Meroitic

(2016)
The Meroitic language is known from more than two thousands inscriptions found in the northern part of Sudan and in Egyptian Nubia. Although it was written only during the Kingdom of Meroe (300 BC – AD 350), the language is already attested in Egyptian transcriptions of personal names from the second millennium BC on. Meroitic was written in two scripts, cursive and hieroglyphic, both derived from Egyptian scripts. The system is alphasyllabic and uses twenty-three signs plus a word-divider made of two or three dots. The scripts were deciphered in 1907-1911 by F. Ll. Griffith, but knowledge of the...
Cover page of Second Intermediate Period

Second Intermediate Period

(2016)
In the Second Intermediate Period (late 13th to 17th Dynasty), the territories that had been ruled by the centralized Egyptian state—including Lower Nubia—were divided between the kingdom of Kerma, the Theban kingdom, the kingdom of Avaris, and possibly other little known political entities. A gap in the written documentation calls for a wide use of sigillographic and archaeological evidence in the reconstruction of the history of this period. Material culture, art, and administration developed independently in different parts of Egypt due to a lack of a centralized state. In the Theban kingdom, the...
Cover page of Traditional Egyptian I (Dynamics)

Traditional Egyptian I (Dynamics)

(2016)
The problem of the phenomenon referred to as égyptien de tradition(Traditional Egyptian) derives from a basic and long-made observation: a great many texts from ancient Egypt implement an obviously anachronistic and partly artificial language, reflecting elements of earlier stages of Egyptian in varying proportions and degrees while also reflecting elements of the contemporary language. Texts continued to be written in égyptien de tradition, either on easy-to-handle supports such as papyri, tablets, and ostraca, or on durable objects and monuments, until the end of Pharaonic civilization.
Cover page of Ba

Ba

(2016)
The ba was often written with the sign of a saddle-billed stork or a human-headed falcon and translated into modern languages as the “soul.” It counts among key Egyptian religious terms and concepts, since it described one of the individual components or manifestations in the ancient Egyptian view of both human and divine beings. The notion of the ba itself encompassed many different aspects, spanning from the manifestation of divine powers to the impression that one makes on the world. The complexity of this term also reveals important aspects of the nature of and changes within ancient Egyptian religion.
Cover page of Tell el-Amarna

Tell el-Amarna

(2016)
Tell el-Amarna is situated in middle Egypt and is the location of the New Kingdom city of Akhetaten, founded by Akhenaten in c. 1347 BCE as the cult home for the Aten. Occupied only briefly, it is our most complete example of an ancient Egyptian city, at which a contemporaneous urban landscape of cult and ceremonial buildings, palaces, houses, cemeteries, and public spaces has been exposed. It is an invaluable source for the study of both Akhenaten’s reign and of ancient Egyptian urbanism. The site has an extensive excavation history, and work continues there today.
Cover page of Traditional Egyptian II (Ptolemaic, Roman)

Traditional Egyptian II (Ptolemaic, Roman)

(2016)
From 404 BCE - 394 CE hieroglyphic texts were in general composed in the high-status language variety termed Traditional Egyptian. This was used exclusively in religious and sacerdotal contexts and is as such opposed to Demotic, which served both as a spoken and as a written language. Traditional Egyptian is a reflex of how the late scribes perceived the classical language. The result is a morphologically impoverished Egyptian (in comparison with the classical language), in combination with a phonology that corresponds largely to Demotic. Traditional Egyptian served as a vehicle for many new...
Cover page of Violence

Violence

(2015)
Throughout time, Egyptian sources display divergent attitudes towards violence expressing the belief that some situations of violence were positive and to be encouraged, while others were to be avoided. Sanctioned violence could be employed for a variety of reasons—the severity of which ranged from inflicting blows to gruesome death. Violence was part of the preternatural realm, notably as Egyptians attempted to thwart potential violence in the afterlife. While the average Egyptian was supposed to eschew violence, kings and their representatives were expected to engage in violent acts in many...
  • 1 supplemental PDF
Cover page of Life Expectancy

Life Expectancy

(2015)
The analysis of life expectancy and longevity is one approach to analysing diversity in the population of ancient Egypt. It is, however, important to understand the difficulties in such calculations and in the data from which such calculations are derived. Adult age is difficult to determine either from documentary or biological sources, so average age-at-death is particularly hard to determine. This discussion explores the issues surrounding demography, the potential sources for such data, and suggests ways that life expectancy in Egypt might be assessed and integrated with broader archaeological and Egyptological...
Cover page of Persian Period

Persian Period

(2015)
In the last two centuries before the arrival of Alexander the Great, Persia invaded Egypt twice and administered it as a satrapy of the Achaemenid Empire. Although the Ptolemies later demonized the Persians, and most traces of their rule were systematically removed, the history of this fascinating period can be reconstructed thanks to written sources from different languages (hieroglyphic, Demotic, Aramaic, Old Persian, Greek) and the multicultural archaeological record. These periods of foreign domination helped solidify Egypt's national identity during the intervening Late Period (Dynasties 28-30) and set the...
Cover page of Cognitive Linguistics

Cognitive Linguistics

(2015)
Cognitive linguistics is an influential branch of linguistics, which has played an increasing role in different areas of Egyptology over the last couple of decades. Concepts from cognitive linguistics have been especially influential in the study of determinatives/classifiers in the hieroglyphic script, but they have also proven useful to elucidate a number of other questions, both narrowly linguistic and more broadly cultural historical.
Cover page of Pyramid Age: Huni to Radjedef

Pyramid Age: Huni to Radjedef

(2015)
The early to mid-4th Dynasty (c. 2600-2500 BCE) stands out as a peak of monumentality in the early historical periods of Pharaonic Egypt. Within 100 years, Sneferu, Khufu, and Radjedef built pyramids on an unprecedented scale at Maidum, Dahshur, Giza, and Abu Rawash. Pyramid construction absorbed enormous resources and reflects a new quality of large-scale organization and centralization. Pyramids are the nucleus of Old Kingdom court cemeteries. The early 4th Dynasty examples were a template for...
Cover page of Amarna Period

Amarna Period

(2015)
The reign of Pharaoh Akhenaten/Amenhotep IV is controversial. Although substantial evidence for this period has been preserved, it is inconclusive on many important details. Nonetheless, the revolutionary nature of Akhenaten’s rule is salient to the modern student of ancient Egypt. The king’s devotion to and promotion of only one deity, the sun disk Aten, is a break from traditional Egyptian religion. Many theories developed about this era are often influenced by the history of its rediscovery and by recognition that Akhenaten’s immediate successors rejected his rule.
Cover page of Akkadian from Egypt

Akkadian from Egypt

(2015)
Akkadian, an ancient Semitic language from Mesopotamia written in the cuneiform script, wasemployed as a diplomatic lingua franca between the major powers of the Late Bronze Age.Akkadian from Egypt defines the language of the Akkadian texts that originated in Egypt. Thesewere probably written by Egyptian scribes. On various linguistic levels ranging from phonology tomorpho-syntax, Akkadian from Egypt differs from contemporary varieties of Akkadian. In severalcases, these differences can be analyzed as probably representing interferences with Egyptian, thenative language of the scribes. Rather than as...
Cover page of Transition 18th–19th dynasty

Transition 18th–19th dynasty

(2015)
The transition between the 18th and 19th Dynasties, a period beginning with the reign of Aye and concluding with the reign of Sety I, represents the conclusion to the tumultuous Amarna Period and the beginning of the stability and prosperity of the following Ramesside Period. The rule of individuals coming from non-royal families—Aye, Horemheb, and Ramesses I—gives way to a strong dynastic succession with Sety I. Limited monumental construction during the short reigns of Aye and Ramesses I can be contrasted with the extensive building at Karnak during the reign of Horemheb and the...
Cover page of Computational Linguistics in Egyptology

Computational Linguistics in Egyptology

(2015)
Computer-assisted approaches to text and language, referred to as computational linguistics, represent a developing field in Egyptology. One of the main concerns has been and continues to be the encoding of hieroglyphic signs for computers. The historical standard in this respect is the Manuel de Codage; a Unicode encoding has also been recently developed. Computer-assisted approaches also provide helpful tools notably for creating, annotating, and exploiting text databases. After pioneering work in the 1960s, a number of large text databases have been developed since the 1990s, for example, the Thesaurus...
Cover page of Old Egyptian

Old Egyptian

(2015)
Old Egyptian is the earliest stage of the ancient Egyptian language that is preserved in extensive texts. It represents a dialect as well as a historical stage of the language, showing grammatical similarities with and distinctions from later ones. One particular issue in studying Old Egyptian lies in the uneven nature of the Old Kingdom written record, which mostly consists of texts relating to the funerary domain.
Articles published before 2015
Grandet, Pierre: Early–mid 20th dynasty, 2014
Janák, Jíří: Saddle-Billed Stork (Ba-Bird), 2014
Midant-Reynes, Beatrix: Prehistoric Regional Cultures, 2014
Moyer, Ian: Egyptian History in the Classical Historiographers, 2014
Mueller-Wollermann, Renate: End of the Old Kingdom, 2014
Popko, Lutz: History-Writing in Ancient Egypt, 2014
Raue, Dietrich: Sanctuary of Heqaib, 2014
Wilkinson, Toby: Dynasties 2 and 3, 2014
Campagno, Marcelo P: Late Fourth Millennium BCE, 2013
Darnell, John C: Wadi el-Hol, 2013
Emerit, Sibylle: Music and Musicians, 2013
Fiore Marochetti, Elisa: Gebelein, 2013
Gallet, Laetitia: Karnak: the Temple of Amun-Ra-Who-Hears-Prayers, 2013
Grajetzki, Wolfram: Late Middle Kingdom, 2013
Harrell, James A.: Ornamental Stones, 2013
Janák, Jíří: Akh, 2013
Janák, Jíří: Northern Bald Ibis (Akh-Bird), 2013
Köpp-Junk, Heidi: Travel, 2013
Ladynin, Ivan: Late Dynastic Period, 2013
Lippert, Sandra: Inheritance, 2013
Moeller, Nadine: Edfu, 2013
Moreno Garcia, Juan Carlos: Land Donations, 2013
Pfeiffer, Stefan: Egypt and Greece Before Alexander, 2013
Popko, Lutz: Late Second Intermediate Period to Early New Kingdom, 2013
Toivari-Viitala, Jaana: Marriage and Divorce, 2013
Uljas, Sami: Linguistic consciousness, 2013
Vinson, Steve: Boats (Use of), 2013
Vinson, Steve: Transportation, 2013
Vittmann, Günter: Personal Names: Function and Significance, 2013
Vittmann, Günter: Personal Names: Structures and Patterns, 2013
De Meyer, Marleen; Minas-Nerpel, Martina: Shenhur, Temple of, 2012
DuQuesne, Terence: Jmjwt, 2012
Grajetzki, Wolfram: Qau el-Kebir, 2012
Harrell, James A.: Building Stones, 2012
Harrell, James: Gemstones, 2012
Harrell, James A.: Utilitarian Stones, 2012
Katary, Sally: Land Tenure (to the End of the Ptolemaic Period), 2012
Kockelmann, Holger: Philae, 2012
Kucharek, Andrea: Gebel el-Silsila, 2012
Lippert, Sandra: Law Courts, 2012
Lippert, Sandra: Law: Definitions and Codification, 2012
Loprieno, Antonio: Slavery and Servitude, 2012
Milde, Henk: Shabtis, 2012
Moreno Garcia, Juan Carlos: Deir el-Gabrawi, 2012
Moreno Garcia, Juan Carlos: Households, 2012
Pantalacci, Laure: Coptos, 2012
Riggs, Christina; Baines, John: Ethnicity, 2012
Roth, Silke: Harem, 2012
Stadler, Martin A: Thoth, 2012
Budde, Dagmar: Epithets, Divine, 2011
Emery, Virginia L.: Mud-Brick Architecture, 2011
Hallof, Jochen: Esna, 2011
Hallof, Jochen: Esna-North, 2011
Katary, Sally: Taxation, 2011
Kockelmann, Holger: Birth House (Mammisi), 2011
Kuhlmann, Klaus P.: Throne, 2011
Laboury, Dimitri: Amarna Art, 2011
Manassa, Colleen: El-Mo’alla to El-Deir, 2011
McClain, Brett: Cosmogony (Late to Ptolemaic and Roman Periods), 2011
Millet, Marie; Masson, Aurélia: Karnak: Settlements, 2011
Moreno Garcia, Juan Carlos: Village, 2011
Nicholson, Paul: Glass Working, Use and Discard, 2011
Schulz, Regine: Block Statue, 2011
Sweeney, Deborah: Sex and Gender, 2011
Toivari-Viitala, Jaana: Deir el-Medina (Development), 2011
Zivie-Coche, Christiane: Foreign Deities in Egypt, 2011
Bloxam, Elizabeth: Quarrying and Mining (Stone), 2010
Borg, Barbara E.: Painted Funerary Portraits, 2010
Brand, Peter: Reuse and Restoration, 2010
Brand, Peter: Usurpation of Monuments, 2010
Budde, Dagmar: Child Deities, 2010
Darnell, John: Opet Festival, 2010
Guilhou, Nadine: Myth of the Heavenly Cow, 2010
Hays, Harold: Funerary Rituals (Pharaonic Period), 2010
Hikade, Thomas: Hiw (Predynastic), 2010
Hikade, Thomas: Stone Tool Production, 2010
Ikram, Salima: Mummification, 2010
Kahl, Jochem: Archaism, 2010
Laboury, Dimitri: Portrait versus Ideal Image, 2010
Lazaridis, Nikolaos: Education and Apprenticeship, 2010
Leprohon, Ronald: Patterns of Royal Name-giving, 2010
Lucarelli, Rita: Demons (benevolent and malevolent), 2010
Meyer-Dietrich, Erika: Recitation, Speech Acts, and Declamation, 2010
Nicholson, Paul: Kilns and Firing Structures, 2010
Poo, Mu-Chou: Liquids in Temple Ritual, 2010
Riggs, Christina: Body, 2010
Riggs, Christina: Funerary rituals (Ptolemaic and Roman Periods), 2010
Spencer, Neal: Shrine, 2010
Spieser, Cathie: Cartouche, 2010
Sullivan, Elaine: Karnak: Development of the Temple of Amun-Ra, 2010
Teeter, Emily: Feathers, 2010
von Lieven, Alexandra: Deified Humans, 2010
Campagno, Marcelo P: Kinship and Family Relations, 2009
Coppens, Filip: Temple Festivals of the Ptolemaic and Roman Periods, 2009
Dodson, Aidan: Rituals Related to Animal Cults, 2009
Emery, Virginia L.: Mud-Brick, 2009
Gillam, Robyn: Drama, 2009
Haring, Ben: Economy, 2009
Harvey, Julia: Wooden Statuary, 2009
Huyge, Dirk: Rock Art, 2009
Leach, Bridget: Papyrus Manufacture, 2009
Manniche, Lise: Perfume, 2009
Meyer-Dietrich, Erika: Dance, 2009
Nicholson, Paul: Faience Technology, 2009
Nicholson, Paul T.: Pottery Production, 2009
Phillips, Jacke S.: Ostrich Eggshell, 2009
Pinch, Geraldine; Waraksa, Elizabeth A.: Votive Practices, 2009
Roth, Silke: Queen, 2009
Shortland, Andrew: Glass Production, 2009
Smith, Mark: Democratization of the Afterlife, 2009
Stevens, Anna: Domestic religious practices, 2009
Stevenson, Alice: Palettes, 2009
Stevenson, Alice: Predynastic Burials, 2009
Veldmeijer, André J.: Cordage Production, 2009
Vinson, Steve: Seafaring, 2009
Wengrow, David: Predynastic Art, 2009
Cooney, Kathlyn M: Scarab, 2008
Coulon, Laurent: Famine, 2008
Cruz-Uribe, Eugene: Graffiti (Figural), 2008
Enmarch, Roland: Theodicy, 2008
Exell, Karen: Ancestor Bust, 2008
Lazaridis, Nikolaos: Ethics, 2008
Luiselli, Michela: Personal Piety (modern theories related to), 2008
Moreno García, Juan Carlos: Estates (Old Kingdom), 2008
Muhlestein, Kerry: Execration Ritual, 2008
Naguib, Saphinaz-Amal: Survivals of Pharaonic Religious Practices in Contemporary Coptic Christianity., 2008
Servajean, Frédéric: Duality, 2008
Smith, Mark: Osiris and the Deceased, 2008
Stadler, Martin: Judgment after Death (Negative Confession), 2008
Stadler, Martin: Procession, 2008
Stevenson, Alice: Mace, 2008
Veldmeijer, André J.: Leatherworking, 2008
Waraksa, Elizabeth: Female Figurines (Pharaonic Period), 2008
Wilkinson, Richard H.: Anthropomorphic Deities, 2008
Zivie-Coche, Christiane: Late Period Temples, 2008

The Wonders of the ADS

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The Wonders of the ADS
 
The Wonders of the ADS, is a digital exhibition dedicated to highlighting the outstanding digital data held in the ADS archive.

The exhibition features many different data types held in the archive, from digital photography and drawings, to 3D models and videos. The exhibition also features the different facets of archaeological investigation, from different thematic time periods to different methodological approaches.

We invite you to explore the exhibition and take a journey to discover data you didn't know we held!

Open Access Journal: JANES - Journal of the Ancient Near Eastern Society

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[First posted in AWOL 23 October 2009. Updated 21 August 2018]

JANES - Journal of the Ancient Near Eastern Society
ISSN: 0010-2016
JANES, the Journal of the Ancient Near Eastern Society, was founded in 1968 at Columbia University, and has been housed at the Jewish Theological Seminary since 1982. Over these approximately forty years 30 volumes have been published under the editorship of former JTS professor Ed Greenstein and JTS professor David Marcus. The volumes include approximately three hundred and fifty articles written by over two hundred scholars and students from all over the world. The impressive array of scholars that have contributed articles to these volumes includes well-known names such as G. R. Driver, H. L. Ginsberg, Jonas Greenfield, William Hallo, Thorkild Jacobsen, Jacob Milgrom, A. L. Oppenheim, to mention but a few. Over the years there have been five special issues celebrating JTS and Columbia scholars Elias Bickerman, Meir Bravmann, Theodor Gaster, Moshe Held, and Yochanan Muffs. Articles have been written on all aspects of the Bible and Ancient Near East covering areas such as art history, archaeology, anthropology, language, linguistics, philology, and religion. There are articles on Assyriology, Ugaritic, Phoenician, Hittite, and all areas of Hebrew and Aramaic and on almost every book of the Bible. Manuscripts should be composed according to the SBL style sheet and sent to the Editors, c/o Ed Greenstein (greenstein.ed@gmail.com)

Open Access Journal: Ars Orientalis

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[First posted in AWOL 24 January 2016, updated 22 August 2018]

Ars Orientalis
ISSN: 0571-1371
Ars Orientalis logo
Each fall the Freer and Sackler Galleries publish, with the University of Michigan, a journal of the latest research in art of the Middle East and Asia. Titled Ars Orientalis, the journal is a collection of scholarship that crosses academic disciplines and aims to connect researchers, institutions, and ideas using one central theme per volume.

Thanks to a digitization effort made possible with help from Smithsonian Libraries and the Internet Archive, we can now offer Ars Orientalis volumes 1 to 41 free of charge to viewers worldwide. Flip through these pages online, or download files to your digital library for later reading.

Current volume:

Volume 47: New Research on Dress across Asia
Dress intersects with everyday life in a way that few areas of art history do. This intersection with the quotidian, and with popular culture throughout history, provides the student of dress with a valuable vantage point from which to address a range of questions.
Edited by Nancy Micklewright, Ars Orientalis 47 considers key issues in the study of dress in general, and dress in Asia more specifically. These include the divide between the timelessness of “traditional” dress and the fast-paced changes of what we call “fashion”; the categories of evidence that come into play; the ways in which Orientalism has effected the study of dress; and contemporary approaches to the field.



Upcoming Volumes

Theme suggestion? Find more information in Contributor Guidelines, and send proposals to Dr. Nancy Micklewright at micklewrightn@si.edu.


Ars Orientalis Back Issues

Thanks to a digitization effort made possible with help from Smithsonian Libraries and the Internet Archive, we can now offer Ars Orientalis volumes 1 to 41, and its predecessor Ars Islamica volumes 1-16 free of charge to viewers worldwide (read about the journal’s history here). Flip through these pages online, or download files to your digital library for later reading. Titles followed by an asterisk (*) are out of stock in their print editions, but available digitally.

Ars Islamica Back Issues



Open Access Journal: Classical Studies = 西洋古典論集 (Kyoto University)

Open Access Journal: Didaskalia: The Journal for Ancient Performance

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[First posted in AWOL 2 November 2009. Updated 22 August 2018.  n.b.  Founded in 1994, Didaskalia is a Pioneering Open Access Journal]

Didaskalia: The Journal for Ancient Performance
ISSN: 1321-4853
http://www.didaskalia.net/images/home_banner1.jpg
Didaskalia (διδασκαλία) is the term used since ancient times to describe the work a playwright did to teach his chorus and actors the play.  The official records of the dramatic festivals in Athens were the διδασκαλίαι.  Didaskalia now furthers the scholarship of the ancient performance.
Didaskalia is an English-language, online publication about the performance of Greek and Roman drama, dance, and music.  We publish double blind, peer-reviewed scholarship on performance as well as reviews of the professional activity of artists and scholars who work on ancient drama.
We welcome submissions on any aspect of the field, and we provide a uniquely friendly venue for publishing sound, image, and video evidence.  If you would like your work to be reviewed, please write to editor@didaskalia.net at least three weeks in advance of the performance date.  We also seek interviews with practitioners and opinion pieces.

Volume 13 (2016–2017)

13.15 Valedictory from the Editor
Amy R. Cohen
13.14 Review - Sophocles’ Electra at the Dallas Theater Center
Thomas E. Jenkins
13.13 Imperial Pantomime and Satoshi Miyagi’s Medea
William A. Johnson
13.12 Review - Two Tragic Worlds of Soldiers: Not Man Apart Physical Theatre Ensemble’s Ajax in Iraq
Yuko Kurahashi
13.11 Gamel Panel - The Authenticity of Mary-Kay Gamel
Ruby Blondell
13.10 Gamel Panel - Sophocles after Ferguson: Antigone in St. Louis, 2014
Timothy Moore
13.09 Gamel Panel - Navigating Tricky Topics: The Benefits of Performance Pedagogy
Christopher Bungard
13.08 Gamel Panel - Raising the Stakes: Mary-Kay Gamel and the Academic Stage
Amy R. Cohen
13.07 Gamel Panel - Performance, Politics, Pedagogy: a Tribute to Mary-Kay Gamel
C.W. Marshall
13.06 Conversation - Deus Ex Machina at the Long Center for Performing Arts, Austin, Texas
Liz Fisher, Robert Matney, Paul Woodruff, Lucia Woodruff
13.05 Review - 52nd Season of Classical Plays at the Greek Theatre in Syracuse: Sophocles’ Electra, Euripides’ Alcestis
Caterina Barone
13.04 Review - Rhesus at Aristotle's Lyceum
Scott Andrew Cally
13.03 Review - Trachiniae at Minor Latham Playhouse, New York
Claire Catenaccio
13.02 Review - Sophocles’ Philoctetes at Aquila Theatre
Tony Tambasco
13.01 Review - Apollonius’ Argonautika at Gustavus Adolphus College
Eric Dugdale and William Riihiluoma
BACK ISSUES

Open Access Journal: Roda da Fortuna

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Roda da Fortuna
ISSN: 2014-7430 (Print)
The Wheel of Fortune motif originated in Greco-Roman antiquity, probably from the blend of two goddesses: Fors and Fortuna. This combination gave rise to Fors (Fortuna), the goddess who represented fortuity, fate and luck. Christianized in the Middle Ages, the Wheel of Fortune stands for both the Wheel of Life and the Wheel of Chance, it symbolizes the continuous changes, both positive and negative, that the medieval man was subjected to. 

Having had the ISSN (2014-7430) registered at the Biblioteca de Catalunya (Barcelona, Spain), the Wheel of Fortune is an academic journal that aims to publish, in electronic form, texts concerning Antiquity and the Middle Ages with an emphasis on interdisciplinary studies that combine History, Philosophy, Anthropology, Law, Arts, Literature, Philology, etc.

By providing a half-yearly publication, we intend to encourage the development of academic papers regarding the Ancient and Medieval world, thus contributing to dissemination of such researches within the virtual environment.
This journal publishes two issues per year, and the articles are reviewed by peer-reviewers of the Editorial Board and by invited peer-reviewers (ad hoc) each semester. The review is double blind. In case of a positive review and a negative review, the text will be sent to a third peer.

According to the principle that scientific knowledge freely available to the public supports a greater democratization of knowledge, we have decided to provide immediate open access to the journal's content.
Volumes 2012-2017 are available online open access

 

Open Access Journal: CIPEG E-News (Comité international pour l’Égyptologie)

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[First posted in AWOL 8 July 2016, updated 23 August 2018]

CIPEG E-News
http://cipeg.icom.museum/sources/interface/cipeg_head.jpg
The “Comité international pour l’Égyptologie” (CIPEG) is one of 30 International Committees of the International Council of Museums (ICOM). The scope of CIPEG deals with the international representation of Egyptian collections and museums in a worldwide community. CIPEG provides a unique panel for museum professionals and scholars who deal with Ancient Egyptian heritage.

The Mission of CIPEG is to promote collaboration among colleagues for the study, preservation, and presentation of Egyptian collections, monuments and sites. In addition, it supports collections of Egyptian art and archaeology, including the heritage of the Ancient Sudan, with a special focus on smaller collections, within the framework of ICOM and in close co-operation with the International Association of Egyptologists (IAE).

CIPEG also seeks to promote collaboration among museums, universities and research institutes as well as supplying partnership opportunities, sharing resources, knowledge and experience for an international forum, and holding an annual conference. CIPEG frames resolutions and policies to promote actions and, if requested, advises museum staff, scholars or institutions.

Open Access Journal: Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung

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Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung
Introimage
Die Mitteilungen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Athenische Abteilung werden seit 1876 jährlich von der Abteilung Athen des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts herausgegeben.
Die Abteilung Athen wurde 1874 gegründet und am 9. Dezember 1874 offiziell eröffnet.
Bis heute hat die Abteilung ihren Sitz in dem Gebäude, das 1887 von Heinrich Schliemann nach den Plänen Ernst Zillers und Wilhelm Dörfpfelds in der Straße Fidiou 1 errichtet wurde. In den Athenischen Mitteilungen werden Beiträge zur Archäologie und Kulturgeschichte Griechenlands mit seinen angrenzenden Gebieten von der Vorgeschichte bis in die Spätantike veröffentlicht.

1.1876
2.1877
3.1878
4.1879
5.1880
6.1881
7.1882
8.1883
9.1884
10.1885
11.1886
12.1887
13.1888
14.1889
15.1890
16.1891
17.1892
18.1893
19.1894
20.1895
21.1896
22.1897
23.1898
24.1899
25.1900
26.1901
27.1902
28.1903
35.1910
36.1911
37.1912
40.1915
41.1916
42.1917
43.1918
44.1919
45.1920
46.1921
47.1922
48.1923
49.1924
50.1925

New Open Access Journal: Hieratic Studies Online (HSO)

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Hieratic Studies Online (HSO)
The Hieratic Studies Online (HSO) is a peer-reviewed, academic journal dedicated to presenting research on all aspects of hieratic and cursive hieroglyphs, for example:
  • writing materials and techniques
  • the system of the Ancient Egyptian cursive scripts
  • development and interconnections between cursive and monumental scripts
  • palaeography of signs from single scribes, texts, periods, or regions
  • any sources of handwritings and hieratic inscriptions
  • text editions
  • new readings
  • manufacturing of and copying features
  • layout, extratextual notes, corrections, additions, marginalia
HSO is open-access: All articles in this journal can be viewed and downloaded free-of-charge at the Gutenberg Open (University Bibliography Open Access Publications) platform.
HSO has an open format: Accepted papers will be published as soon as possible.  We recommend that you use the CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 DE license (if necessary, however, it is possible to use other license formats). There is no defined publication schedule or deadlines. With support of the authors or editors substantial monographs or proceedings may also be integrated in the publication process.
HSO offers scholars the opportunity to include a large number of colour images where appropriate to the article.
HSO is edited by Svenja A. Gülden, Kyra van der Moezel and Ursula Verhoeven from the project „Altägyptische Kursivschriften“ at the Mainz academy of Sciences and Literature.

1|2016

Ein „nouveau Möller“? Grenzen und Möglichkeiten. Ein working paper zum gleichnamigen Vortrag

Svenja A. Gülden

Though more than 100 years old Möller’s Hieratische Paläographie still is the standard reference work for palaeographic questions. Parts of this palaeography could be complemented and replaced by studies concentrating on specific times spans or sources, but a systematic study of the hieratic script covering all time spans of Egyptian history is– for many reasons – still missing. ‚Ein „nouveau Möller“? Grenzen und Möglichkeiten’ was the title of a paper given at the conference „Ägyptologische ,Binsen‘-Weisheiten“ I, at Mainz in 2011 – this working paper sums up the different aspects discussed in that paper.
urn:nbn:de:hebis:77-publ-557584

Open Access Journal: BABELAO: Electronic Journal for Ancient and Oriental Studies

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[First posted in AWOL 13 June 2015, updated 23 August 2018]]

BABELAO: Electronic Journal for Ancient and Oriental Studies
ISSN: 2034-9491 
Son bulletin, le BABELAO, est conçu comme une revue à vocation scientifique. La revue couvre le domaine de l’Orientalisme sous ses différentes facettes : philologie, paléographie, histoire du monde ancien et oriental, histoire des langues et des littératures comparées, édition des textes, etc. Son Comité de rédaction dont le recrutement est international regroupe des chercheurs qui sont à même d’assurer une expertise dans tous les domaines requis. Les membres sont: Alessandro Bausi (Hambourg), Anne Boud'hors (Paris), Antoine Cavigneaux (Genève), Sabino Chialà (Bose), Bernard Coulie (Louvain-la-Neuve), Alain Delattre (Bruxelles), Didier Devauchelle (Lille), Johannes Den Heijer (Louvain-la-Neuve), Jean-Charles Ducène (Bruxelles), J.Keith Elliott (Leeds), Jean-Daniel Macchi (Genève), Michael Marx (Berlin), Claude Obsomer (Louvain-la-Neuve), Agnès Ouzounian (Paris), Tamara Pataridzé (Louvain-la-Neuve), Paul-Hubert Poirier (Québec), Véronique Somers (Paris, Louvain-la-Neuve), David Taylor (Oxford) et Anton Vojtenko (Moscou).
Le BABELAO est référencé dans AWOL (The Ancient World Online), RHE (Revue d'Histoire Ecclésiastique), Elenchus Bibliographicus (Ephemerides Theologicae Lovanienses)

Ancient Lamps in the J. Paul Getty Museum

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Ancient Lamps in the J. Paul Getty Museum
Jean Bussière and Birgitta Lindros Wohl
http://www.getty.edu/publications/ancientlamps/assets/images/cover-background.jpg
Some 630 lamps in the J. Paul Getty Museum represent production centers that were active across the ancient Mediterranean world between 800 B.C. and A.D. 800. Notable for their marvelous variety—from simple clay saucers that held just oil and a wick to elaborate figural lighting fixtures in bronze and precious metals—the Getty lamps display a number of unprecedented shapes and decors. Most were made in Roman workshops, which met the ubiquitous need for portable illumination in residences, public spaces, religious sanctuaries, and the grave. The omnipresent oil lamp is a font of popular imagery, illustrating myths, nature, and the activities and entertainments of daily life. Presenting a largely unpublished collection, this extensive catalogue is an invaluable resource for specialists in lychnology, art history, and archaeology alike.

New Open Access Journal: Heritage — Open Access Journal of Knowledge, Conservation and Management of Cultural and Natural Heritage

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Heritage — Open Access Journal of Knowledge, Conservation and Management of Cultural and Natural Heritage
ISSN: 2571-9408
heritage-logo

Aims

Heritage is an international, peer-reviewed, open access journal of cultural and natural heritage science published quarterly by MDPI. The publication focuses on knowledge, conservation and management of cultural and natural heritage by sensing technologies, novel methods, best practices and policies.

Scopes

With the inclusion of Articles, Reviews, Perspectives and Communications, Heritage offers an appropriate format for any length or type of submission.
The journal will be organized in six subsections as:
  • Sensing technologies for diagnostics and monitoring of architectural and artistic heritage
  • Innovative solutions and best practices for protection of natural heritage
  • Innovation and Research in the field of Conservation and Recovery of archaeological and architectural heritage
  • Geoscience and earth observation technologies for Heritage risk assessment and mitigation and the study of human past
  • ICT for CH management and Fruition
  • Policies and human science contributions for increasing the cultural and economic role of CH in the society

Heritage, Volume 1 (2018) 

Issue 1 (December 2018) 

Open AccessArticleAssessing the Main Frequencies of Modern and Historical Buildings Using Ambient Noise Recordings: Case Studies in the Historical Cities of Crete (Greece)
Heritage2018, 1(1), 171-188; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage1010012
Received: 21 June 2018 / Revised: 2 August 2018 / Accepted: 10 August 2018 / Published: 15 August 2018
PDF Full-text (3515 KB)
Abstract
Monitoring seismic structural response is an essential issue in earthquake risk assessments and mitigation studies for monumental buildings in order to undertake earthquake disaster management. This study aims at identifying the resonant frequency of soil and modern and historical buildings in three major
[...] Read more. 
Open AccessTechnical NoteNon-Invasive Moisture Detection for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage
Heritage2018, 1(1), 163-170; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage1010011
Received: 23 July 2018 / Revised: 4 August 2018 / Accepted: 8 August 2018 / Published: 10 August 2018
PDF Full-text (5273 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Moisture damage is the most critical issue regarding the preservation and integrity of cultural heritage sites. The electromagnetic (EM) sensitivity to the presence of moisture, in both soils and structural materials, is a well-known phenomenon. Thereby, studying the EM response to the presence
[...] Read more.
Figures 
Open AccessArticleCultural Routes in Kynouria of Arcadia: Geospatial Database Design and Software Development for Web Mapping of the Spatio-Historical Information
Heritage2018, 1(1), 142-162; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage1010010
Received: 19 June 2018 / Revised: 16 July 2018 / Accepted: 16 July 2018 / Published: 20 July 2018
PDF Full-text (8278 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
On the occasion of Kynouria and in order to achieve the protection and projection of antiquities, a web-based model is proposed for highlighting individual monuments and archaeological sites, having in mind the historical and archaeological evidence of the region, the topography, the demographic
[...] Read more.
Figures 
Open AccessArticleAbalone in Diasporic Chinese Culture: The Transformation of Biocultural Traditions through Engagement with the Western Australian Environment
Heritage2018, 1(1), 122-141; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage1010009
Received: 15 May 2018 / Revised: 7 July 2018 / Accepted: 18 July 2018 / Published: 19 July 2018
PDF Full-text (3388 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In October 2017, the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development of Western Australia (WA) promulgated a new regulation on recreational abalone harvesting. A notable change was that, from 2017 on, the annual fishing season in the West Coast Zone was reduced to
[...] Read more.
Figures 
Open AccessArticleHydraulic Chiefdoms in the Eastern Andean Highlands of Colombia
Heritage2018, 1(1), 100-121; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage1010008
Received: 16 May 2018 / Revised: 9 July 2018 / Accepted: 9 July 2018 / Published: 11 July 2018
PDF Full-text (14157 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The natural and cultural heritage of the Valley of Leiva in the Eastern Colombian Andes is closely tied to the Colonial town of Villa de Leyva. The popular tourist destination with rapid economic development and agricultural expansion contrasts sharply with an environment of
[...] Read more.
Figures 
Open AccessArticleGlocal Participatory System for the Recording, Documentation and Promotion of Cultural Heritage: A Greek Case-Study
Heritage2018, 1(1), 88-99; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage1010007
Received: 5 June 2018 / Revised: 21 June 2018 / Accepted: 24 June 2018 / Published: 26 June 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5019 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The recording, documentation and promotion of local cultural heritage has been the subject of significant research from scientists from various fields such as architecture, anthropology, history, folklore, ethnomusicology, and museology. This paper argues that digital technologies could have a catalytic role concerning the
[...] Read more.
Figures 
Open AccessArticleImplementing Sustainability in Retrofitting Heritage Buildings. Case Study: Villa Antoniadis, Alexandria, Egypt
Heritage2018, 1(1), 57-87; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage1010006
Received: 30 March 2018 / Revised: 16 May 2018 / Accepted: 19 May 2018 / Published: 22 May 2018
PDF Full-text (17992 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Sustainable design is believed to stand on the opposite side of heritage conservation. This view is supported by the fact that sustainable design requires invasive measures to implement new technologies and treatments that challenge the principle of minimum intervention in heritage conservation. Another
[...] Read more.
Figures 
Open AccessCase ReportConservation of a Wooden Tomb-Marker from the Jewish Cemetery of Algarrobos in Argentina
Heritage2018, 1(1), 47-56; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage1010005
Received: 2 March 2018 / Revised: 16 May 2018 / Accepted: 20 May 2018 / Published: 22 May 2018
PDF Full-text (3521 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The state of conservation of some tombs in the Jewish Cemetery of Algarrobos in Colonia Mauricio, Buenos Aires, Argentina was evaluated. A lot of material was found, but only two tomb-markers were done on wood. They were in a state of serious deterioration,
[...] Read more.
Figures 
Open AccessEditorialHeritage—An Open Access Journal of Knowledge, Conservation, and Management of Cultural and Natural Heritage
Heritage2018, 1(1), 45-46; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage1010004
Received: 7 May 2018 / Revised: 14 May 2018 / Accepted: 14 May 2018 / Published: 14 May 2018
PDF Full-text (169 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Over the last fifteen years, studies on cultural heritage (CH) have assumed a methodological, cultural, and scientific perspective, aimed at creating an area in which to carry out frontier research to be replicated in other domains [...] Full article 
Open AccessArticleBiological Profile Estimation Based on Footprints and Shoeprints from Bracara Augusta Figlinae (Brick Workshops)
Heritage2018, 1(1), 33-44; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage1010003
Received: 22 March 2018 / Revised: 8 May 2018 / Accepted: 9 May 2018 / Published: 14 May 2018
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Abstract
Biological profile estimation is an important task of biological and forensic anthropologists. This includes sex, age, ancestry, and body morphology. In bioarchaeology, the biological profile is useful to analyze paleodemography, secular trends, paleopathology, and genetic processes, for example. Foot dimensions, footprints, and shoeprints
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heritage and Territory)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticleA Spatial Pattern Analysis of Frontier Passes in China’s Northern Silk Road Region Using a Scale Optimization BLR Archaeological Predictive Model
Heritage2018, 1(1), 15-32; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage1010002
Received: 5 February 2018 / Revised: 10 March 2018 / Accepted: 12 March 2018 / Published: 20 March 2018
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Abstract
In China’s Northern Silk Road (CNSR) region, dozens of frontier passes built and fortified at critical intersections were exploited starting at approximately 114 B.C. to guarantee caravan safety. Understanding the pattern of these pass sites is helpful in understanding the defense and trading
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticleIntegrated Investigation of Built Heritage Monuments: The Case Study of Paphos Harbour Castle, Cyprus
Heritage2018, 1(1), 1-14; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage1010001
Received: 25 February 2018 / Revised: 6 March 2018 / Accepted: 6 March 2018 / Published: 14 March 2018
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Abstract
The state of preservation of built heritage monuments is often evaluated by means of several destructive techniques, which are mainly focused on the analysis of small parts of the monuments’ construction materials. The necessary sampling for the accomplishment of these destructive analyses is
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(This article belongs to the collection Feature Papers)
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Échanger en Méditerranée: Acteurs, pratiques et normes dans les mondes anciens

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Échanger en Méditerranée: Acteurs, pratiques et normes dans les mondes anciens
Échanger en Méditerranée
Si les travaux abondent sur la place et la nature du marché dans l’économie antique, sur le poids économique de l’esclavage, sur la question des avancées techniques ou celles des circulations de marchandises, les conditions en elles-mêmes de l’échange n’ont que peu retenu l’attention des spécialistes, ou alors de manière ponctuelle et isolée. Et pourtant, la question de la langue dans laquelle se faisait et était libellée la transaction, celle de l’armature juridique qui encadrait cette de...

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Open access online for 60 days: Money, Currency and Crisis: In Search of Trust, 2000 BC to AD 2000

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Money, Currency and Crisis: In Search of Trust, 2000 BC to AD 2000
Edited by R.J. van der Spek, Bas van Leeuwen
Routledge
378 pages | 44 B/W Illus.
Hardback: 9781138628359
$160.00
eBook (VitalSource) : 9781315210711
 Purchase eBook $54.95
<https://www.routledge.com/Money-Currency-and-Crisis-In-Search-of-Trust-2000-BC-to-AD-2000/van-der-Spek-van-Leeuwen/p/book/9781138628359>

This volume is in open access online for 60 days. It can be read, but
not downloaded. Click here: <https://rdcu.be/4fqi>

The book pays ample attention to ancient Mesopotamia with
contributions by Jan Gerrit Dercksen (Old Assyrian), Michael Jursa
(Old and New Babylonian), Kristin Kleber (Kassite), introductions,
conclusions and coinage in the Hellenistic Near East (Bert van der
Spek). But also the Greco-Roman world, Medieval and early modern
Europe, China through the ages, and the 20th century. The focus is on
monetary policy and trust.

A must read for those interested in comparative history and
"historical economics".