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Open Access Journal: Culture Without Context: Newsletter of the Illicit Antiquities Research Centre

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[First posted in AWOL 20 November 2012, updated 29 September 2017]

Culture Without Context: Newsletter of the Illicit Antiquities Research Centre
ISSN: 1464-1925
http://traffickingculture.org/app/themes/trafficking/images/header.png
The Illicit Antiquities Research Centre (IARC) was established in 1996 at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research at the University of Cambridge, with a mission to research and raise awareness of the trade in illicit antiquities. It was closed in 2007. As part of its mission, the IARC published a bi-annual newsletter, Culture Without Context, which contained news, commentary and original research on all aspects of the trade. The McDonald Institute has kindly allowed us to make available here for download pdfs of the complete run of twenty issues.

Society for the Oral Reading of Greek and Latin Literature (SORGLL)

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[First listed in AWOL 6 December 2012, updates 30 September 2017]

Society for the Oral Reading of Greek and Latin Literature (SORGLL)
http://www.rhapsodes.fll.vt.edu/images/rhapsodos5.jpg
It is generally acknowledged that the literature of the Greeks and Romans is among the most beautiful and powerful expressions of the human mind. It is also generally known that this body of literature was created with the intention of being orally performed and aurally experienced by a group of listeners, large or small, and was not intended to be read silently with the eyes alone. The element of sound is therefore fundamental to a full esthetic experience and understanding of Greek and Latin literature. And yet, the traditional method of teaching Greek and Latin ignores or neglects the sounds of these languages, as if they were of little or no importance, thus depriving students of the basic literary reward of hearing and reproducing beautiful poetry. It is as if students were to study Mozart solely from musical scores and not be given the opportunity of hearing his music. It is the aim or our Society to encourage students and teachers to listen to and to reproduce the sounds of Greek and Latin literature, thereby enriching the whole study process of these languages. Fortunately, linguistic and metrical research of the last century now permits us to acquire a close approximation of the pronunciation of classical Greek and Latin, a result which we call the "restored pronunciation" (basic bibliography below). Our Society feels that it is our professional duty to use the results of this research in our teaching of Greek and Latin as a means for achieving maximum authenticity and esthetic pleasure in the reading of Greek and Latin literary works. As a means toward this end, our Society presents programs oriented to the oral performance of Classical literature at the annual APA meetings, we publish a newsletter, we have established this website to present pertinent information, audio clips, queries and discussion, while several members or our Society regularly give recitals of Greek and Latin literature in schools, colleges and universities throughout the country.

We cordially invite you to join the Society for the Oral Reading of Greek and Latin Literature and to share our experience in hearing and reproducing the true sounds of Homer, Vergil, and the other Classical authors.

Home

Catullus 5

Read in the restored pronunciation of classical Latin
by Robert P. Sonkowsky, University of Minnesota.
 
Cicero, In Catilinam I.1-3

Read in the restored pronunciation of classical Latin
by Robert P. Sonkowsky, University of Minnesota.
 
Horace, Odes 1.22  

Read in the restored pronunciation of classical Latin
by Robert P. Sonkowsky, University of Minnesota.
 
Juvenal, Satire I.1-30  
Read in the restored pronunciation of classical Latin
by Mark Miner, University of Georgia.

 
Martial, Epigrams I.96, V.41, X.30 
Read in the restored pronunciation of classical Latin
by Wakefield Foster, University of Missouri.

 
Ovid, Metamorphoses 8.183-235 
Read in the restored pronunciation of classical Latin
by Stephen G. Daitz, City University of New York.

 
Seneca, Thyestes 766-804  
Read in the restored pronunciation of classical Latin
by Katharina Volk, Columbia University.


Statius, Thebaid I. 46-87

Read in the restored pronunciation of classical Latin
by Stephen G. Daitz, City University of New York.
 
Terence, Eunuch 232-264

Read in the restored pronunciation of classical Latin
by Matthew Dillon, Loyola University.

 
Vergil, Aeneid, Book 1, 1-49

Read in the restored pronunciation of classical Latin
by Robert P. Sonkowsky, University of Minnesota.
 
Vergil, Aeneid, Book 4, 296-396

Read in the restored pronunciation of classical Latin
by Stephen G. Daitz, City University of New York.

Alkman 58
       read in the restored pronunciation of classical Greek
       by Stephen G. Daitz, City University of New York.
 
Arkhilokhos 67
       read in the restored pronunciation of classical Greek
       by Stephen G. Daitz, City University of New York.
 
Aristophanes,  Birds 227-262
       read in the restored pronunciation of classical Greek
       by Stephen G. Daitz, City University of New York.
 
Demosthenes, On the Crown 199-208
       read in the restored pronunciation of classical Greek
       by Stephen G. Daitz, City University of New York.
 
Euripides, Trojan Women 740-779
       read in the restored pronunciation of classical Greek
       by Stephen G. Daitz, City University of New York.
 
Homer, Iliad, Book 1, lines 1-52
       read in the restored pronunciation of classical Greek
       by Stephen G. Daitz, City University of New York.
 
Menander, Dyskolos, lines 711-747
       read in the restored pronunciation of classical Greek
       by Mark Miner, University of Georgia.
 
Pindar, Olympian 1.1-58
       read in the restored pronunciation of classical Greek
       by William Mullen, Bard College.
 
Sappho 1
       read in the restored pronunciation of classical Greek
       by Stephen G. Daitz, City University of New York.
 
Sophokles, Elektra 1126-1170
       read in the restored pronunciation of classical Greek
       by Rachel Kitzinger, Vassar College.
 

And see also
Aural Akkadian: Babylonian and Assyrian Poetry and Literature: An Archive of Recordings


HyperEpos: Epic on the Internet

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HyperEpos: Epic on the Internet
Responding to the lack of genre-based sites on the web, I've gathered here an array of sites focused on epic poetry, aiming for the occasionally quirky as well as the canonical vision of the genre.  In addition to the links to individual poems and poets, I've tried to incorporate a few key sites for chronological study. Thus, links to sites like Perseus, The Labyrinth or Romantic Circles, with all their wealth of connections, are included at the bottom of the appropriate page. Your comments and suggestions for inclusion or updating are appreciated.  Like all good sites, this one should be perpetually evolving, and appropriately enough, in the midst of things. I update the pages as often as I can (but time's wingéd chariot hurries near).
For familiarity's sake, the organization is (loosely) chronological, with a few pages (Non-Western, American, and Women's Epic) based in kinds rather than times of origin.  The chronologies as well as the selections currently show too clearly my own as well as the Internet's strong Anglo-American bias. And I have finally incorporated a search page for this directory, which may help if you're not sure where to start looking.

Note:  Though I do include links to some creative, occasionally naive endeavors, I try not to include sites like the following (straight from the original):  "Oral poets can whole heroic poems a formulae in construction of their epics although in this case Homer did not."

Search HyperEpos
General Epic Resources
Women's Epic
Non-Western Epic
American Epic
Pre-Classical Epic
Homeric Epic
Other Greek Epic
Latin Epic
Medieval Epic
Renaissance Epic
Neoclassical Epic
Romantic Epic
Victorian Epic
Modernist Epic
Contemporary Epic

Dag Norberg, A Practical Handbook of Medieval Latin (Paris 1980)

Babylonian and Assyrian Poetry and Literature: An Archive of Recordings

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 [First posted in AWOL 25 July 2015, updated 1 October 2017]

Babylonian and Assyrian Poetry and Literature:  An Archive of Recordings
This website collects recordings of modern Assyriologists reading ancient Babylonian and Assyrian poetry and literature aloud in the original language. It is the first undertaking of its kind, and accordingly some explanation of its aims is called for.
It is intended to serve several purposes, some for Assyriologists, and some for the wider public. First, it aims to foster interest among students of Babylonia and Assyria in how these civilisations’ works of verbal art were read aloud in the past, and how they should be read aloud today.
Second, it provides a forum in which scholars who have theories about Babylonian and Assyrian pronunciation, metre, etc. can present a concrete example of how their theories sound in practice. (In this function the archive does not of course aim to replace scholarly discussion in established channels, but rather to provide a useful complement to written publications).
Third, as a record of the ways in which contemporary scholars read Babylonian and Assyrian, it will some day serve a historical function. Many great Assyriologists, including some who had influential theories of Babylonian metre and phonology, passed into history without leaving a single recording of how they read Babylonian and Assyrian. This archive will provide at least some record of how scholars read Babylonian and Assyrian in the twenty-first century.
Finally, but not least, the questions which students of ancient languages most frequently hear from laymen are: "How did they sound? And how do you know?". This website is meant to serve as an introduction to these issues, providing the public with some idea of how modern Assyriologists think Babylonian and Assyrian were pronounced.

The Recordings

Special characters (tsade and tet) are in Steve Tinney's Ungkam font, derived from sil.org's Gentium font. To display them correctly, download the font from oracc.museum.upenn.edu/doc/user/fonts. The download is free. There are both a Mac Suitcase version and a Win/Linux OpenType version.

The Old Babylonian Period (c. 1900-1500 BCE)

Ammi-Ditana’s Hymn to Ishtar
The Codex Hammurabi
The Epic of Gilgamesh, Old Babylonian Version, Tablet II
The Epic of Gilgamesh, Old Babylonian Version, BM+VAT
The Epic of Anzû, Old Babylonian Version, Tablet II
Atra-Hasīs, Old Babylonian Version, Tablet I
Diviner's Prayer to the Gods of the Night
Incantation for Dog Bite
Letter of Marduk-nāṣir to Ruttum (AbB III 15)
Letter of Kurkurtum to Erīb-Sîn (AbB XII 89)

The First Millennium BC

The Epic of Gilgamesh, Standard Version, Tablet XI
The Babylonian Poem of the Righteous Sufferer (Ludlul bēl nēmeqi), Tablet II
The Babylonian Epic of Creation (Enūma elîš), Tablet I
Incantation for Tooth Worm
Ištar's Descent to the Netherworld
The Šamaš Hymn
And see also:

Open Access Monograph Series: Excavations at Tepe Yahya, Iran

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[First posted in AWOL 4 March 2012, updated 1 October 2017]

Excavations at Tepe Yahya, Iran in AMAR

One of a series of AWOL pages seeking to pull together publication series digitized and served through AMAR: Archive of Mesopotamian Archaeological Site Reports

See more Series in AMAR

TOCS-IN: Tables of Contents of Journals of Interest to Classicists

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First posted in AWOL 23 October 2014, updates 2 October 2017]

TOCS-IN: Tables of Contents of Journals of Interest to Classicists
TOCS-IN
TOCS-IN provides the tables of contents of a selection of Classics, Near Eastern Studies, and Religion journals, both in text format and through a Web search program. Where possible, links are given with articles of which the full text or an abstract is available online (about 15%).
The project began to archive current tables of contents in 1992, and now contains nearly 200 journals, and over 75,000 articles, in a database at Toronto. In addition, the Louvain mirror site archives much additional material for some of the journals before 1992. Searches of all data can be made at both sites. 

Some collections of articles (e.g., Festschriften) are also now included. See the list of collections.

SEARCH (Toronto)
RECHERCHE (à Louvain)

Books: Collections of articles

  

Open Access Journal: Ágora. Estudos Clássicos em Debate

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[First posted in AWOL 29 October 2009. Updated 3 October 2017]

Ágora. Estudos Clássicos em Debate
ISSN: 0874-5498
http://revistas.ua.pt/public/journals/1/homeHeaderTitleImage_pt_PT.jpg
Ágora. Estudos Clássicos em Debate é uma nova revista que pretende estar aberta, em visão alargada, a todas as temáticas relacionadas com os estudos clássicos desde os primórdios da Literatura e da Cultura Grego-latinas até à receção que estas literaturas e culturas continuam a ter na atualidade nas civilizações de matriz ocidental, sem esquecer as problemáticas ligadas ao ensino do Grego e do Latim e a inserção destas duas línguas nos diversos curricula dos diferentes graus de ensino.



































1999



See AWOL's List of




Steindorff, Georg, Robert Heidenreich, and D. Marcks. Aniba. [Le Caire]: Service des antiquités de l'Égypte, 1935-1937.

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Steindorff, Georg, Robert Heidenreich, and D. Marcks. Aniba. [Le Caire]: Service des antiquités de l'Égypte, 1935-1937.
Aniba is located in Nubia, about 230 kms south of Aswan. Currently under the waters of Lake Nasser, the site was an important city strategically located in one of the most fertile regions of Lower Nubia during Antiquity.
The oldest remains in Aniba date from about 3000 BC and belong to the culture of the A Group. In the Middle Kingdom, a fortress was built near a small town. At the beginning of the New Kingdom, the city was extended and occupied an area of about 200 x 400 m, surrounded by an enclosure wall. In the town proper, a temple is erected, dedicated to the Horus of Miam. Huge cemeteries surrounded the city, and some of their tombs were built in a purely Egyptian style. One of them belonged to the viceroy of Kush, Panehesy.
Steindorff G. Aniba. Flights. I-III, J.J. Augustin, Glückstadt-Hamburg, 1935, 253 pages, 98 plates, First Edition.
 

SFDAS: Specialized publications on line

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Section Française de la direction des antiquités du Soudan: Specialized publications on line

sfdas : Section française de la direction des antiquités du Soudan

Founded in 1967 at the initiative of Jean Vercoutter, the SFDAS was officially created in 1969. It was successively run by André Vila (1969-1975), Francis Geus (1975-1984), Jacques Reinold (1984-2000), Francis Geus (2000-2004), Vincent Rondot (2005-2009), Claude Rilly (2009-2014) and, since September 2014, by Vincent Francigny. In charge of cooperating with the Sudanese Department of Antiquities in its field activities (excavations and prospection), the SFDAS took part in the last rescue operations of the Nubian campaign which preceded the water impoundment in the Aswan dam reservoir. It then pursued the systematic inventory of the sites of the Nile Valley south of the lake. It has also conducted several planned excavations, namely on the sites of Missiminia (Napatan, Meroitic, X-group and Christian necropolis), Kadada (Neolithic, Meroitic and post-Meroitic necropolis), Kadruka (Neolithic funeral mound) and El-Hobagi (post-Meroitic burial mound).
SNRSudan Notes and Records
The Sudan Notes and Records are now available online.
To learn more

L’écriture méroïtique



L’écriture méroïtique

Synthesis of the principles of Meroitic writing and its appearance. Click on the PDF attached to access to work.
Read more

The quest for water and the diffusion of Northern East Sudanic languages from the fourth to the first millenia BCE

From the Yellow Nile to the Blue Nile.

This lecture was delivered in ECAS 2009 (3rd European Conference on African Studies, Panel 142: African waters - water in Africa, barriers, paths, and resources: their impact on language, literature and history of people) in Leipzig, 4 to 7 June 2009.
Read more

Royal Cemeteries of Kush


RCK

The five volumes of the Royal Cemeteries of Kush are now available online. Please click on the following files to download.
Read more

Meroitic Newsletters


MNL

The Meroitic Newsletters are now available online. Please click on the associated PDF files to download.
Read more

Archaeological Survey of Nubia


ASN

The six volumes of the Archaeological Survey of Nubia are now available online.
Read more

Dotawo 3


Dotawo 3

The third volume of Dotawo, guest-edited by Marc Maillot, is dedicated to Know-Hows and Techniques in Ancient Sudan. This collection of articles is the result of a workshop held at Lille University on September 5 and 6, 2013, which brought together several Sudanese archaeology scholars, from architecture to iron production through pottery and textile industry.
Read more

Fouilles d’Oxford en Nubie


Fouilles d'Oxford en Nubie

L’Université Oxford a organisé une série d’expéditions au sud de l’Égypte et du Soudan à partir de 1910, dirigée et financée en grande partie par Francis Lewellyn Griffith, le premier professeur d’égyptologie à Oxford. Les travaux ont été effectués entre 1910 et 1913, puis de 1929 à 1931 dans des sites tels que Faras, Kawa et Sanam. Après la mort de Griffith en 1934, Sir Laurence Kirwan dirige les fouilles d’Oxford à Firka (1934-1935) et à Kawa (1935-1936).
Read more

Ballana/Qustul


Ballana/Qustul

Ballana was a cemetery in Lower Nubia. It was excavated by Walter Bryan Emery between 1928 and 1931 as a rescue project before the construction of the high dam at Aswan. A total of 122 tombs were found under huge artificial mounds. They date to the time after the collapse of the Meroitic state but before the founding of the Christian Nubian kingdoms, around AD 350 to 600. They usually featured one or several underground chambers, with one main burial chamber. Some tombs were found unlooted, but even the robbed burials still proved to contain many burial goods.
Read more

Karanog


Karanog

In Sudanese Nubia, L. Woolley and D. R. MacIver were the first to undertake an excavation program of a Meroitic city and its associated cemetery at the site of Karanog. This excavation of the University of Pennsylvania in 1909 documented the Meroitic architecture in a still unstudied area and describes an archaeological material that differs from the sites of the Butana region.
Read more

Buhen


Buhen

Buhen was an ancient Egyptian settlement situated on the West bank of the Nile below the Second Cataract. On the East bank, across the river, was located an ancient settlement of Wadi Halfa. Buhen is known for its large fortress, probably constructed during the rule of Senusret III in around 1860 BC (12th dynasty). Senusret III conducted four campaigns into Kush and established a line of forts within signalling distance of one another; Buhen was the northernmost of these. The other forts along the banks were Mirgissa, Shalfak, Uronarti, Askut, Dabenarti, Semna, and Kumma. The fortress at Buhen is now submerged under Lake Nasser as a result of the construction of the Aswan Dam in 1964.
Read more

Excavations at Kerma


Excavations at Kerma

Harvard African studies
George Andrew Reisner
Egyptian Expedition of Harvard University and the Boston Museum of Fine Arts
Peabody Museum of Harvard University, 1923
Read more

Aniba


Aniba

Steindorff G. Aniba. Vols. I-III, J.J. Augustin, Glückstadt-Hamburg, 1935, 253 pages, 98 plates. First Edition.
Read more



Latest releases




'KUSH XIX'

Journal of the National Corporation for Antiquities and Museums


Soleb & Sedeinga

SFDAS is pleased to propose this new online booklet on the Soleb and Sedeinga sites.

New in Cuneiform Digital Library Preprints (CDLP)

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On behalf of the CDLI, I am pleased to announce the publication of three new contributions to the series Cuneiform Digital Library Preprints (CDLP)


Please note that CDLP 7.0 (The Structure of Prices in the neo-Sumerian Economy (I): Barley:Silver Price Ratios) is also in preparation for publication in CDLJ

Scholars are encouraged to send contributions to the CDLP at <bertrand.lafont@mae.cnrs.fr>

Newly added to Orbis Biblicus et Orientalis Online

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Newly added to Orbis Biblicus et Orientalis Online

  • Anbar, Moshé (1991). Les tribus amurrites de Mari. Freiburg, Switzerland / Göttingen, Germany: Universitätsverlag / Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht.

Godmy's Searchable Digitized Latin & Greek Lexica

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 [First posted in AWOL 11 June 2013, updated 4 October 2017]

Godmy'sSearchable Digitized Latin & Greek Lexica

Lexica Latino-Graeca & Graeco-Latina:

1. Novum Lexicum Manuale Latino-Graecum & Graeco-Latinum (1767, ed. 1827, Benjamin Hedericus)
   - You can type the Greek with the Greek letters or you can type with the Latin letters, using the official Greek beta-code (see the picture): η = h; θ = q; χ = x; υ = u; ψ = y; ω = w; ξ = c
   - There is always an option to go to the next/previous page on the bottom of the page
        Gr-Lat: The cover, preface and other pages   and    Lat-Gr: The cover, preface and other pages
2. Schrevelius: Lexicum Manuale Latino-Greacum & Graeco-Latinum (1654, ed. 1832, Cornelius Schrevelius)
   - You can type the Greek with the Greek letters or you can type with the Latin letters, using the official Greek beta-code (see the picture): η = h; θ = q; χ = x; υ = u; ψ = y; ω = w; ξ = c
   - There is always an option to go to the next/previous page on the bottom of the page
   - Use the the arrow keys on your keyboard for easier navigation, if needed.
        Gr-Lat: The cover, preface and other pages

Scan: Google Books; Web/search tech. realization: Godmy; Idea, indexing of the pages, former tech. realization: Quasus

Lexica Graeca:

1. Etymological Dictionary of Ancient Greek (1860, F.E.J. Valpy)
   - You can type the Greek with the Greek letters or you can type with the Latin letters, using the official Greek beta-code (see the picture): η = h; θ = q; χ = x; υ = u; ψ = y; ω = w; ξ = c
   - There is always an option to go to the next/previous page on the bottom of the page
        Appendix and alterations   and    The cover, preface and other pages

Scan: Google Books; Web/search tech. realization: Godmy

Lexica Latina:

1. Etymological Dictionary of Latin (1827, F.E.J. Valpy) + an appendix
   - There is always an option to go to the next/previous page on the bottom of the page
   - An appendix is always accessible in the bottom of the page in cases, when you are required "to see an appendix"
        Additions and alterations   and    Preface

2. Forcellini: Lexicon Totius Latinitatis (Latino-Latinum) (1775, reprint 1940, Egidio Forcellini & Giuseppe Furlanetto)
   - In the search you have to make a distinction between J and I and U and V or it searches incorrectly!
   - Many thanks to Documenta Catholica Omnia which has supplied the PDF files and made them publicly available.
   - The indexing of the pages by Quasus.
   - There is always an option to go to the next/previous page on the bottom of the page
        Cover pages

3. Saxo: Vademecum in opus Saxonis et alia opera Danica compendium ex indice verborum (La-La, MEDIAE Aetatis) (1998, Franz Blatt & Reimer Hemmingsen)    N E W
   - FULLY DIGITAL and more important: with a search engine (done by me)
   - This version has been digitized before (without a search engine) by the author of this website, to whom I owe my gratitude!
   - Iohannes Brunensis has let me know about its existence.
        Preface   and    Ad Usum   and    Index abbreviationum

4. Wagner: Lexicon Latinum (Thesaurus, Latino-Latinum) (1878, P. Franc Wagner)
   - The distinction between J and I and U and V has to be made in the search to get correct results!
   - Personal thanks to Iohannes Brunensis, without whose blog I would never know about this.
   - Big thanks to Documenta Catholica Omnia which has supplied the PDF file and made it publicly available.
   - There is always an option to go to the next/previous page on the bottom of the page
        Abbreviations & Cover page

Scan: Google Books (mostly); Indexing of the pages, tech. realization: Godmy; Original idea by: Q.

Other languages dictionaries

Lexica Latino-Bohemica & Bohemico-Latina:

1. Sedláček: Kapesní slovník latinsko-český a česko-latinský (1936, reprint 2011 Levné Knihy, Prof. Dr. J. Sedláček)
   - Češtinu pište s diakritikou! Jinak vám to bude hledat špatně.
   - Vždy vespod stránky jsou tlačítka next/previous page, kterými lze přejít na další nebo předchozí stránku ve slovníku
   - Jednalo se o scan reprintu kapesního vydání (na které se nevztahují již autorská práva), tudíž kvalita písma i při vysokém
    scanovacím rozlišení nemůže dosahovat kvalit standardních formátů.
   - Scan též lehce utrpěl na kvalitě nutným převodem do dvou barev: čené a bílé (z důvodu velikosti/rychlosti)
        Dodatky a opravy   a    Obálka knihy a další

2. Schenk: Slovník k Caesarovým pamětem o válce galské - latinsko-český (1921, Rudolf Schenk)
   - Nejčastější výrazy, slovesa a hlavně vlastní jména/jména kmenů použita v Caesarovi, nejedná se o klasický lat-čes slovník.
   - Vždy vespod stránky jsou tlačítka next/previous page, kterými lze přejít na další nebo předchozí stránku ve slovníku
   - Na tuto knihu se již nevztahují autorská Práva.
        Seznam použitých zkratek 1 a Seznam použitých zkratek 2   a    Obálka knihy a předmluva

Open Access Introductions to Iranian Languages

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The Hieroglyphics Initiative

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The Hieroglyphics Initiative
The Challenge

The ancient Egyptians used hieroglyphics for over 3000 years. We’re focusing on hieroglyphics from the Middle Egyptian language, which was used from 2000 BC until as late as the 4th Century AD.

Because of their age, the quality of inscriptions carved on stone three to four thousand years ago varies greatly – with many having missing or damaged portions.

It’s our belief that machine learning can transform the process of collating, cataloguing and understanding the written language of the Pharaohs.

The Plan
As announced at the launch of The Hieroglyphics Initiative on 27th September 2017, we have begun compiling data, developing tools and reaching out to the academic community for collaboration partners.
Our aim is to release the first results by the end of the year, at which point we will open up the project data and technology to everyone.

Zipang: popularising the literature of ancient Iraq through the art of oral storytelling

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Zipang: popularising the literature of ancient Iraq through the art of oral storytelling
  http://www.zipang.org.uk/images/welcome.jpg
The literature of Mesopotamia has lain dormant on clay tablets for more than 2000 years. Breathing new life into this literature through the art of oral storytelling is the ZIPANG mission.

Who was Enheduanna?

The Enheduanna Society is a registered heritage education charity (registration number 1097515) founded in 2002 to popularise the literature of Ancient Iraq (Mesopotamia) through the art of oral storytelling. The woman it takes its name from lived in Mesopotamia in about 2300 BCE, and was the world’s first named poet.
Enheduanna’s surviving work, originally written in Sumerian, consists of three poems to the goddess Inanna and forty temple hymns. Click here for more information about Enheduanna: her life, her world, her poetry.
Click here for more information about the background and history of the Society.

ZIPANG Mesopotamian storytelling

The ZIPANG Mesopotamian storytellers June Peters, Fran Hazelton and Badia Obaid tell and teach others to tell stories from ancient Iraq through the art of oral storytelling. June and Fran tell and teach in English. Badia tells and teaches in Arabic
The ZIPANG Mesopotamian story­tellers began performing in 1997 when June Peters and Fran Hazelton told the Gilgamesh Epic at the Kufa Gallery in London, based on a new translation by Andrew George.
Since then there have been ZIPANG performances in private parties, story­telling clubs, Oxford, Cambridge and London universities, the October Gallery, the Hayward Gallery, the British Museum, the Ashmolean Museum, the Story Museum, the Poetry Café in Covent Garden, the Reel Iraq Festival in Shoreditch, the Battersea Barge on the River Thames, and at a forest story­telling festival in Morocco.
ZIPANG storytellers make a unique contribution to the transmission of knowledge about ancient Iraq. They pass on by word of mouth the stories of Mesopotamian myths and poetry to those who want to know them.
 

Bibliothèque des Écoles françaises d'Athènes et de Rome at Persée

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[First posted in AWOL 18 March 2014, updates 5 October 2017]

Bibliothèque des Écoles françaises d'Athènes et de Rome at Persée
En 1875 Albert Dumont est nommé directeur de l'École Française d'Athènes après avoir été sous-directeur de son ancienne succursale romaine, qui devient alors autonome. Il veut établir l'École en tant que centre d'érudition et de recherche scientifique.

Il fonde pour cela en 1876 l'Institut de Correspondance hellénique, associant savants grecs et français lors de séances publiques, dont une revue, le Bulletin de Correspondance hellénique, concentrera dès 1877 les communications et informations jusque-là éparpillés.

Mais c'est dès 1876 qu'il lance en collaboration avec la jeune École de Rome la collection de la Bibliothèque des Écoles françaises d'Athènes et de Rome (BEFAR) pour publier les thèses et travaux des membres des deux écoles.

New From the Oriental Institute: Book of the Dead: Becoming God in Ancient Egypt

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Book of the Dead: Becoming God in Ancient Egypt
Edited by Foy Scalf

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Discover how the ancient Egyptians controlled their immortal destiny! The book explores what the Book of the Dead was believed to do, how it worked, how it was made, and what happened to it. Presenting the newest research on the Book of the Dead through text and elaborate imagery, one learns what the Book of the Dead meant to ancient Egyptians and how they sought to live forever as gods. There are nearly 400 illustrations, including the famous Papyrus Milbank.

Table of Contents

Foreword
Preface
Introduction: Preparing for the Afterlife in Ancient Egypt. Foy Scalf
List of Contributors
Egyptian Chronology
Map of Principal Areas and Sites Mentioned in the Text

I. THE BIRTH OF THE BOOK OF THE DEAD
1. What Is the Book of the Dead. Foy Scalf
2. The Origins and Early Development of the Book of the Dead. Peter F. Dorman
3. Language and Script in the Book of the Dead. Emily Cole
4. The Significance of the Book of the Dead Vignettes. Irmtraut Munro

II. PRODUCTION AND USE
5. How a Book of the Dead Manuscript Was Produced. Holger Kockelmann
6. The Ritual Context of the Book of the Dead. Yekaterina Barbash
7. Transmission of Funerary Literature: Saite through Ptolemaic Periods. Malcolm Mosher Jr.
8. The Archaeology of the Book of the Dead. Isabelle Régen

III. MAGIC AND THEOLOGY
9. Divinization and Empowerment of the Dead. Robert K. Ritner
10. The Mysteries of Osiris. Andrea Kucharek
11. Gods, Spirits, Demons of the Book of the Dead. Rita Lucarellli

IV. DEATH AND REDISCOVERY
12. The Death of the Book of the Dead. Foy Scalf
13. The Rediscovery of the Book of the Dead. Barbara Lüscher
14. Necrobibliomania: (Mis)appropriations of the Book of the Dead. Steve Vinson

V. CATALOG
-- Human Remains
-- Linen Bandages
-- Heart Scarabs
-- Sarcophagi and Coffins
-- Papyri Cases
-- Papyri
-- Magic Bricks
-- Funerary Figures
-- Stelae
-- Tomb Reliefs
-- Statues and Figures of Deities
-- Scribal Materials
Checklist of the Exhibit
Concordance of Museum Registration Numbers
Bibliography
  • Oriental Institute Museum Publications 39
  • Chicago: The Oriental Institute, 2017
  • ISBN-13: 978-1-61491-038-1
  • Pp. 376; 373 illustrations (most color)
  • 9 x 11.5 inches, paperback
  • $34.95

For an up to date list of all Oriental Institute publications available online see:

Open Access Journal: Annuaire de l'École pratique des hautes études, section des sciences historiques et philologiques

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 [First posted in AWOL 9 July 2009. Updated 6 October 2017]

Annuaire de l'École pratique des hautes études, section des sciences historiques et philologiques
ISSN: 1969-6310
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L'Annuaire de l'École pratique des hautes études, section des sciences religieuses, est une publication annuelle qui regroupe principalement les comptes rendus des conférences des enseignants-chercheurs de la s
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Chroniques de la section des Sciences historiques et philologiques – année 2015-2016


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Berichtigungsliste der Griechischen Papyrusurkunden aus Ägypten, Dreizehnter Band