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Open Access Journal: Journal for Interdisciplinary Biblical Studies (JIBS)

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ISSN: 2633-0695
journal of Interdisciplinary Biblical Studies
 JIBS is a peer-reviewed, open access journal dedicated to publishing cutting edge articles that embody interdisciplinary, social justice-oriented, feminist, queer, and innovative biblical scholarship. We welcome submissions that challenge canonical and/or disciplinary norms and boundaries or that query the field of biblical studies’ relationship to the broader investigation of human religion, culture, and literature. JIBS will publish two issues a year in summer and in winter.

Volume 2, Issue 1

Autumn 2020 —Activism in the Biblical Studies Classroom: Global Perspectives

Guest Editor: Johanna Stiebert

With special thanks to Shayna Sheinfeld, interim Editor in Chief

Johanna Stiebert, “Introduction: Activism in the Biblical Studies Classroom,” 1-12.
Musa W. Dube, “On Becoming a Change Agent: Journeys of Teaching Gender and Health in an African Crisis Context,” 13-28.

KEYWORDS: Botswana; Change Agent; HIV and AIDS; Gugu Dlamini; Mmutle

Rhiannon Graybill, “Gender, Sexuality, and the Bible: Teaching for Social Justice,” 29-49

KEYWORDS: Pedagogy; Queer; Hospitality; Killjoy

Darla Schumm & Jennifer L. Koosed, “Armies of Misfits: Mobility Disabilities and Activism in the Biblical Studies Classroom,” 50-65.

KEYWORDS: Disability; Activism; Misfitting; 2 Samuel 5: 6–8; Mark 2: 1–12; Feminist Disability Theory

R. B.  Hamon, “Teaching Environmental Activism and Ecological Hermeneutics,” 66-80

KEYWORDS: Environmental Activism; Ecological hermeneutics; Environmental humanities; Pedagogy

Sarah Rollens, Eric Vanden Eykel, and Meredith J. C. Warren, “Confronting Judeophobia in the Classroom,” 81-106

KEYWORDS: Judeophobia; Anti-Semitism; Pittsburgh; Synagogue

Chris Greenough, “Activism in the Queer Biblical Studies Classroom,” 107-126.

KEYWORDS: Activism; Queer theory; Flipped learning; Methodsplaining; Risk

Robyn Ashworth-Steen & Deborah Kahn-Harris, “‘If not with others, how?’: Creating Rabbinic Activists Through Study,” 127-149.

KEYWORDS: Activism; Feminism; Education; Megillot; Seminary

Jayme R. Reaves, “Reading the Whole Bible with Integrity: Identifying Context, Identity, Community, and Antisemitism in Christian Hermeneutical Practices,” 150-178.

KEYWORDS: Hebrew Bible; Antisemitism; New Testament; Hermeneutics; Critical Pedagogy; Reader-Response Criticism

Gerald O. West & Sithembiso Zwane, “Re-reading 1 Kings 21:1-16 Between Community-based Activism and University-based Pedagogy,” 179-207.

KEYWORDS: Contextual Bible Study; 1 Kings 21; Land; Gender; Unemployment

Tina Shepardson, “Embodied Readers: Teaching about the Earliest Christians in Rural Protestant America,” 208-223.

KEYWORDS: New Testament; Appalachia; Bible belt; Social Justice

David Tombs, “Hidden in Plain Sight: Seeing the Stripping of Jesus as Sexual Violence,” 224-247.

KEYWORDS: Jesus; Sexual Abuse; Crucifixion; Francisco Goya; Susan Sontag

Sarah Nicholson & Zanne Domoney-Lyttle, “Activism in the Classroom: A Case Study on De-Patriarchalising Biblical Studies for Future Generations,” 248-265.

KEYWORDS: Feminism; Bible; Language; Community; Disruptive Activism

Abstract

 

Volume 1 Issue 1

Autumn 2019

Meredith J C Warren, “Editorial Preface,” 1-5.
Caroline Blyth, “Bringing the Apostle Down to Earth: Emily Dickinson Wrestles with Paul,” 6-25.
KEYWORDS: Emily Dickinson, Paul, literary criticism
Chris Greenough, “‘Queer Eye’ in Theology and Biblical Studies: ‘Do you have to be queer to do this?‘” 26-41.
KEYWORDS: heterosexuality, queer, theology, biblical studies, straight, identity
Matthew R. Anderson, “‘Aware-Settler’ Biblical Studies: Breaking Claims of Textual Ownership,” 42-68.
KEYWORDS: aware-Settler, Indigenous, Settler, hermeneutics, biblical scholarship
A. K. M. Adam, “Sensuous Hermeneutics,” 69-94.
KEYWORDS: hermeneutics, interpretation, visual exegesis, information design, comics theory, Magritte, Tansey, differential hermeneutics
Anna Cwikla, “There’s Nothing about Mary: The Insignificance of Mary in the Gospel of Thomas 114,” 95-112.
KEYWORDS: Gospel of Thomas, Mary Magdalene, Eve Sedgwick, feminist criticism
Katie Edwards, “Rape Myths and Gospels Truths: The Bible and Rape Culture,” PAGES.
KEYWORDS:

Abstract

See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies

Open Access Journal: Patristica et Mediævalia

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Patristica et Mediævalia

PATRISTICA ET MEDIÆVALIA tiene el orgullo de ser la primera revista especializada en temas de filosofía medieval de Latinoamérica. Fue fundada en 1975 por María Mercedes Bergadá, dirigida desde el año 1987 hasta el 2018 por Francisco Bertelloni, y actualmente por Claudia D’Amico.

La Sección de Estudios de Filosofía Medieval de la Facultad de Filosofía y Letras de la Universidad de Buenos Aires ha encontrado en esta publicación un medio de comunicación y de intercambio efectivo con la comunidad científica dedicada a la investigación del pensamiento y de la filosofía medievales.

Enfoque y alcance
Patristica et Mediævalia tiene como finalidad publicar trabajos científicos e inéditos producidos por miembros de la comunidad académica tanto local, como regional e internacional.

La revista conserva su nombre fundacional. Con todo, el ámbito temático de las contribuciones que espera recibir en esta etapa no se reduce de ningún modo a autores/as ligados/as exclusivamente al pensamiento cristiano, sino más bien a todos/as aquellos/as relacionados/as con la cultura del Libro –judaísmo, cristianismo e Islam– que florecieron en un amplio arco temporal que se extiende desde la Antigüedad tardía hasta el Renacimiento del cinquecento.

Periodicidad
A partir del volumen 40, Patristica et Mediævalia publica dos números por año (enero-junio y julio-diciembre) reunidos en un único volumen, tanto en su versión digital como impresa.

  •   Vol 38 (2017)
    This volume of Patristica et Mediaevalia (2017) presents a series of studies focused on the reception of Aristotle’s political and ethical thought in Iberian and Latin American scholasticism. The background of these studies is the research project “Reception and Development of Aristotle’s Political Thought in Latin America, 16th-18th Centuries”, supported by the Alexander von Humboldt-Foundation (Germany).
  •   Vol 36 (2015)
    The present volume of Patristica & Mediaevalia has as a central topic philosophical, along with theological and legal, assessments to a particular form of slavery -i.e. Black slavery- regrettably practiced in Latin America, in the period that stretches from the 16th up to the 19th century. Even more specifically, the contributors present studies on authors and works that could be characterized as representing "Second Scholasticism" broadly speaking, which should include some representative thinkers both of Iberian and Latin-American Scholasticism.
1-10 of 42

See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies

 

Texts Added to the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae (TLG®) on September 3, 2020

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 Texts Added to the Thesaurus Linguae Graecae (TLG®) on September 3, 2020

In 1999, the TLG® logo became the first... - Thesaurus Linguae Graecae |  Facebook

September 3, 2020: Our quarterly corpus update with seventy three works from thirty-six authors is done. Additions include Michael Psellus' letters, works by Origen, Eusebius, Theodore Metochites, Euthymius Zigabenus, Bessarion, Caesarius Dapontes, Neophytus Ducas, Nicolaus Sophianus and a number of hagiographical works.

2042 ORIGENES Theol. ()
085 Fragmenta ex commentariis in evangelium Matthaei (in catenis)
2702 Michael PSELLUS Epist., Hagiogr., Phil., Polyhist. et Theol. ()
051 Epistulae
052 Dubia, incerta, excerpta, sententiae, retractationes, et epistulae aliorum auctorum in collectione Pselli preservatae
2738 CHRONOGRAPHIAE ANONYMAE Chronogr. ()
010 Chronographia Anonyma (e cod. Par. gr. 854)
3038 EUTHYMIUS ZIGABENUS Scr. Eccl. ()
008 Commentarius in Pauli epistulam ad Ephesios
009 Commentarius in Pauli epistulam ad Philippenses
010 Commentarius in Pauli epistulam ad Colossenses
011 Commentarius in Pauli epistulam ad Thessalonicenses i
012 Commentarius in Pauli epistulam ad Thessalonicenses ii
013 Commentarius in Pauli epistulam ad Timotheum i
014 Commentarius in Pauli epistulam ad Timotheum ii
015 Commentarius in Pauli epistulam ad Titum
016 Commentarius in Pauli epistulam ad Philemonem
017 Commentarius in Pauli epistulam ad Hebraeos
018 Commentarius in Jacobi catholicam epistulam
019 Commentarius in Petri catholicam epistulam i
020 Commentarius in Petri catholicam epistulam ii
021 Commentarius in Joannis catholicam epistulam i
022 Commentarius in Joannis catholicam epistulam ii
023 Commentarius in Joannis catholicam epistulam iii
024 Commentarius in Judae catholicam epistulam
3115 SYMEON METAPHRASTES Biogr., Hagiogr. et Hist. ()
018 Vita Abramii confessoris (BHG 8)
024 Passio sanctorum Marciani et Martyrii notarii (BHG 1029)
026 Vita Ananiae apostoli (BHG 76)
027 Passio sanctae Anastasiae
028 Passio sancti Anthimi episcopi Nicomediae (BHG 135)
029 Passio sancti Babylae martyris Antiochiae
3191 Theodorus METOCHITES Phil. et Polyhist. ()
021 Orationes
022 Chrysobulli prooemium
3229 BESSARION Rhet. et Theol. ()
023 Laudatio sancti Bessarionis (e cod. Marc. gr. 533) (BHG 2063)
3390 Joannes JEJUNATOR Scr. Eccl. et Theol. ()
001 Libellus Poenitentialis
002 Sermo de poenitentia
003 Sermo de poenitentia, et continentia, et virginitate
4124 EUSEBIUS Scr. Eccl. ()
014 Commentarii in Genesim (fragmenta e catenis)
4490 NICOLAUS CATAPHLORON Rhet. ()
001 Oratio ad praefectum Athenarum (e cod. Escorial. 265 [Y II 10])
4491 Alexius ARISTENUS Theol. ()
001 Scholia in canones apostolorum
002 Scholia in concilia oecumenica et localia
003 Scholia in canones Basilii Magni
4495 BASILIUS Metropolita Neopatrensis Theol. ()
001 Prologus interpretationis sanctorum XII prophetarum
4496 THEODORUS Episcopus Iconensis Hagiogr. ()
001 In martyrium sanctorum Ciryci et Julittae
4497 Eustathius BOILAS Acta et Legal. ()
001 Testamentum (e cod. Par. Coisl. gr. 263)
5123 VITA S. AUXENTII Hagiogr. ()
003 Vita sancti Auxentii Bithyniae
5137 PASSIONES SANCTI JACOBI ZEBEDAEI Hagiogr. ()
002 Acta Jacobi Zebedaei (e cod. Par. gr. 1534)
5193 VITAE SANCTI NIPHONI Hagiogr. ()
001 Vita sancti Niphoni (BHG 1371)
5194 VITAE SANCTI PHILOTHEI Hagiogr. ()
001 Vita sancti Philothei (BHG 1534)
5226 VITAE SANCTAE ANYSIAE Hagiogr. ()
001 Passio sanctae Anysiae
002 Passio sanctae Anysiae (sub auctore Gregorio monacho) (BHG 145)
5227 VITAE SANCTI TRIPHYLII EPISCOPI CYPRII Hagiogr. ()
001 Vita sancti Triphylii (BHG 2462)
5228 VITAE SANCTI BESSARIONIS ANACHORITAE Hagiogr. ()
001 Acoluthia sancti Bessarionis (e cod. Par. gr. 345)
5229 VITAE SANCTORUM MARCIANI ET MARTYRII NOTARII Hagiogr. ()
001 Passio sanctorum Marciani et Martyrii notarii (e cod. Hierosol. Sab.27, saec. xi)
002 Passio longior sanctorum Marciani et Martyrii notarii (e cod. Paris. graec. 1468, saec. xi) (BHG 1028z)
5230 VITAE SANCTAE SIRAE Hagiogr. ()
001 Passio sanctae Sirae (BHG 1637)
5233 VITAE SANCTAE AECATERINAE Hagiogr. ()
001 Passio sanctae Aecaterinae (BHG 30)
002 Passio sanctae Aecaterinae (BHG 30a)
003 Passio sanctae Aecaterinae (BHG 31)
5234 VITAE SANCTI DOMETII PERSAE Hagiogr. ()
001 Vita et passio sancti Dometii Persae (BHG 560)
002 Vita brevior (e cod. Mosquensi) (BHG 561)
5240 VITAE SANCTI AMPHILOCHII EPISCOPI ICONIENSIS Hagiogr. ()
001 Vita sancti Amphilochii episcopi Iconiensis (BHG 73)
5241 VITAE SANCTI AQUILAE APOSTOLI Hagiogr. ()
001 Passio s. Aquilae Apostoli
5242 VITAE SANCTAE ANTHUSAE Hagiogr. ()
001 Passio sanctae Anthusae
5360 ASSISIAE REGNI HIEROSOLYMITANI Jurisprud. et Legal. ()
001 Assisiae (e cod. Par. Suppl. gr. 465)
002 Assisiarum pars altera (e cod. Par. gr. 1390 [Colbert 4723])
5522 SCHOLIA IN CLAUDIUM AELIANUM Schol. ()
001 Scholia in Claudii Aeliani libros de natura animalium
9077 Angelus POLITIANUS Poeta ()
001 Carmina
9501 Caesarius DAPONTES Chronogr. et Poeta ()
002 Κῆπος Χαρίτων
007 Peregrinatio ad Crimaeam
008 Excerpta e geographia historica
009 Fabulae
9503 Neophytus DUCAS Epist., Gramm. et Rhet. ()
001 Epistulae (a. 1818-1835)
003 Epistulae (a. 1839-1844)
9505 Nicolaus SOPHIANUS Gramm. ()
001 Ars grammatica
9507 CHRYSANTHUS PATRIARCHA Scr. Eccl. et Theol. ()
002 Bellum Tartarorum
9518 Joannes MANTHUS Chronogr. ()

 

 

ASOR Archives Finding Aids Online

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 [First posted in AWOL 13 July 2010. Updated 14 October 2020]

The ASOR Archives

 

The ASOR Archives house materials documenting the long history of ASOR’s contributions to archaeology.

The Archives project was originally funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and has also benefited from the generous support of the W. Mark Lanier Theological Library and the David Berg Foundation. The goals of the Archives project are to make ASOR’s records accessible to the public by arranging the materials into discrete collections, describing the content of each collection, and digitizing materials of historical significance.

The ASOR Archives hold over a century of records. This list represents materials that have been or are in the process of being organized and digitized.

Archival Collections By Subject

Administrative Records
Board of Trustees Records

Excavation Records
Dhahr Mirzbaneh Excavation Records
Diban Excavation Records
Khirbet et Tannur Excavation Records
ASOR Excavation Records
Issawiya Tomb Excavation Records
Jerash Excavation Records
Nippur Excavation Photograph Collection
Shechem Excavation Records
Tell el-Kheleifeh Excavation Records

Photograph Collections
American Palestine Exploration Society (A.P.E.S.) Photograph Collection
Glass Plate Negatives Collection
Nelson Glueck Photograph Collection
Nippur Excavation Photograph Collection

Presidential Records
A. Henry Detweiler Papers
Carl Kraeling Papers
G. Ernest Wright Papers

Professional & Personal Papers
Carl Kraeling Papers
Clarence Fisher Papers
Edmund Irwin Gordon Papers
G. Ernest Wright Papers
Nelson Glueck Papers
William Foxwell Albright Papers

Publications
Biblical Archaeologist / Near Eastern Archaeology Collection
ASOR Newsletter Collection
Bulletin of ASOR Collection
Journal of Cuneiform Studies Collection

Schools & Committees
Agency for International Development Collection
American School of Oriental Research in
Jerusalem (AIA Committee) Records
ASOR Jerusalem School Records
Ancient Manuscripts Committee Records
Committee on Archaeological Policy

General Collections
Subject File

 

Coll. 001. American Schools of Oriental Research Newsletter Collection
This collection contains a full run of the ASOR Newsletters from 1939-1995. The newsletters contain information about ASOR projects, events such as annual meetings and conferences, fundraising efforts, grant awards, and administrative announcements. Back issues from 1996 to the present are available online. Collection Inventory

Coll. 002. William Foxwell Albright Papers
This collection contains the materials generated by William F. Albright during his long association with ASOR. The collection spans from 1936-1964 and includes materials from Albright’s time as Director of the American School of Oriental Research in Jerusalem. It also includes a significant amount of correspondence with other archaeologists and ASOR colleagues regarding research, excavations, new archaeological methods, and logistical aspects of publishing ASOR bulletins, journals, scholarly papers and monographs. Collection Inventory

Coll. 003. Ancient Manuscripts Committee Records
The Ancient Manuscripts Committee was originally founded as the Dead Sea Scrolls Committee. The majority of the collection is correspondence regarding the study, publication rights, and preservation of the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the funding of the Committee. The records date from 1963 to 1981. Collection Inventory

Coll. 004. American Palestine Exploration Society Photograph Collection
The Tancrede Dumas Photograph Collection contains photographs of archaeological sites in Palestine and Lebanon. The photographs were taken during the 1875 expedition of the American Palestine Exploration Society. Collection Inventory

Coll. 006. Board of Trustees Records
The Board of Trustees Collection contains board meeting minutes from 1921-1989. Collection Inventory

Coll. 007. Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research Collection
The BASOR Collection contains early volumes of the Bulletin, as well as original photographs, article submissions, and other materials published in the Bulletin. The materials date from 1919-1974. Collection Inventory

Coll. 008. Committee on Archaeological Policy Records
The CAP Records document the committee’s activities, such as providing funding and support to affiliated researchers. This collection has not yet been processed.

Coll. 009. American School of Oriental Research in Jerusalem Records, held at the Archaeological Institute of America
ASOR began as a subcommittee of the AIA, and ASOR’s earliest records are held there. The materials date from 1900 to the early 1920s. This collection is being processed.

Coll. 010. Nelson Glueck Papers
The Nelson Glueck Papers contain the professional correspondence, diaries, and photographs of this eminent biblical archaeologist. Materials in the collection date from the early 1930s to 2008. Glueck’s correspondence and diaries can be viewed in an online exhibit made possible by the David Bern Foundation and the W. Mark Lanier Theological Library.

Coll. 011. A. Henry Detweiler Papers
The A. Henry Detweiler Papers document Detweiler’s years as ASOR president. Collection Inventory

Coll. 012. Carl Kraeling Papers
The Kraeling Papers document Kraeling’s years as ASOR president. The collection primarily contains correspondence with ASOR colleagues and archaeologists. Kraeling supported the continued study of the Dead Sea Scrolls, and encouraged humanitarian awareness for Near Eastern refugees during a turbulent period in the area’s history. The records span from 1947 to 1955. Collection Inventory

Coll. 013. Tell el-Kheleifeh Excavation Records
The Tell el-Kheleifeh Excavation Records document the ASOR excavation directed by Nelson Glueck from 1938 to 1940. The records include level books, artifact registries, excavation diaries, and photographs. Collection Inventory

Coll. 014. Khirbet et-Tannur Excavation Records
The Khirbet et-Tannur Excavation Records document the 1938 excavation of a Nabataean temple. The excavation was directed by Nelson Glueck. The collection includes level books, excavation diaries, artifacts, and photographs.

Coll. 015. Edmund Irwin Gordon Papers
This collection documents the life and career of Edmund Gordon. Gordon was a scholar of Near Eastern languages. He served in WWII as a signal intelligence specialist, and later studied at the ASOR Jerusalem School. The collection spans 1934-1984.

Coll. 016 ASOR Jerusalem School Collection
This collection contains financial documents, ledgers, correspondence, as well as legal materials. All pertain to the administration of the school. The collection also contains artifact drawings and photographs of the many excavations affiliated with ASOR.

Coll. 017 Shechem Excavation Records
This collection contains administrative and financial records, correspondence, site reports, field notes, artifact registries, top plans, pottery drawings, and photographs of the site and artifacts found there. Additionally, the collection includes a manuscript of Shechem: The Biography of a Biblical City by G. Ernest Wright, as well as an operetta about the excavation that was written and performed by participants in the 1962 excavation season.

Coll. 018. G. Ernest Wright Papers
The G. Ernest Wright Papers span from 1957-1972. The collection primarily contains correspondence documenting ASOR administration, the founding of the journal Biblical Archaeologist, Wright’s participation in the Shechem excavation, and his service as visiting archaeological director of Hebrew Union College. Wright was elected ASOR president in 1965, and worked with the organization until his death in 1974.

Coll. 019. Diban Excavation Records
This collection documents the excavation of Diban in Jordan by Frederick V. Winnett from 1950-1965. The collection contains photographs, correspondence, and artifacts registries. Collection Inventory

Coll. 020. Clarence Fisher Papers
This collection primarily documents Fisher’s academic and professional life. The collection contains his exhaustive pottery corpus, writings, architectural and artifact sketches, correspondence, creative writing, and excavation diaries. The bulk of the materials pertain to the analysis of Near Eastern pottery. The materials date from 1859-1957.

Coll. 021. Issawiya Tomb Excavation Records
This collection documents the excavation of a Herodian tomb discovered underneath a field on the hillock of Ras el Jami in Issawiya, a neighborhood of Jerusalem just north of Mount Scopus. The collection contains photographs and journals, and a diary kept by Carl Graesser. The collection spans 1970-1995. Collection Inventory

Coll. 022 Jerash Excavation Records
The collection contains primarily photographs and correspondence documenting different areas of the excavation. Two sketchbooks include detailed architectural drawings and some journal entries. The General file has an excavation report. With this collection is a wood printing plate of the site map. The materials date from 1928 to 1952.

Coll. 023 Biblical Archaeologist / Near Eastern Archaeology Collection
This collection contains Biblical Archaeologist and Near Eastern Archaeology, magazines published by ASOR. The magazines contain scholarly articles, field notes, book reviews, and photographs all pertaining to the art, archaeology and history of the cultures of the ancient Near East. Collection Inventory

Coll. 024 Journal of Cuneiform Studies Collection
This collection contains published journals between 1951 and 2009 with some gaps. Collection Inventory

Coll. 025 Dhahr Mirzbaneh Excavation Records
This collection contains the original manuscript of Paul Lapp’s book, The Dhahr Mirzbaneh Tombs: Three Immediate Bronze Age Cemeteries in Jordan (1966), along with the figures and plates used in its creation. The collection also includes notes and drawings by architect David Voelter.

Coll. 026 Nippur Excavation Photograph Collection
This collection includes over 300 cyanotype photographs depicting artifacts, architecture, and scenes of excavation work from the Nippur Excavations of the University of Pennsylvania covering 1888-1900. In addition to their archaeological interest, the images are notable for their portrayal of the lives of the Arab laborers who worked on the excavation.

Coll. 027 The Nelson Glueck Photograph Collection
This collection contains a photograph index compiled for Glueck’s research. The photographs documents hundreds of sites. Many, but not all of the photographs were taken by Glueck.


Coll. 028 Subject File
This collection contains miscellaneous materials organized alphabetically by subject.

Coll. 029 ASOR Excavation Records
This collection is comprised of grant applications, correspondence, financial records, newsletters, budgets, publications, reports, account books, and photographs from a number of ASOR affiliated excavations.

Coll. 030 ASOR Glass Plate Negative Collection
This collection contains glass plate negative photographs from Beth El, Beth Zur, Tel Beit Mirsim, and Tel el Ful. The photos were taken between 1932 – 1935.

Coll. 032 Agency for International Development Collection
This collection contains information about ASOR’s relationship with the Agency for International Development (AID). The content includes correspondence, financial documents, grant proposals, and reports.




Database of Medieval Nubian Texts

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Database of Medieval Nubian Texts (DBMNT)

http://www.dbmnt.uw.edu.pl/images/menu.jpg 

I am happy and proud to present to you the Database of Medieval Nubian Texts (DBMNT), which is the outcome of roughly ten years of my work on different aspects of literary culture of Christian Nubia. The DBMNT was officially inaugurated in 2011 as an integral part of my book entitled Chronological Systems of Christian Nubia, where different aspects of counting time in the Nubian kingdoms of Nobadia, Makuria, and Alwa between the mid-sixth and fifteenth centuries are treated in detail. At the beginning, the database consisted of 733 records, gathering all Nubian texts in which various chronological phenomena are recorded. However, since the beginning of work, the DBMNT was constructed to include different kinds of written sources from Christian Nubia, not only those containing dates and/or other chronological indicators. For the past four years, I have focused on collecting and entering those sources to produce a major update to the DBMNT. As a result, at present the database contains 2942 records, which cover all possible forms of written expression left by the inhabitants of the Middle Nile Valley in the Middle Ages. Hence, the user will find here written sources of various forms and functions (from important administrative inscriptions and documents, through literary and liturgical manuscripts, private correspondence, elaborate epitaphs and modest tombstones, graffiti left by pious pilgrims on walls of churches, to various symbols scratched on ceramic vessels), executed on all possible kinds of media (stone, papyrus, paper, parchment, leather, pottery, wood, metal, textiles, glass, rocks, and walls of buildings).

The task of gathering all these sources and processing them was not easy and required browsing through an enormous quantity of publications, not infrequently extremely hard to access. As a result, along with texts that were published lege artis (i.e. with a full description, transcription, translation, commentary, and – most ideally – photo and/or tracing), the DBMNT includes also those that were quasi-published (i.e. they have more or less decent transcriptions but no translations and commentaries or vice versa) and those that are classified as unpublished (i.e. they are only mentioned in passing, their content is described without giving a transcription, or they are available only in the form of photographs or tracings/drawings). Of course, the last two cases are the most problematic in terms of metadata (findspot, material, technique of execution, dimensions, colour) and the user will frequently come across empty fields and fields with the note 'not recorded'. These voids will hopefully be filled in, when access to particular objects and/or their documentation is obtained and new publications come out.

Grzegorz Ochała
Department of Papyrology
Institute of Archaeology
University of Warsaw

 

Open Access Books from the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology

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Open Access Books from the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology
The Cotsen Institute of Archaeology Press is the academic publishing division of the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA, a premier research organization dedicated to the creation, dissemination, and conservation of archaeological knowledge and heritage. The Cotsen Institute is also home to both the Interdepartmental Archaeology Program and the UCLA/Getty Master's Program in Archaeological and Ethnographic Conservation. Since 1975, the Cotsen Institute Press (formerly the Publications Unit) has served to preserve cultural heritage through the documentation and publication of scholarly archaeological research. Specializing in producing high-quality academic titles, our press publishes approximately 10 volumes per year in nine series, including a new digital series hosted on eScholarship. Acquisitions are monitored by an Editorial Board composed of distinguished UCLA and external faculty and are accepted based on the results of critical peer review. For more information about our press, please visit our Web site http://www.ioa.ucla.edu/publications/introduction.

Cotsen Digital Archaeology series

Cover page of Archaeology 2.0: New Approaches to Communication and Collaboration

Archaeology 2.0: New Approaches to Communication and Collaboration

(2011)

How is the Web transforming the professional practice of archaeology? And as archaeologists accustomed to dealing with “deep time,” how can we best understand the possibilities and limitations of the Web in meeting the specialized needs of professionals in this field? These are among the many questions posed and addressed in Archaeology 2.0: New Approaches to Communication and Collaboration, edited by Eric Kansa, Sarah Whitcher Kansa, and Ethan Watrall. With contributions from a range of experts in archaeology and technology, this volume is organized around four key topics that illuminate how the revolution in communications technology reverberates across the discipline: approaches to...

  • 1 supplemental PDF
Cover page of The World According to Basketry

The World According to Basketry

(1999)

This book was originally published in 1999 by the Leiden University, Center of Non-Western Studies. This is an unabridged re-publication of the 1999 edition, and the one-hour movie that is an integral part of the book. You can download the movie as mp4 file under the tab “Supporting Material”. At a future date the full integration of text and video (as specified in Appendix C of the book) will be offered through this stable URL as well.

  • 1 supplemental video
Cover page of Who is afraid of basketry

Who is afraid of basketry

(1991)

A guide to recording basketry and cordage for archaeologists and ethnographers

  • 1 supplemental file

Cotsen Institute of Archaeology Press

 

Cover page of Practical archaeology: Field and Laboratory techniques and Archaeological logistics

Practical archaeology: Field and Laboratory techniques and Archaeological logistics

(2020)

All archaeological writing can be placed in two categories: that which reports on or interprets archaeological discoveries and that which proposes the ways and means by which new discoveries can be made or interpreted. Archaeological writing on systems theory, simulation, and method obviously belongs to the second category. Archaeological writing about the ways and means of research should be a topical triumvirate featuring theory, method, and practice. The following papers bear witness to the value of practical considerations within the field. They are useful and instructive because they address common problems from the world of real archaeology and purpose real solutions for them that...

Cover page of Landscape History of Hadramawt: The Roots of Agriculture in Southern Arabia (RASA Project 1998-2008)

Landscape History of Hadramawt: The Roots of Agriculture in Southern Arabia (RASA Project 1998-2008)

(2020)

The rugged highlands of southern Yemen are one of the less archaeologically explored regions of the Near East. This final report of survey and excavations by the Roots of Agriculture in Southern Arabia (RASA) Project addresses the development of food production and human landscapes, topics of enduring interest as scholarly conceptualizations of the Anthropocene take shape. Along with data from Manayzah, site of the earliest dated remains of clearly domesticated animals in Arabia, the volume also documents some of the earliest water management technologies in Arabia, thereby anchoring regional dates for the beginnings of pastoralism and of potential farming...

Cover page of Early Athens: Settlements and Cemeteries in the Submycenaean, Geometric, and Archaic Periods

Early Athens: Settlements and Cemeteries in the Submycenaean, Geometric, and Archaic Periods

(2019)

This volume is one of the most important works on ancient Athens in the last fifty years. The focus is on the early city, from the end of the Bronze Age—ca. 1200 BCE—to the Archaic period, when Athens became the largest city of the Classical period. From a systematic study of all the excavation reports and surveys in central Athens, the author has synthesized a detailed diachronic overview of the city from the Submycenaean period through the Archaic. It is a treasure-trove of information for archaeologists who work in this period. Of great value as well are the detailed maps included, which present features of ancient settlements and cemeteries, the repositories of the human physical...

Cover page of Images in Action: The Southern Andean Iconographic Series

Images in Action: The Southern Andean Iconographic Series

(2018)

Emanating from a colloquium in pre-Columbian art and archaeology held at the University of Chile in Santiago, Images in Action presents interpretations of a large corpus of art and iconography from the Southern and South-Central Andes, bringing together some of the most esteemed scholars in the field. More than thirty authors, all with extensive experience in the Southern Andes, examine artifacts, artworks, textiles, archaeology and architecture to develop creative new insights on the cultural interactions between people in prehistoric western South America. The volume’s nearly 700 images are archived in an online database with metadata, fully referenced in the text, and searchable...

Cover page of Unmasking Ideology in Imperial and Colonial Archaeology: Vocabulary, Symbols, and Legacy

Unmasking Ideology in Imperial and Colonial Archaeology: Vocabulary, Symbols, and Legacy

(2018)

This volume addresses the entanglement between archaeology, imperialism, colonialism, capitalism, and war. Popular sentiment in the West has tended to embrace the adventure rather than ponder the legacy of archaeological explorers. Allegations by imperial powers of “discovering” archaeological sites or “saving” world heritage from neglect or destruction have often provided the pretext for expanding political might. Consequently, Indigenous populations often fell victim to imperialism, while seeing their lands confiscated, artifacts looted, and the ancient remains in their midst commodified. Spanning the globe with case studies from East Asia, Siberia, Australia, North and South America...

Cover page of The History and Archaeology of Jaffa 2

The History and Archaeology of Jaffa 2

(2017)

Since 2007 the Jaffa Cultural Heritage Project, under the direction of Aaron A. Burke and Martin Peilstöcker, has endeavored to bring to light the vast archaeological and historical record of the site of Jaffa, Israel. Continuing the effort begun with The History and Archaeology of Jaffa 1, this volume represents a decade of fieldwork and analysis by the Jaffa Cultural Heritage Project and the publication of several projects begun earlier. It consists of a collection of independent studies and final reports on smaller excavations that do not require individual book-length treatments. The volume’s content is arranged around overviews of archaeological research in Jaffa (Part I), historical and...

Cover page of Life at Home in the Twenty-First Century: 32 Families Open Their Doors

Life at Home in the Twenty-First Century: 32 Families Open Their Doors

(2017)

Life at Home in the Twenty-First Century cross-cuts the ranks of important books on social history, consumerism, contemporary culture, the meaning of material culture, domestic architecture, and household ethnoarchaeology. Far richer in information and more incisive than America at Home (Smolan and Erwitt), this innovative book also moves well beyond Rick Smolan's Day in the Life series. It is a distant cousin of Material World and Hungry Planet in content and style, but represents a blend of rigorous science and photography that none of these titles can claim. The authors are widely published scholars--archaeologists and anthropologists from UCLA--and a world-renowned photographer...

Cover page of The Desert Fayum Reinvestigated

The Desert Fayum Reinvestigated

(2017)

The Neolithic in Egypt is thought to have arrived via diffusion from an origin in southwest Asia. In this volume, the authors advocate an alternative approach to understanding the development of food production in Egypt based on the results of new fieldwork in the Fayum. They present a detailed study of the Fayum archaeological landscape using an expanded version of low-level food production to organize observations concerning paleoenvironment, socioeconomy, settlement, and mobility...

Cover page of Tangatatau Rockshelter: The Evolution of an Eastern Polynesian Socio-Ecosystem

Tangatatau Rockshelter: The Evolution of an Eastern Polynesian Socio-Ecosystem

(2017)

Tangatatau Rockshelter on Mangaia Island (Southern Cook Islands), excavated by a multi-disciplinary team in 1989-1991, produced one of the richest stratigraphic sequences of artifacts, faunal assemblages, and archaeobotanical materials in Eastern Polynesia. More than 70 radiocarbon dates provide a tight chronology from AD 1000 to European contact (ca. 1800). The faunal assemblage provides compelling evidence for dramatic reductions in indigenous bird life following Polynesian colonization, one of the best documented cases for human-induced impacts on island biota. ...

Cover page of Art: Authenticity, Restoration, Forgery 

Art: Authenticity, Restoration, Forgery 

(2016)

This book presents a detailed account of authenticity in the visual arts from the Palaeolithic to the postmodern. The restoration of works of art can alter the perception of authenticity, and may result in the creation of fakes and forgeries. These interactions set the stage for the subject of this book, which initially examines the conservation perspective, then continues with a detailed discussion of notions of authenticity, and the philosophical background.  There is a disputed territory between those who view the present-day cult of authenticity as fundamentally flawed, and those who have analyzed its impact upon different cultural milieus, operating across performative, contested, and fragmented ground...

Cover page of Altera Roma: Art and Empire from Mérida to Mexico

Altera Roma: Art and Empire from Mérida to Mexico

(2016)

Altera Roma explores the confrontation of two cultures—European and Amerindian—and two empires—Spanish and Aztec. In an age of exploration and conquest, Spanish soldiers, missionaries, and merchants brought an array of cultural preconceptions. Their encounter with Aztec civilization coincided with Europe’s rediscovery of classical antiquity, and Tenochtitlán came to be regarded a “second Rome,” altera Roma. Iberia’s past as the Roman province of Hispania served to both guide and critique the Spanish overseas mission. ...

Cover page of A Bronze Age Landscape in the Russian Steppes: The Samara Valley Project 

A Bronze Age Landscape in the Russian Steppes: The Samara Valley Project 

(2016)

The first English-language monograph that describes seasonal and permanent Late Bronze Age settlements in the Russian steppes, this is the final report of the Samara Valley Project, a U.S.-Russian archaeological investigation conducted between 1995 and 2002. It explores the changing organization and subsistence resources of pastoral steppe economies from the Eneolithic (4500 BC) through the Late Bronze Age (1900–1200 BC) across a steppe-and-river valley landscape in the middle Volga region, with particular attention to the role of agriculture during the unusual episode of sedentary, settled pastoralism that spread across the Eurasian steppes with the Srubnaya and Andronovo cultures...

Cover page of The Archaeology of Grotta Scaloria: Ritual in Neolithic Southeast Italy

The Archaeology of Grotta Scaloria: Ritual in Neolithic Southeast Italy

(2016)

Scaloria Cave, Grotta Scaloria, is in Apulia, where the Tavoliere Plain rises to meet the Gargano peninsula. Hundreds of villages were located there during the Neolithic period, the villagi trincerati first identified from aerial photographs taken by the British RAF during WW II. Certainly some of these Neolithic villagers of the Tavoliere visited Scaloria Cave, for refuge from the elements, and for the mysterious rituals held in both the Lower and Upper Chambers. 

Grotta Scaloria was first discovered and explored in 1931, excavated briefly in 1967, and extensively from 1978–80 by a...

Cover page of Icon, Cult, and Context: Sacred Spaces and Objects in the Classical World

Icon, Cult, and Context: Sacred Spaces and Objects in the Classical World

(2016)

This festschrift honors UCLA professor emerita Susan Downey and her meticulous scholarship on religious architecture and imagery in the Roman/Hellenistic world. The iconography of gods and goddesses, the analysis of sacred imagery in the context of ancient cult practices, and the design and decoration of sacred spaces are the main themes of the book.

Professor Downey’s influence shines through in these discussions, which echo her mentorship of several generations of art history and archaeology students, and recognize her scholarly achievements...

Cover page of Vilcabamba and the Archaeology of Inca Resistance

Vilcabamba and the Archaeology of Inca Resistance

(2015)

The sites of Vitcos and Espíritu Pampa are two of the most important Inca cities within the remote Vilcabamba region of Peru. The province has gained notoriety among historians, archaeologists and other students of the Inca, since it was from here that the last independent Incas waged a nearly forty year-long war (AD 1536–1572) against Spanish control of the Andes. Building on three years of excavation and two years of archival work, the authors discuss the events that took place in this area, speaking to the complex relationships that existed between the Europeans and Andeans during the decades that Vilcabamba was the final stronghold of the Inca empire...

Cover page of Rural Archaeology in Early Urban Northern Mesopotamia: Excavations at Tell Al-Raqa'i

Rural Archaeology in Early Urban Northern Mesopotamia: Excavations at Tell Al-Raqa'i

(2015)

This book presents a new perspective on the emergence of urban societies in Mesopotamia, focusing attention on life in a rural village and helping to correct the traditional bias by archaeologists toward the urban and the elite. Reporting on the extensive excavations at Tell al-Raqa’i (early-middle 3rd millennium BC) in upper Mesopotamia/Syria, the authors offer detailed studies on architecture, pottery, animal bones, plant remains, and other varieties of artifacts and ecofacts. These data provide a wealth of information on the nature of life in a small community during the transition to urbanism. Spatial and social organization, household economics, and the significance of enigmatic structures such as...

Cover page of An Archaic Mexican Shellmound and Its Entombed Floors

An Archaic Mexican Shellmound and Its Entombed Floors

(2015)

Tlacuachero is the site of an Archaic-period shellmound located in the wetlands of the outer coast of southwest Mexico. This book presents investigations of several floors that are within the site's shell deposits that formed over a 600-800 year interval during the Archaic period (ca. 8000-2000 BCE), a crucial timespan in Mesoamerican prehistory when people were transitioning from full blown dependency on wild resources to the use of domesticated crops. 

The floors are now deeply buried in an limited area below the summit of the shellmound.  The authors explore what...

Cover page of The Excavation of the Prehistoric Burial Tumulus at Lofkënd, Albania (2-Vol Set)

The Excavation of the Prehistoric Burial Tumulus at Lofkënd, Albania (2-Vol Set)

(2014)

The burial tumulus of Lofkënd lies in one of the richest archaeological areas of Albania (ancient Illyria) home to a number of burial tumuli spanning the Bronze and Iron Ages of later European prehistory. Modern understanding of the pre- and protohistory of Illyria has largely been shaped by the contents of such burial mounds, yet some were robbed long ago, others reused for modern burials, and few were excavated under scientific conditions. What inspired this systematic exploration by UCLA was more than the promise of an unplundered necropolis; it was also the chance to revisit the significance of this tumulus and its fellows for the emergence of urbanism and complexity in ancient...

Cover page of New Insights into the Iron Age Archaeology of Edom, Southern Jordan

New Insights into the Iron Age Archaeology of Edom, Southern Jordan

(2014)

Situated south of the Dead Sea, near the famous Nabataean capital of Petra, the Faynan region in Jordan contains the largest deposits of copper ore in the southern Levant. The Edom Lowlands Regional Archaeology Project (ELRAP) takes an anthropological archaeology approach to the deep-time study of culture change in one of the Old World’s most important locales for studying technological development. Using innovative digital tools for data recording, curation, analyses and dissemination, the researchers focused on ancient mining and metallurgy as the subject of surveys and excavations related to the Iron Age (ca. 1200–500 BCE), when the first local, historical state-level societies appeared in...

Cover page of Archaeology of the Chinese Bronze Age: From Erlitou to Anyang 

Archaeology of the Chinese Bronze Age: From Erlitou to Anyang 

(2014)

Archaeology of the Chinese Bronze Age is a synthesis of recent Chinese archaeological work on the second millennium BCE-the period associated with China’s first dynasties and East Asia’s first “states.” With a focus on early China’s great metropolitan centers in the Central Plains and their hinterlands, this work attempts to contextualize them within their wider zones of interaction from the Yangtze to the edge of the Mongolian steppe, and from the Yellow Sea to the Tibetan plateau and the Gansu corridor. Analyzing the complexity of early Chinese culture history, and the variety and development of its urban formations, Roderick Campbell explores East Asia’s divergent developmental paths and...

Cover page of Formative Lifeways in Central Tlaxcala, Volume 1: Excavations, Ceramics, and Chronology

Formative Lifeways in Central Tlaxcala, Volume 1: Excavations, Ceramics, and Chronology

(2014)

The transition to the Formative in the relatively high-altitude study region of Tlaxcala, Mexico is later than it was in choice regions for early agriculture elsewhere in Mesoamerica. From 900 BCE, however, population growth and sociopolitical development were rapid. A central claim in the research presented here is that a macroregional perspective is essential for understanding the local Formative sequence. In this volume, the data from excavations at three village sites (Amomoloc, Tetel, and Las Mesitas) and one modest regional center (La Laguna) are examined. The ceramic typology is described in detail. An innovative approach to the classification of figurines is presented, and a...

Cover page of Visions of Tiwanaku

Visions of Tiwanaku

(2013)

“What was Tiwanaku?” This question was posed to a select group of scholars that gathered for an intensive two-day conference at the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA. For over half a millennium, the megalithic ruins in the highlands of the Andes mountains have stood as proxy for the desires and ambitions of various empires and political agendas; in the last hundred years, scholars have attempted to answer this question by interpreting the shattered remains from a distant preliterate past. The conference pooled the decades of experience of a dozen leading scholars together with the recent field data of junior scholars (published separately in Volumes 2 and 3 of Advances in Titicaca...

Cover page of Advances in Titicaca Basin Archaeology-2 

Advances in Titicaca Basin Archaeology-2 

(2013)

This volume, the second in a series of studies on the archaeology of the Titicaca Basin, serves as an excellent springboard for broader discussions of the roles of ritual, authority, coercion, and the intensification of resources and trade for the development of archaic states worldwide. Over the last hundred years, scholars have painstakingly pieced together fragments of the incredible cultural history of the Titicaca Basin, an area that encompasses over 50,000 square kilometers, achieving a basic understanding of settlement patterns and chronology. While large-scale surveys need to continue and areas will need to be revisited to further refine chronologies and knowledge of site-formation processes...

Cover page of Empires and Diversity: On the Crossroads of Archaeology, Anthropology, and History

Empires and Diversity: On the Crossroads of Archaeology, Anthropology, and History

(2013)

For more than four thousand years, empires have been geographically the largest polities on Earth, shaping in many respects the human past and present in different epochsand on different continents. 

Covering the time span from the second millennium BCE to the sixteenth century CE, and geographic areas from China to South America, the case studies included in this volume demonstrate the necessity to combine perspectives from the longue durée and global comparativism with Han Dynasty Chinese, Inka, and Mughal empiresthe theory of agency and...

Cover page of Light and Shadow: Isolation and Interaction in the Shala Valley of Northern Albania

Light and Shadow: Isolation and Interaction in the Shala Valley of Northern Albania

(2013)

There are few places in Europe as remote as the Shala Valley of northern Albania. The inhabitants appear lost in time, cut off from the outside world, a people apart. But this careful interdisciplinary study of their past and way of life tells a very different tale, overturning much of what we thought we knew about Shala and “persistent” peoples everywhere.

The residents of this mountain tribe spent centuries inside the bounds of the Ottoman Empire, yet they retained not only their Catholicism, but also their political autonomy, forming a flexible, resilient society. Employing survey...

Cover page of The Dead Tell Tales

The Dead Tell Tales

(2013)

Honoring Jane Buikstra’s pioneering work in the development of archaeobiological research, the essays in this volume stem from a symposium held at an annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Buikstra’s redefinition of the term “bioarchaeology” to focus specifically on human skeletal data in historical and anthropological contexts, and the impact of her mentorship on developing scholars in the field, are acknowledged and celebrated by the wide-ranging contributions in The Dead Tell Tales...

Cover page of Classic Maya Political Ecology: Resource Management, Class Histories, and Political Change in Northwestern Belize 

Classic Maya Political Ecology: Resource Management, Class Histories, and Political Change in Northwestern Belize 

(2013)

The Classic Maya of the Central Lowlands crafted one of the ancient world’s great civilizations in what is today Belize, northern Guatemala, and Yucatan, Mexico. Although the Maya have long been known for their artistic and architectural achievements, the economic and agricultural base of this society has received far less attention. Over the past couple of decades, archaeologists have begun to understand how Maya householders reliably farmed this harsh, fragile, and yet highly productive environment for two thousand years. A new view emerges of how regional polities prospered in the face of population increase, political turmoil, and environmental and climatic change...

Cover page of The Stones of Tiahuanaco

The Stones of Tiahuanaco

(2013)

The remains of the artful gateways, platforms, walls, and sculpture at Tiahuanaco, an important Middle Horizon site at the southern end of Lake Titicaca in Bolivia, have for centuries sparked what has seemed like unanswerable questions about how they were made. The masons’ highly sophisticated knowledge of mathematics, geometry, and stonecraft is evident in the tight joints and perfectly sharp, right angles of these fine examples of Andean cut-stone architecture. The Inca prized the precise stone masonry of this important site, which is considered by many scholars to be the precursor of the stonebuilding traditions of their civilization, which flourished four hundred years after the decline of...

Cover page of Last House on the Hill: BACH Area Reports from Çatalhöyük, Turkey

Last House on the Hill: BACH Area Reports from Çatalhöyük, Turkey

(2012)

Occupied from around 7500 BC to 5700 BC, the large Neolithic and Chalcolithic settlement of Çatalhöyük in Anatolia is composed entirely of domestic buildings; no public buildings have been identified. First excavated in the early 1960s, the site was left untouched until 1993. During the summers of 1997–2003 a team from the University of California at Berkeley (the BACH team) excavated an area at the northern end of the East Mound of Çatalhöyük. The houses there date predominantly to the late Aceramic and early Ceramic Neolithic, around 7000 BC. Last House on the Hill is the final report of the BACH excavations. This volume comprises both interpretive chapters and empirical data from the...

Cover page of The History of the Peoples of the Eastern Desert

The History of the Peoples of the Eastern Desert

(2012)

The last quarter century has seen extensive research on the ports of the Red Sea coast of Egypt, the road systems connecting them to the Nile, and the mines and quarries in the region. Missing has been a systematic study of the peoples of the Eastern Desert—the area between the Red Sea and the Nile Valley—in whose territories these ports, roads, mines, and quarries were located.The historical overview of the Eastern Desert in the shape of a roughly chronological narrative presented in this book fills that gap...

Cover page of The Construction of Value in the Ancient World

The Construction of Value in the Ancient World

(2012)

Scholars from Aristotle to Marx and beyond have been fascinated by the question of what constitutes value. The Construction of Value in the Ancient World makes a significant contribution to this ongoing inquiry, bringing together in one comprehensive volume the perspectives of leading anthropologists, archaeologists, historians, linguists, philologists, and sociologists on how value was created, defined, and expressed in a number of ancient societies around the world. Based on the basic premise that value is a social construct defined by the cultural context in which it is situated, the volume explores four overarching but closely interrelated themes: place value, body value, object value...

Cover page of Lake Titicaca: Legend, Myth and Science

Lake Titicaca: Legend, Myth and Science

(2012)

Lake Titicaca and the vast region surrounding this deep body of water contain mysteries that we are just beginning to unravel. The area surrounding the world’s highest navigable lake was home to some of the greatest civilizations in the ancient world. These civilizations were created by the ancestors of the Aymara and Quechua peoples who continue to live and work in Peru and Bolivia along the shores of this ancient body of water. This lavishly illustrated book provides a state-of-the-art description and explanation of the great cultures that inhabited this land from the first migrants ten millennia ago to the people who thrive here today. We will also discover the world of myth and legend that has grown...

Cover page of Crucible of Pueblos: The Early Pueblo Period in the Northern Southwest 

Crucible of Pueblos: The Early Pueblo Period in the Northern Southwest 

(2012)

Archaeologists are increasingly recognizing the early Pueblo period as a major social and demographic transition in Southwest history. In Crucible of Pueblos: The Early Pueblo Period in the Northern Southwest, Richard Wilshusen, Gregson Schachner and James Allison present the first comprehensive summary of population growth and migration, the materialization of early villages, cultural diversity, relations of social power, and the emergence of early great houses during the early Pueblo period. Six chapters address these developments in the major regions of the northern Southwest and four synthetic chapters then examine early Pueblo material culture to explore social identity, power...

Cover page of Chotuna and Chornancap: Excavating an Ancient Peruvian Legend

Chotuna and Chornancap: Excavating an Ancient Peruvian Legend

(2012)

Christopher Donnan's Chotuna and Chornancap: Excavating an Ancient Peruvian Legend, explores one of the most intriguing oral histories passed down among ancient Peruvians: the legend of Naymlap, the founder of a dynasty that ruled the Lambayeque Valley of northern Peru centuries before European contact. Naymlap is said to have built his palace at a place that many now consider to be the archaeological sites of Chotuna and Chornancap. In an effort to test the validity of the Naymlap legend, Donnan directed extensive archaeological excavations at Chotuna and Chornancap--completing plans of the monumental architecture, mapping and excavating most of the major structures, and...

Cover page of Exploring Methods of Faunal Analysis: Insights from California Archaeology 

Exploring Methods of Faunal Analysis: Insights from California Archaeology 

(2012)

How does the practice of archaeology benefit from faunal analysis? Michael Glassow and Terry Joslin's Exploring Methods of Faunal Analysis: Insights from California Archaeology addresses this question. Contributors to this volume demonstrate how faunal remains can be used to elucidate subsistence, settlement, technological systems, economic exchange, social organization, adaptation to variability in resource distribution and abundance, and the impacts of historic land use. The sheer prevalence of faunal remains in California archaeological sites means that most archaeologists working in the state inevitably must give these resources their close attention-and yet methodological...

Cover page of Archaeology 2.0: New Approaches to Communication and Collaboration

Archaeology 2.0: New Approaches to Communication and Collaboration

(2011)

How is the Web transforming the professional practice of archaeology? And as archaeologists accustomed to dealing with “deep time,” how can we best understand the possibilities and limitations of the Web in meeting the specialized needs of professionals in this field? These are among the many questions posed and addressed in Archaeology 2.0: New Approaches to Communication and Collaboration, edited by Eric Kansa, Sarah Whitcher Kansa, and Ethan Watrall. With contributions from a range of experts in archaeology and technology, this volume is organized around four key topics that illuminate how the revolution in communications technology reverberates across the discipline: approaches to...

Cover page of An Investigation into Early Desert Pastoralism: Excavations at the Camel Site, Negev

An Investigation into Early Desert Pastoralism: Excavations at the Camel Site, Negev

(2011)

Negev focuses on two primary purposes, one theoretical/methodological and the second substantive. Briefly stated, the book comprises a case study of excavations at an early (ca. 2800 B.C.) pastoral site in the Negev, providing detailed analyses and a synthetic overview of a seasonal encampment from this early period in the evolution of desert pastoral societies. It thus both demonstrates the feasibility of an archaeology of early mobile pastoralism and grapples with the basic anthropological and methodological issues surrounding the subject. Substantively, both the architectural and material culture assemblages uncovered constitute the first detailed analysis of this early desert culture and include...

Cover page of The History and Archaeology of Jaffa 1

The History and Archaeology of Jaffa 1

(2011)

In 2007 the Jaffa Cultural Heritage Project (JCHP) was established as a joint research endeavor of the Israel Antiquities Authority and the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at the University of California, Los Angeles. Among the project’s diverse aims is the publication of numerous excavations conducted in Jaffa since 1948 under the auspices of various governmental and research institutions such as the Israel Department of Antiquities and Museums and its successor, the Israel Antiquities Authority, as well as the Jaffa Cultural Heritage Project. This, the first volume in the Jaffa Cultural Heritage Project series, lays the groundwork for this initiative. Part I provides the historical, economic, and legal...

Cover page of Information and Its Role in Hunter-Gatherer Bands

Information and Its Role in Hunter-Gatherer Bands

(2011)

Information and Its Role in Hunter-Gatherer Bands explores the question of how information, broadly conceived, is acquired, stored, circulated, and utilized in small-scale hunter-gatherer societies, or bands. Given the nature of this question, the volume brings together a group of scholars from multiple disciplines, including archaeology, ethnography, linguistics, and evolutionary ecology. Each of these specialties deals with the question of information in different ways and with different sets of data given different primacy. The fundamental goal of the volume is to bridge disciplines and subdisciplines, open discussion, and see if some common ground-either theoretical perspectives, general principles...

Cover page of The Chanka: Archaeological Research in Andahuaylas (Apurimac), Peru

The Chanka: Archaeological Research in Andahuaylas (Apurimac), Peru

(2010)

In AD 1438 a battle took place outside the city of Cuzco that changed the course of South American history. The Chanka, a powerful ethnic group from the Andahuaylas region, had begun an aggressive program of expansion. Conquering a host of smaller polities, their army had advanced well inside the territory of their traditional rival, the Inca. 

In a series of unusual maneuvers, the Inca defeated the invading Chanka forces and became the most powerful people in the Andes. Many scholars believe that the defeat of the Chanka represents a defining moment in the history of...

Cover page of Settlement and Subsistence in Early Formative Soconusco: El Varal and the Problem of Inter-Site Assemblage Variation

Settlement and Subsistence in Early Formative Soconusco: El Varal and the Problem of Inter-Site Assemblage Variation

(2010)

The Soconusco region, a narrow strip of the Pacific coast of Mexico and Guatemala, is the location of some of the earliest pottery-using villages of ancient Mesoamerica. Mobile early inhabitants of the area harvested marsh clams in the estuaries, leaving behind vast mounds of shell. With the introduction of pottery and the establishment of permanent villages (from 1900 B.C.), use of the resource-rich estuary changed. The archaeological manifestation of that new estuary adaptation is a dramatic pattern of inter-site variability in pottery vessel forms. Vessels at sites within the estuary were about seventy percent neckless jars -- "tecomates" -- while vessels at contemporaneous sites a few...

Cover page of Gallinazo: An Early Cultural Tradition on the Peruvian North Coast

Gallinazo: An Early Cultural Tradition on the Peruvian North Coast

(2009)

Over the last decades, considerable effort has been directed towards the study of early complex societies of northern Peru, and in recent years archaeologists have expressed a strong interest in the art and archaeology of the Moche, Lambayeque and Chimú societies. Yet, comparatively little attention has been paid to the earlier cultural foundations of North Coast civilization: the Gallinazo. In the recent years, however, the work of a number of North Coast specialists brought about a large quantity of data on the Gallinazo occupation of the coast, but a coherent framework for studying this culture had yet to be defined. A round table, which gathered some thirty scholars from Europe and North and...

Cover page of Blood and Beauty: Organized Violence in the Art and Archaeology of Mesoamerica and Central America

Blood and Beauty: Organized Violence in the Art and Archaeology of Mesoamerica and Central America

(2009)

Warfare, ritual human sacrifice, and the rubber ballgame are the traditional practices through which scholars have most often examined organized violence in the artistic and material records of ancient Mesoamerica and Central America.

This volume expands them to include such activities as gladiatorial-like boxing combats, investiture rites, trophy-head taking and display, dark shamanism, and the subjective pain inherent in acts of violence. Each author examines organized violence as a set of practices grounded in cultural understandings, even when the violence threatens the...

Cover page of Andean Civilization: A Tribute to Michael E. Moseley 

Andean Civilization: A Tribute to Michael E. Moseley 

(2009)

This volume brings together exciting new field data by more than two dozen Andean scholars who came together to honor their friend, colleague, and mentor, Michael E. Moseley. These new studies cover the enormous temporal span of Moseley’s own work from the Preceramic era to the Tiwanaku and Moche states to the Inka empire. And, like Moseley’s own studies—from Maritime Foundations of Andean Civilization to Chan Chan: The Desert City to Cerro Bául’s brewery—these new studies involve settlements from all over the Andes—from the far northern highlands to the far southern coast. An invaluable addition to any Andeanist’s library, the papers in this book demonstrate the enormous breadth...

Cover page of The South American Camelids: An Expanded and Corrected Edition

The South American Camelids: An Expanded and Corrected Edition

(2009)

One of the most significant differences between the New World’s major areas of high culture is that Mesoamerica had no beasts of burden and wool, while the Andes had both. Four members of the camelid family—wild guanacos and vicuñas, and domestic llamas and alpacas—were native to the Andes. South American peoples relied on these animals for meat and wool, and as beasts of burden to transport goods all over the Andes.

In this book, Duccio Bonavia tackles major questions about these camelids, from their domestication to their...

Cover page of Pompeian Households: An Analysis of Material Culture 

Pompeian Households: An Analysis of Material Culture 

(2008)

Studies of Pompeian material culture have traditionally been dominated by art historical approaches, but recently there has been a renewed and burgeoning interest in Pompeian houses for studies of Roman domestic behavior. 

This book is concerned with contextualized Pompeian household artifacts and their role in deepening understanding of household behavior at Pompeii. It consists of a study of the contents of thirty so-called atrium houses in Pompeii to investigate the spatial distribution of household activities, both within each architectural room type and across the...

Cover page of The Archaeology of Mobility: Old World and New World Nomadism

The Archaeology of Mobility: Old World and New World Nomadism

(2008)

A majority of laymen, politicians and scholars consciously or subconsciously understand settled living as the highest rung on the evolutionary ladder. Accounts of people surviving and even thriving in peripheral areas are often instrumental to construct and maintain the dichotomy between 'the desert and the sown.' It is sometimes stated that mobile peoples obtain their material culture from neighboring settled populations, rather than produce their own, and that they do not leave recognizable archaeological traces apart from 'ephemeral campsites.' From the 24 chapters in this volume, however, it is clear that there is indeed an 'archaeology of mobility.'...

Cover page of Excavations at Cerro Azul, Peru: The Architecture and Pottery

Excavations at Cerro Azul, Peru: The Architecture and Pottery

(2008)

During the Late Intermediate period (AD 1100-1470), the lower Cañete Valley of Peru was controlled by the walled Kingdom of Huarco. While inland sites produced irrigated crops, the seaside community of Cerro Azul, 130 km south of Lima, produced fish for the rest of the kingdom.

Cerro Azul's noble families lived in large, multipurpose compounds with tapia walls. Their pottery had its strongest ties with valleys to the south, such as Chincha and Ica. During the course of excavation, the University of Michigan Project...

Cover page of Chavín: Art, Architecture, and Culture 

Chavín: Art, Architecture, and Culture 

(2008)

This book is the first in more than a decade to provide new information on the Chavín phenomenon of ancient Peru. Thought by some to be the "Mother Culture" of ancient Peruvian cultures, Chavín is remarkable for its baroque, sophisticated art style in a variety of media, including finely carved stone monuments, beautifully formed pottery, and magnificent and complex metallurgy. 

The textiles from Chavín, both iconographically and structurally innovative, form the foundation for the later Andean...

Cover page of Rethinking Mycenaean Palaces II: Revised and Expanded Second Edition

Rethinking Mycenaean Palaces II: Revised and Expanded Second Edition

(2007)

This revised and expanded edition of the classic 1999 edited book includes all the chapters from the original volume plus a new, updated, introduction and several new chapters. The current book is an up-to-date review of research into Mycenaean palatial systems with chapters by archaeologists and Linear B specialists that will be useful to scholars, instructors, and advanced students.

This book aims to define more accurately the term “palace” in light of both recent archaeological research in the...

Cover page of The Archaeology of Ritual 

The Archaeology of Ritual 

(2007)

This book is the fruit of the third Cotsen Advanced Seminar conducted at the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA. A wide spectrum of scholars, historians, art historians, anthropologists, students of performance and of religion, archaeologists, cognitive scientists, and linguists were all asked to think and comment on how ritual can be traced in archaeology and on possible directions for ritual research in the discipline. The outcome is a collection of papers that is thought provoking, often controversial, but always of extremely high quality.

Cover page of Machu Picchu: Exploring an Ancient Sacred Center

Machu Picchu: Exploring an Ancient Sacred Center

(2007)

Machu Picchu, voted one of the New Wonders of the World, is one of the world’s most famous archaeological sites, yet it remains a mystery. Even the most basic questions are still unanswered: What was its meaning and why was it built in such a difficult location? Renowned explorer Johan Reinhard attempts to answer such elusive questions from the perspectives of sacred landscape and archaeoastronomy.

Using information gathered from historical, archaeological, and ethnographical sources, Reinhard demonstrates how...

Cover page of Berenike 1999/2000

Berenike 1999/2000

(2007)

Excavations at Berenike, a Greco-Roman harbor on the Egyptian Red Sea coast, have provided extensive evidence for trade with India, South-Arabia and sub-Saharan Africa. 

The results of the 1999 and 2000 excavations by the joint mission of the University of Delaware, Leiden University and UCLA, have been published in a comprehensive report, with specialists’ analyses of different object groups and an overview of evidence for the trade route from the Indian perspective. The book is lavishly illustrated with photographs...

Cover page of Archaeology and Historical Ecology of Late Holocene San Miguel Island

Archaeology and Historical Ecology of Late Holocene San Miguel Island

(2007)

California’s northern Channel Islands have one of the longest and best-preserved archaeological records in the Americas, spanning some 13,000 calendar years. When European explorers first traveled to the area, these islands were inhabited by the Chumash, some of the most populous and culturally complex hunter-gatherers known.

Chumash society was characterized by hereditary leaders, sophisticated exchange networks and interaction spheres, and diverse maritime economies. Focusing on the archaeology of five sites dated to the last 3,000 years, this book...

Cover page of Kasapata and the Archaic Period of the Cuzco Valley

Kasapata and the Archaic Period of the Cuzco Valley

(2007)

Although the Cuzco Valley of Peru is renowned for being the heartland of the Incas, little is known concerning its pre-Inca inhabitants. Until recently it was widely believed that the first inhabitants of the Cuzco Valley were farmers who lived in scattered villages along the valley floor (ca. 1000 BC) and that there were no Archaic Period remains in the region. This perspective was challenged during a systematic survey of the valley, when numerous preceramic sites were found. Additional information came from excavations at the site of Kasapata, the largest preceramic site identified during the survey. It is now clear that the Cuzco Valley was inhabited, like many other regions of the Andes, soon after...

Cover page of Settlement and Society: Essays Dedicated to Robert McCormick Adams

Settlement and Society: Essays Dedicated to Robert McCormick Adams

(2007)

This volume of essays dedicated to Robert McCormick Adams reflects both the breadth of his research and the select themes upon which he focused his attention. These essays written by his students and disciples focus on issues in Near Eastern archaeology but range as far afield as the Indus Valley and Mesoamerica. They are also concentrate on aspects of early complex society, but some refer back to the late Neolithic and others forward to Islamic times. The key foci of Adams’ work are reflected in this collection: ecology, frontiers, urbanism, trade and technology are all explored. Yet in spite of the breadth of the scope of this volume, the various intellectual threads pioneered by Adams serve to tie the...

Cover page of Chinese Society in the Age of Confucius (1000-250 BC)

Chinese Society in the Age of Confucius (1000-250 BC)

(2006)

The Late Bronze Age (ca. 1000-250 BC) was a crucial period during which the Chinese Classics came into being and famous thinkers such as Confucius (ca. 551-479 BC) laid the intellectual foundations of traditional Chinese civilization. Complementing and often challenging the surviving writings, Lothar von Falkenhausen develops a self-consciously archaeological perspective on the social conditions in this time. He analyzes clan and lineage organization, social stratification, gender and ethnic differences, as well as social change over time. Falkenhausen not only presents new data, but also thinks about these data in new ways, emphasizing the nexus between the social order and ritual...

Cover page of Roman Foodprints at Berenike: Archaeobotanical Evidence of Subsistence and Trade in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

Roman Foodprints at Berenike: Archaeobotanical Evidence of Subsistence and Trade in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

(2006)

During the Graeco-Roman period, Berenike served as a gateway to the outside world together with Myos Hormos. Commodities were imported from Africa south of the Sahara, Arabia, and India into the Greek and Roman Empire, the importance of both harbors evidenced by several contemporary sources. Between 1994 and 2002, eight excavation seasons were conducted at Berenike by the University of Delaware and Leiden University, the Netherlands. This book presents the results of the archaeobotanical research of the Roman deposits. It is shown that the study of a transit port such as Berenike, located at the southeastern fringe of the Roman Empire, is highly effective in producing new...

Cover page of Agricultural Strategies 

Agricultural Strategies 

(2006)

This volume brings together a diverse set of new studies--archaeological, ethnohistoric, and ethnographic—that focus on agricultural intensification and hydraulic systems around the world. Fifteen chapters—written by many of the world's leading experts—combine extensive regional overviews of agricultural histories with in-depth case studies. In this volume are chapters on agriculture in the Middle East, South Asia, Europe, Oceania, Mesoamerica, and South America. A wide range of theoretical perspectives and approaches are used to provide a framework for agricultural land-use and water management in a variety of cultural and historical contexts. This book covers the co-evolutionary relationships...

Cover page of Us and Them: Archaeology and Ethnicity in the Andes

Us and Them: Archaeology and Ethnicity in the Andes

(2005)

This volume brings together a corpus of scholars whose work collectively represents a significant advancement in the study of prehistoric ethnicity in the Andean region. The assembled research represents an outstanding collection of theoretical and methodological approaches, and conveys recent discoveries in several subfields of prehistoric Andean anthropology, including spatial archaeology, mortuary archaeology, textile studies, ceramic analysis, and biological anthropology. Many of the authors in this volume apply novel research techniques, while others wield more established approaches in original ways. Although the research presented in this volume has occurred in the Andean region, many...

Cover page of Advances in Titicaca Basin Archaeology-1

Advances in Titicaca Basin Archaeology-1

(2005)

Advances in Titicaca Basin Archaeology-I is the first in a series of edited volumes that reports on recent research in the south central Andes. Volume I contains 18 chapters that cover the entire range of human settlement in the region, from the Early Archaic to the early Colonial Period. This book contains both short research reports as well as longer synthetic essays on work conducted over the last decade. It will be a critical resource for scholars working in the central Andes and adjacent areas.

Cover page of Plain of Phaistos: Cycles of Social Complexity in the Mesara Region of Crete

Plain of Phaistos: Cycles of Social Complexity in the Mesara Region of Crete

(2005)

The volume presents the results on an interdisciplinary regional field project (1984 - 1987) carried out on the island Of Crete. This volume traces the changing patterns of settlement and cycles of social complexity from the Late Neolithic period to the present day within the heartland of the state of Phaistos. The authors and contributors publish geological, archaeological, environmental, botanical, historical and ethnographic studies that establish the regional identity of the Western Mesara. Using a combination of empirical, processual and post-processual theoretical approaches, the volume investigates a central problem - how and why did the Bronze Age and Classical states arise at Phaistos?

Cover page of Foundations of Chumash Complexity

Foundations of Chumash Complexity

(2005)

This volume highlights the latest research on the foundations of sociopolitical complexity in coastal California. The populous maritime societies of southern California, particularly the groups known collectively as the Chumash, have gone largely unrecognized as prototypical complex hunter-gatherers, only recently beginning to emerge from the shadow of their more celebrated counterparts on the Northwest Coast of North America. While Northwest cultures are renowned for such complex institutions as ceremonial potlatches, slavery, cedar plank-house villages, and rich artistic traditions, the Chumash are increasingly recognized as complex hunter-gatherers with a different set of organizational...

Cover page of Maya Zooarchaeology: New Directions in Method and Theory

Maya Zooarchaeology: New Directions in Method and Theory

(2004)

A comprehensive work, combining traditional zooarchaeological reports and various state-of-the-art summaries of methods and theoretical perspectives. This combination of detailed discussions of basic zooarchaeological data with reviews of important themes in Maya zooarchaeology emphasizes the central issues that guide our research from basic data collection through final comparative interpretation. The chapters emphasize the newest developments in technical methods, the most recent trends in the analysis of “social zooarchaeology,” and the broadening perspectives provided by a new geographic range of investigations. The main focus of the volume remains on fostering cooperation among...

Cover page of Archaeological Research on the Islands of the Sun and Moon, Lake Titicaca, Bolivia: Final Results from the Proyecto Tiksi Kjarka

Archaeological Research on the Islands of the Sun and Moon, Lake Titicaca, Bolivia: Final Results from the Proyecto Tiksi Kjarka

(2004)

Beginning in 1994, the Proyecto Tiksi Kjarka conducted a complete survey of the Islands of the Sun and Moon in southern Lake Titicaca, along with test excavations of important Inca, Tiwanaku, and pre-Tiwanaku sites. This book provides the final results of this work on one of the most important locations in the circum-Titicaca Basin, with detailed survey and excavation data indispensable for Andeanists and other scholars interested in the development of complex political, economic, and ritual systems in prehistory.

Cover page of Perspectives on Ancient Maya Rural Complexity

Perspectives on Ancient Maya Rural Complexity

(2003)

Settlement archaeology in the Maya area has focused much of its attention on the polar extremes of the settlement continuum. As a result of this urban/rural bias, a whole range of complex rural settlements remain under-explored. The chapters in this volume highlight the variable quality of these "middle level settlements".

Cover page of Prehistoric Sitagroi: Exavations in Northeast Greece, 1968-1970 Volume 2: The Final Report

Prehistoric Sitagroi: Exavations in Northeast Greece, 1968-1970 Volume 2: The Final Report

(2003)

Volume 2 presents the concluding research on Sitagroi, a prehistoric settlement mound in northeastern Greece, excavated between 1968 and 1970. This volume offers a detailed report on the plant remains along with a full treatment of craft and technology: artifacts of adornment; tools of bone and flaked stone; artifacts and tools of bone and ground and polished stone (and petrology); tools of the spinner, weaver and mat maker; pottery technology; metallurgy; and special clay finds such as seals, miniatures, and utensils. This rich presentation offers unparalleled insights into the life of the prehistoric inhabitants of the area. Sitagroi now becomes one of the most comprehensively published sites from...

Cover page of Theory and Practice in Mediterranean Archaeology: Old World and New World Perspectives

Theory and Practice in Mediterranean Archaeology: Old World and New World Perspectives

(2003)

Theory and Practice in Mediterranean Archaeology: Old World and New World Perspectives brings together leading scholars from the Old World and the Americas to discuss some of the most pressing issues facing archaeology today. These topics include archaeology and text, the future of large-scale archaeological fieldwork at individual sites, interpretation and preservation of archaeological sites and landscapes, past trajectories and new approaches to regional survey, and debates surrounding landscape and settlement archaeology. Essays by Old World archaeologists provide an overview of these themes, as well as a history of research over the last hundred years. These scholars...

Cover page of Yeki bud, yeki nabud: Essays on the Archaeoogy of Iran in Honor of William M. Sumner

Yeki bud, yeki nabud: Essays on the Archaeoogy of Iran in Honor of William M. Sumner

(2003)

This volume is a collection of essays by colleagues, friends, and students of William M. Sumner in appreciation of his outstanding contribution to Iranian archaeology, especially to our archaeological knowledge of Fars, a center of Iranian civilization.

Cover page of Pathways to Prismatic Blades: A Study in Mesoamerican Obsidian Core-Blade Technology

Pathways to Prismatic Blades: A Study in Mesoamerican Obsidian Core-Blade Technology

(2002)

The obsidian prismatic blade is one of the sharpest cutting implements ever produced in the prehistoric world. This volume explores the social and economic processes involved in its manufacture in ancient Mesoamerica. Contributors examine the variation in the way obsidian prismatic blades were manufactured across Mesoamerica and the causes behind this variation. The volume contributes to a broader understanding of prehistoric stone tool production and craft specialization in the ancient world.

Cover page of Domestic Ritual in Ancient Mesoamerica

Domestic Ritual in Ancient Mesoamerica

(2002)

Although the concepts and patterns of ritual varied through time in relation to general sociopolitical transformations and local historical circumstances in ancient Mesoamerica, most archaeologists would agree that certain underlying themes and structures modeled the ritual phenomena of this complex culture area. By focusing on ritual expression at the household level, this volume seeks to compare the manifestations of domestic ritual across time and space in both the cores and peripheries, in the cities and in the villages. The authors explore the ways in which cosmological principles and concepts of the sacred were used in the construction of ritual space and practice, how local landscapes...

Cover page of Catalysts to Complexity

Catalysts to Complexity

(2002)

When the Spanish colonized it in AD 1769, the California Coast was inhabited by speakers of no fewer than 16 distinct languages and an untold number of small, autonomous Native communities. These societies all survived by foraging, and ethnohistoric records show a wide range of adaptations emphasizing a host of different marine and terrestrial foods. Many groups exhibited signs of cultural complexity including sedentism, high population density, permanent social inequality, and sophisticated maritime technologies. The ethnographic era was preceded by an archaeological past that extends back to the terminal Pleistocene. Essays in this volume explore the last three and one half millennia...

Cover page of Ceramics of Postclassic Cholula, Mexico: Typology and Seriation of Pottery from the UA-1 Domestic Compound

Ceramics of Postclassic Cholula, Mexico: Typology and Seriation of Pottery from the UA-1 Domestic Compound

(2001)

As the center for the religious cult of Quetzalcoatl, Cholula played a prominent role in shaping events of central Mexico’s Postclassic period. Yet confusion over historical events in Cholula itself have limited its place in recent archaeological considerations of Mesoamerica. Since ceramic sequences are the backbone of archaeological chronologies, this confusion ultimately relates to problems in previous attempts to order archaeological time with ceramics. This book provides an innovative new classification of Cholula ceramics, based on artifact assemblages from primary depositional contexts recovered from the UA-1 excavations. A detailed and well-illustrated description of ceramic types is provided...

Cover page of Prehistory of Agriculture: New Experimental and Ethnographic Approaches

Prehistory of Agriculture: New Experimental and Ethnographic Approaches

(1999)

The twenty-eight contributors to this book show how experimental and ethnographic approaches are being used to shed new light on the process of domestication, and harvesting techniques, tools and technology in the period just before and just after the appearance of agriculture. The book takes an explicitly comparative approach, with chapters on SW Asia, Europe, Australia and Africa.

Cover page of Native Americans at Mission Santa Cruz, 1791-1834

Native Americans at Mission Santa Cruz, 1791-1834

(1998)

When the Spanish colonized it in AD 1769, the California Coast was inhabited by speakers of no fewer than 16 distinct languages and an untold number of small, autonomous Native communities. These societies all survived by foraging, and ethnohistoric records show a wide range of adaptations emphasizing a host of different marine and terrestrial foods. Many groups exhibited signs of cultural complexity including sedentism, high population density, permanent social inequality, and sophisticated maritime technologies. The ethnographic era was preceded by an archaeological past that extends back to the terminal Pleistocene. Essays in this volume explore the last three and one half millennia...

Cover page of Recent Advances in the Archaeology of the Northern Andes: In Memory of Gerardo Reichel-Dolmatoff

Recent Advances in the Archaeology of the Northern Andes: In Memory of Gerardo Reichel-Dolmatoff

(1998)

The Northern Andes has had a subdued voice in the literature of American archaeology - even though it is a pivotal region for understanding many of the social, economic, political and ideological changes which pre-Columbian cultures experienced. Each of the eleven chapters presents a synthesis of an aspect of recent research in the region, and each is written by scholars who are actively engaged in that research.

Series: Monograph 39

Cover page of Approaches to the Historical Archaeology of Mexico, Central & South America

Approaches to the Historical Archaeology of Mexico, Central & South America

(1997)

This volume brings together for the first time a collection of articles by scholars working in the field of historical archaeology in Mexico, Central, and South America. Even though archaeologists have conducted investigations on historical sites in Latin America for many years, international borders have often limited interaction among researchers and the exchange of pertinent literature among interested readers. As a result, there has been little awarenesss or understanding of the breadth of research focused on the archaeology of postcontact Latin America, especially that performed outside the Carribean area. Although it is premature to attempt to synthesize all current research on...

Cover page of Down by the Station: Los Angeles Chinatown 1880-1933

Down by the Station: Los Angeles Chinatown 1880-1933

(1996)

In 1933, the demolition of the thriving Los Angeles Chinatown for the construction of Union Station sealed the remains of this intact community 14 feet below the railroad tracks. The planning and construction of the Metro Rail subway system five decades later included efforts to preserve and protect cultural resources in the area, detailed in this volume. The assemblage of excavated material objects reflects the import, preparation, and service of food; recreation; health practices; the presence of women and children, rubbish disposal practices; and degree of participation in local social networks. The unprecedented numbers and densities of artifacts illuminate aspects of lifeways not previously...

Cover page of Central California Coastal Prehistory: A View from Little Pico Creek

Central California Coastal Prehistory: A View from Little Pico Creek

(1995)

Reports on excavations at Little Pico Creek in San Luis Obispo County and assesses the temporal components and issues of cultural chronology, subsistence, mobility, and social structure.

Series: Perspectives in California Archaeology 3

Cover page of Hawaiian Adze Production and Distribution: Implications for the Development of Chiefdoms

Hawaiian Adze Production and Distribution: Implications for the Development of Chiefdoms

(1994)

Using a study of stone adzes of the precontact period on the island of Hawai'i, Lass examines the role of a material resource in the development of cultural complexity. Archaeological evidence is used to analyze the hypotheses that embrace the adaptationist and political approaches to increased complexity.

Cover page of A Conservation Manual for the Field Archaeologist

A Conservation Manual for the Field Archaeologist

(1994)

Conservation treatments and techniques for the archaeologist in the field, emphasizing how to conserve an excavated object before it is taken to a trained conservator offsite. Safety procedures and conservation supplies and materials are recommended. Techniques for lifting, cleaning, consolidating, marking, and storing are discussed, along with methods for treating specific artifact materials (e.g., amber, wood). Appendixes cover impressions and chemical preparations.

Cover page of New Light on Old Art: Recent Advances in Hunter-Gatherer Rock Art Research

New Light on Old Art: Recent Advances in Hunter-Gatherer Rock Art Research

(1994)

Rock art is the most visible aspect of the prehistoric hunter-gatherer archaeological record. Covering cave walls, cliff slides and boulder faces with painted and engraved designs, it challenges the archaeologist to address the symbolic, aesthetic, and religious sides of the past. Though traditionally marginalized in mainstream archaeology, recent advances in chronometric dating and interpretive techniques along with the development of cognitive archaeology, have brought rock art studies to the substantive and methodological forefront of the discipline...

Cover page of Pottery of Prehistoric Honduras: Regional Classification and Analysis

Pottery of Prehistoric Honduras: Regional Classification and Analysis

(1993)

The contributors to this volume have addressed issues of systematics in pottery analysis that perplex archaeologists wherever they work. These issues are not approached by setting forth rules or by adopting a how-to approach but rather by example as the various researchers give the background to their work, explain their methods, and present the classified pottery from their investigations. An in-process statement of what we are learning from pottery about chronology, interactions, and the nature of regional cultural development, this volume can be used by archaeologists working in southern Mesoamerica and northern Central America, who will find it valuable for comparative analysis...

Cover page of An Archaeologist's Guide to Chert and Flint

An Archaeologist's Guide to Chert and Flint

(1992)

For at least 2.5 million years, humans have been using tools, and until just a few thousand years ago their most important tools were of stone. The single most important and widely used stone in nearly every part of the world was chert, also known as flint. It was widely available, easily worked, and capable of being broken in a controlled manner to create sharp and durable edges. Artifacts of chert excavated in an archaeological context are invaluable to archaeologists; they are often the only surviving source of information about prehistoric cultures...

Cover page of Girikihaciyan: A Halafian Site in Southeastern Turkey

Girikihaciyan: A Halafian Site in Southeastern Turkey

(1990)

This report presents the results of excavations undertaken at the site of Girikihaciyan in southeastern Turkey during 1968 and 1970 by the Joint Prehistoric Project, Istanbul-Chicago under the overal direction of Professor Halet Cambel, University of Istanbul, and Professor Robert J. Braidwood, Oriental Institute, University of Chicago.

Series: Monographs 33

Cover page of Rice Bowls in the Delta: Artifacts Recovered from the 1915 Asian Community of Walnut Grove, California

Rice Bowls in the Delta: Artifacts Recovered from the 1915 Asian Community of Walnut Grove, California

(1988)

The artifacts recovered from the Walnut Grove are a significant addition to the research of the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Asian material culture. Of particular significance is the large collection of recovered Japanese ceramics. Deposited en masse following a devastating fire in 1915, they represent the table wares used by Walnut Grove's Japanese residents from ca. 1896 to 1915. Primarily products of the Meiji Period's technological revolution, these inexpensive porcelains have been largely overlooked in studies of Japanese pottery. 

Cover page of Excavations at Sitagroi: A Prehistoric Village in Northeast Greece Volume 1

Excavations at Sitagroi: A Prehistoric Village in Northeast Greece Volume 1

(1986)

The first of 2 volumes reporting on excavations at a middle neolithic to early bronze age site in northeast Greece. Vol. 1 presents the full sequence of culture exposed by excavation of this settlement mound, 10.5 m deep. Further studies define the environment during the 3 millennia of occupation and clarify the changing pattern of human subsistence over time. The chronological relationships for the Aegean, the Balkans, and Anatolia are examined in detail.

Cover page of Rock Art of East Mexico and Central America: An Annotated Bibliography

Rock Art of East Mexico and Central America: An Annotated Bibliography

(1979)

Strecker’s introduction to the first edition, reprinted here largely unchanged, raises questions about the techniques of production and avenues of interpretation, then concludes with a stylistic summary of Lower Central American rock art based upon earlier work of Stone (1948) and Krickeberg (1949). Partially because of the lack of discussion of rock art styles in Upper Central America and some need for clarification in usage, elsewhere I have attempted to define the rock art syles of Precolombian Guatemala and to suggest a standardized descriptive terminology which can be used throughout the New World in rock art contexts...

Cover page of The Transition to Mycenaean: A Stratified Middle Helladic II to Late Helladic IIA pottery sequence from Ayios Stephanos in Lakonia

The Transition to Mycenaean: A Stratified Middle Helladic II to Late Helladic IIA pottery sequence from Ayios Stephanos in Lakonia

(1976)

The following study is concerned only with pottery of the later Middle Helladic and early Mycenaean periods. In spite of its limited scope, we feel that the stratified ceramic sequence presented here has a unique importance not only in the archaeology of prehistoric Lakonia but also, in a broader sense, in the archaeology of prehistoric Greece as a whole. This sequence affords a unique opportunity to trace the effect of Cretan influence on Middle Helladic pottery which transformed the latter into the distinctly different Mycenaean pottery of the Late Helladic period...

 

Open Access Journal: Revista del Instituto de Historia Antigua Oriental "Dr. Abraham Rosenvasser"

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 [First posted in AWOL 31 May 2017, updated 15 October 2020]

Revista del Instituto de Historia Antigua Oriental "Dr. Abraham Rosenvasser"
ISSN: 0325-1209
Portada
El presente número de RIHAO aparece luego de un considerable tiempo desde la publi- cación del número anterior, situación que ha hecho necesario relanzar la revista bajo una nueva serie. El nuevo equipo de trabajo de la revista apunta, pues, en lo inmediato, a subsanar los graves problemas de periodicidad que la misma ha experimentado así como, fundamentalmente, a volver a poner al servicio de los investigadores de la historia antigua del Cercano Oriente de nuestro país la publicación o cial del Instituto dedicado a dicha especialidad en la Universidad de Buenos Aires. Más allá de las coyunturas económicas y los contextos institucionales que sin dudas afectan a toda producción académica, lograr la periodicidad de una publicación cientí ca –así lo creemos– expresa un compromiso serio con la necesidad de difusión de una especialidad. Pero, también hacen al carácter cientí co y académico de una publicación el mantenimiento de una actitud profesional junto con una variedad de aproximaciones inquisitivas y temáticas, así como la no menos necesaria contribución de especialistas del exterior. En ese senti- do, la revista se encuentra abierta a recibir contribuciones nacionales e internacionales que aborden todas las temáticas y especialidades del campo antiguo-oriental, desde miradas propias de la egiptología, la asiriología, la hititología, la iranología y los estu- dios bíblicos tradicionales, ancladas principalmente –aunque no exclusivamente– en aspectos lológicos y arqueológicos, hasta intervenciones derivadas intrínsecamente de los cambios y rupturas observados en las ciencias sociales y humanas desde los años ’60 del siglo pasado. Con este espíritu amplio e integrador, aunque sin soslayar en abso- luto el compromiso con la calidad disciplinar, reanudamos la publicación de RIHAO.

Los artículos enviados para consideración que no cumplan con las normas abajo especificadas serán devueltos al remitente.
Publicado: 2020-10-13

 

Publicado: 2019-12-16

núm. 19 (2018)


Tabla de contenidos


Artículos


Ancient Israel: A Way of Organizing Our Ignorance PDF
Niels Peter Lemche 5-19

La función de la iconografía en las culturas calcolíticas del Levante meridional: una lectura a partir del concepto de esferas de interacción PDF
Pablo F. Jaruf 21-47

La estela de Rediukhnum de Dendera y la reorganización administrativa del Estado egipcio a finales del III milenio a.C. PDF
Daniel González León 49-79

La religión de los antiguos persas en las filosofías de la historia PDF
Borja Antela-Bernárdez 81-91

Job, Prometheus Bound and the Embassy to Achilles PDF
Philippe Wajdenbaum 93-109

Reseñas


War & Trade with the Pharaohs. An Archaeological Study of Ancient Egypt's Foreign Relations, de Garry J. Shaw PDF
Augusto Gayubas 111-115

The Land of Canaan in the Late Bronze Age, de Lester L. Grabbe PDF
Emanuel Pfoh 116-118

Arqueólogos, etnólogos y espías. La misión de Leo Frobenius en Arabia y Eritrea (1914-1915), de Rocío Da Riva PDF
Emanuel Pfoh 119-120


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2010


Athenian Onomasticon Online

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[First posted in AWOL 7 June 2013, updated 15 October 2020]

Athenian Onomasticon
Sean G Byrne

Since the publication of the Lexicon of Greek Personal Names II (Attica) in 1994 and Foreign Residents of Athens in 1996, fresh epigraphic evidence has continued to emerge by the month in the form of newly published inscriptions and re-readings and reinterpretations of old material. This has entailed a steady enhancement in the state of the Attic onomsticon and prosopography, with new names added, evidence for known names and people supplemented, and misread or misinterpreted names abolished.

A gauge of this progress is provided only partially by the Bibliography, from which references are removed when subsumed by Supplementum Epigraphicum Graecum items. A better indication is given by the Addenda / Corrigenda to LGPN, posted by us at regular intervals until 2008, recording the cumulative changes to be made to the printed LGPN II. And in addition to these there are the extensive updates to bibliographic references provided by the publication of such corpora as Agora XVI and XVIII, IEleusis, IRhamnous and SEMA, not to mention the score of volumes of SEG that have appeared in the intervening years.

This site makes available the complete up-to-date onomastic data for the population of ancient Athens, through a search facility, and through html files that present the latest version of the Onomasticon.

Empire in Crisis: Gothic Invasions and Roman Historiography

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Empire in Crisis: Gothic Invasions and Roman Historiography: Beiträge einer internationalen Tagung zu den Wiener Dexipp-Fragmenten (Dexippus Vindobonensis) Wien, 3.–6. Mai 2017 

herausgegeben vonFritz Mitthof, Gunther Martin, Jana Grusková

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The volume, which has emerged from an international conference of the same title, unites a range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary contributions on invasions of Goths and other Germanic tribes into the Roman Empire, focusing primarily on the third-century CE. The newly discovered fragments of the lost work Scythica by the third-century historian Dexippus of Athens, the so-called Scythica Vindobonensia alias Dexippus Vindobonensis, which survived in a Greek palimpsest kept in the Austrian National Library in Vienna, have great impact on the study of this field. The contributions explore the Vienna fragments in their historical and historiographical contexts, from the Roman to the Byzantine Era, and the history of the invasions themselves.
 
Der Band, der aus einer internationalen Tagung gleichen Namens hervorgeht, vereinigt verschiedene disziplinäre und interdisziplinäre Perspektiven auf das Thema der gotischen und anderen germanischen Einfälle ins Römische Reich, besonders im 3. Jahrhundert n. Chr., das durch die neuen Fragmente aus dem verlorenen Werk Skythika des antiken Historikers Dexippos von Athen, die sog. Scythica Vindobonensia alias Dexippus Vindobonensis, die rezent in einem griechischen Palimpsest der Österreichischen Nationalbibliothek in Wien entdeckt wurden, wichtige Impulse erhalten hat. Die Beiträge behandeln den historischen und historiographischen Kontext der neuen Fragmente, von der römischen bis in die byzantinische Zeit, wie auch die Einfälle als solche. 
TYCHE Supplementband 12
Keywords
Late Ancient History, Ancient Historiography, Goths, Germanic tribes, Invasions into the Roman Empire, the Third Century CE, Ancient Greek Literature, Dexippus, Scythica Vindobonensia, Dexippus Vindobonensis, Palimpsest, Balkans; ÖFOS 2012, Ancient history; ÖFOS 2012, Classical philology; ÖFOS 2012, Palaeography; spätantike Geschichte, antike Historiographie, Goten, Germanen, Einfälle ins Römische Reich, 3. Jahrhundert n. Chr., antike griechische Literatur, Dexippus, Scythica Vindobonensia, Dexippus Vindobonensis, Palimpsest, Balkan; ÖFOS 2012, Alte Geschichte; ÖFOS 2012, Klassische Philologie; ÖFOS 2012, Paläographie
ISBN
9783903207387
Publisher
Holzhausen
Publication date and place
2020

Open Access Monograph Series: Cahiers de philologie

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Cahiers de philologie
Sous la direction de Fabienne Blaise, André Laks et Philippe Rousseau 
Dans la collection « Cahiers de philologie », le travail de l’interprétation est présenté et discuté selon ses différents niveaux de pertinence - les hypothèses et les résultats concrets, les préalables - en deux séries distinctes :
• Les volumes de la série Lestextes donneront des interprétations détaillées, selon le principe d’une herméneutique définie, d’œuvres littéraires et philosophiques de l’Antiquité.
• La série Apparat critique recueillera ou suscitera des essais, individuels ou collectifs, visant à définir les conditions du déchiffrement, pour la philologie au sens large, comme « sciences des œuvres », pour la connaissance historique et, plus généralement, pour l’ensemble des sciences humaines. Les volumes reviendront sur l’histoire de ces conditions (conceptuelles, mais aussi culturelles ou institutionnelles), discuteront de la légitimité des modèles utilisés et des problèmes de méthode que pose le traitement des « nouveaux objets historiques ». Une des règles essentielles de cette réflexion commune sera, d’un volume à l’autre ou à l’intérieur d’un ouvrage collectif, que se pratique le libre jeu de la critique.

    And see AWOL's Alphabetical List of Open Access Monograph Series in Ancient Studies

    The Economics of Urbanism in the Roman Eas

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    The Economics of Urbanism in the Roman East

    Rinse Willet (Hrsg.) 

     The Economics of Urbanism in the Roman East

    Panel 8.4 Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World – Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Cologne/Bonn 2018

    Dieser Band beschäftigt sich mit der Geographie der Städte des östlichen Mittelmeerraumes unter römischer Herrschaft. Die Altertumskunde hat sich intensiv mit römischem Urbanismus auseinandergesetzt, es ist jedoch so, dass viele Studien die antike Stadt als isoliertes historisches Phänomen betrachtet haben oder bestenfalls als Spiegelbild der Verbreitung des Hellenismus oder der Romanitas. Dieser Band versucht, einen Schritt weiterzugehen und die Stadt in sozioökonomischer Hinsicht zu verstehen und dabei die neuesten statistischen Daten für das Phänomen Stadt im römischen Osten zu präsentieren. Sechs Beiträge setzen sich hierbei mit Fragen der räumlichen Verteilung der Städte in der östlichen Reichshälfte auseinander. Ein Beitrag befasst sich als Vergleich mit Aspekten des römischen Urbanismus auf der Iberischen Halbinsel. Beginnend mit einem Überblick über den östlichen Mittelmeerraum als Ganzes, fokussiert sich jeder Beitrag auf eine spezifische Region zur Untersuchung der Faktoren, die das Muster der städtischen Besiedlung und die Variation der Stadtgröße auf (über-)regionaler und lokaler Ebene geprägt haben. Diese Faktoren sind vielfältig und reichen von klimatischen Schwankungen und Möglichkeiten der Konnektivität über Straßen oder Seewege über historische Pfadabhängigkeiten und das jeweilige landwirtschaftliche Potential bis hin zu spezifischen Strategien des römischen Imperialismus.

    Rinse Willet ist Archäologe an der Universität Leuven und Teil des archäologischen Forschungsprojektes in Sagalassos. Ab 2020 wird er Senior Fellow am Forschungszentrum für anatolische Zivilisationen (ANAMED) der Koç-Universität in Istanbul.

    Inhaltsverzeichnis
    PDF
    Titelei
    Contents
    Preface
    Rinse Willet
    The Economics of Urbanism in the Roman East: Introductory Notes
    Rinse Willet
    Facets of Roman Urbanism in Anatolia
    Damjan Donev
    Aspects of Roman Urbanization in the Hellenistic Balkans
    Paul Kloeg
    The Urban Levant
    Tønnes Bekker-Nielsen
    Roman Urbanism in the Pontic Frontier Zone
    Pieter Houten
    Urbanism on the Iberian Peninsula during the High Empire
    Empfohlene Zitierweise

    Willet, Rinse (Hrsg.): The Economics of Urbanism in the Roman East: Panel 8.4, Heidelberg: Propylaeum, 2020 (Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World – Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Cologne/Bonn 2018, Band 43). https://doi.org/10.11588/propylaeum.571

    Lizenz

    Dieses Werk ist unter der
    Creative Commons-Lizenz 4.0
    (CC BY-SA 4.0)
    veröffentlicht.

    Identifikatoren
    ISBN 978-3-947450-96-1 (PDF)
    ISBN 978-3-947450-97-8 (Softcover)

    Veröffentlicht am 14.10.2020.

    Open Access Monograph Series: Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World – Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Cologne/Bonn 2018

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    Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World – Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Cologne/Bonn 2018


    Die vorliegenden Bände bilden die Abschlusspublikation des 19. Internationalen Kongresses für Klassische Archäologie, der vom 22. bis 26. Mai 2018 unter der Ägide der ‘Associazione Internazionale di Archaeologica Classica (AIAC)’ in Köln und Bonn abgehalten wurde. Unter dem Titel ‘Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World’ beschäftigten sich mehr als 900 Einzelvorträge, gegliedert in 11 Sektionen und 128 Panels mit unterschiedlichsten Fragen zur antiken Wirtschaftsgeschichte.

    Tatsächlich durchdringen wirtschaftliche Aspekte alle Bereiche des öffentlichen und privaten Lebens in alten Gesellschaften, sei es in der Stadtentwicklung, der Religion, der Kunst, dem Wohnen oder dem Tod. Die Erforschung der antiken Wirtschaft spielt seit langem eine wichtige Rolle in der Alten Geschichte. In den letzten Jahrzehnten ist aber auch in der Archäologie zunehmend das Bewusstsein gewachsen, dass die materielle Kultur alter Gesellschaften ausgezeichnete Möglichkeiten bietet, die Struktur, Leistung und Dynamik alter Wirtschaftssysteme und Wirtschaftsprozesse zu untersuchen. Hauptziel dieses Kongresses war es daher, die Ökonomie als ein zentrales Element der klassischen Gesellschaften zu verstehen und ihre Wechselwirkung mit ökologischen, politischen, sozialen, religiösen und kulturellen Hintergründen zu analysieren. Das Thema des Kongresses richtete sich an alle Disziplinen, die sich mit der griechisch-römischen Zivilisation und ihren Nachbarkulturen von der ägäischen Bronzezeit bis zum Ende der Spätantike befassen.

    In der vorliegenden Reihe werden schrittweise 52 dieser Panels als eigenständige Themenbände vorgelegt. Am Ende des Publikationsprozesses soll zudem eine gebündelte Fassung aller Beiträge verfügbar gemacht werden

    Michael Heinzelmann , Cathalin Recko (Hrsg.)

    Quantifying Ancient Building Economy
    Panel 3.24

    Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World – Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Cologne/Bonn 2018, Band 23

    Die Forschung zu antiker Baugeschichte und Architektur hat sich in den letzten Jahren auf wirtschaftliche Aspekte der unterschiedlichen Bau- und Arbeitsprozesse fokussiert. In diesem Zuge können nicht nur einzelne Arbeitsschritte und Abläufe untersucht werden, sondern auch die Organisation einer Baustelle. Dafür werden Versuche unternommen, sowohl das Baumaterial als auch die benötigte Arbeitszeit zum Bau eines Gebäudes zu quantifizieren, um die Größenordnung sowie die gesamtwirtschaftlichen Auswirkungen zu erfassen.

    Ziel dieses Bandes ist es, verschiedene Ansätze zur Untersuchung dieser Bauökonomie zusammenzubringen. Mit Hilfe der Methodik der Quantifizierung sowie detaillierter Studien zur Architektur werden die Bauwerke der hier gesammelten Fallstudien in Bezug auf ihre baulichen Charakteristika und die damit verbundenen wirtschaftlichen Implikationen beleuchtet. Zu diesen Bauwerken gehören Stadtmauern, Holzbauten, Thermen und Tempel. Der zeitliche Horizont der Beiträge erstreckt sich vom Messene des 4. Jh. v. Chr. bis hin zur Kaiserzeit und wird vervollständigt durch praxisorientierte Einblicke in Ingenieurshandbücher aus dem 19. Jh.

    Verena Gassner (Hrsg.)

    Regional exchange of ceramics – case studies and methodology
    Panel 5.7

    Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World – Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Cologne/Bonn 2018, Band 30

    Gefäße und andere Objekte aus Keramik stellen eine wichtige Quelle für die Rekonstruktion von Tausch und Handel in antiken Gesellschaften dar, da sie in großen Mengen verfügbar sind und ihre Herkunft oft mit archäologischen und archäometrischen Methoden bestimmt werden kann. Studien zum Handel mit Keramik konzentrieren sich jedoch zumeist auf den Fernhandel, da die Unterschiede von Waren und Formtypen zwischen Produkten aus weit auseinanderliegenden Gebieten leichter erkannt werden können. Das hat gemeinsam mit dem psychologischen Faktor, dass Gegenstände des Fernhandels oft größere Aufmerksamkeit finden, dazu geführt, dass Objekte des Fernhandels in der archäologischen Forschung eine überdimensionale Aufmerksamkeit gefunden haben, während der regionale Austausch von Gütern zwischen benachbarten Städten bisher wenig erforscht wurde, obwohl er wichtige Einblicke in die Beziehungen zwischen diesen Städten ermöglichen würde.
    Einer der Gründe dafür liegt sicherlich in der Schwierigkeit, dass Keramikprodukte aus benachbarten Regionen häufig nur schwer unterschieden werden können, da sie oft dasselbe Formenrepertoire sowie Dekorationsstile aufweisen.
    Dieses Panel stellt Fallstudien aus unterschiedlichen Perioden und Regionen des Mittelmeerraums vor, die sich mit der Problematik der Rekonstruktion von Netzwerken des regionalen Austausches beschäftigen, aber auch ihre Bedeutung für die Wirtschaft der antiken Städte zeigen.

    Elon D. Heymans , Marleen K. Termeer (Hrsg.)

    Politics of Value: New Approaches to Early Money and the State
    Panel 5.11

    Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World – Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Cologne/Bonn 2018, Band 33

    Als eine der beständigsten Ikonen des Wirtschaftslebens war Geld von der Antike bis zur Gegenwart ein gemeinsames Merkmal und ein zentraler Fokuspunkt in komplexen Gesellschaften. Im Laufe des ersten Jahrtausends v. Chr. gewann es als wesentliches Merkmal der Volkswirtschaften des Mittelmeerraums an Gewicht, meist in Form von Münzen. Aber Geld ist mehr als nur eine Münze, und seine Bedeutung ist nicht nur im engeren Feld der "Wirtschaft" allgegenwärtig.

    Im antiken Mittelmeerraum waren Geld und sein Bedeutungsgewinn überwiegend mit dem Staat assoziiert. Aber kann Geld nur unter staatlicher Autorität entstehen? Der vorliegende Band hinterfragt den vermuteten Zusammenhang zwischen der Verbreitung früher Geldformen und dem Staat und macht auf verschiedene Möglichkeiten aufmerksam, wie Geld als Innovation verankert und gesellschaftlich eingebettet werden konnte.

    Eugenia Equini Schneider (Hrsg.)

    Men, Goods and Ideas Travelling over the Sea. Cilicia at the Crossroad of Eastern Mediterranean Trade Network
    Panel 5.16

    Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World – Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Cologne/Bonn 2018, Band 35

    Aufgrund seiner besonderen geographischen Lage an der Kreuzung der wichtigsten See- und Landhandelsrouten, an einem Übergangs- und Verbindungspunkt zwischen Syrien, Zypern und Ägypten, spielte Kilikien eine bedeutende Rolle im Kontext des kulturellen, sozialen und wirtschaftlichen Austauschs im Mittelmeerraum. Insbesondere während seiner Romanisierung waren die Handelsbeziehungen zu den verschiedenen Gebieten des Reiches, insbesondere zum östlichen Mittelmeerraum, von grundlegender Bedeutung, die bis in frühbyzantinische Zeit substantiell und dauerhaft unterhalten wurden. Gegenstand dieses Panels war eine Übersicht zum Forschungsstand über diese Region, mit einem Schwerpunkt auf interdisziplinären Studien zu Produktionsaustausch, Handel und Verkehr im Mittelmeerraum. Die Unterwasserforschung, archäologische und geophysikalische Untersuchungen von Hafenbecken, Untersuchungen zu Produktionsanlagen und Analysen der materiellen Kultur und der numismatischen Zeugnisse haben zu einem umfangreichen Panorama der Veränderungen und Transformationsprozesse geführt, die die Region und ihre städtischen Zentren im Laufe der Jahrhunderte als Ergebnis großer sozialer und wirtschaftlicher Prozesse betroffen haben. Die daraus resultierende Fülle von Informationen über die Rolle der Region als Produktionszentrum und Umschlagplatz hat komparative Beispiele für andere Forschungsarbeiten in Kilikien und der südöstlichen Türkei erbracht.

    Enrico Giorgi , Giuseppe Lepore , Anna Gamberini (Hrsg.)

    Boundaries Archaeology: Economy, Sacred Places, Cultural Influences in the Ionian and Adriatic Areas
    Panel 7.3

    Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World – Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Cologne/Bonn 2018, Band 39

    Die Gebiete des adriatisch-ionischen Raums waren sowohl aus politischer als auch aus kultureller Sicht voneinander abgegrenzt, sodass sie einen hervorragenden Raum für das Studium antiken wirtschaftlichen und kulturellen Austauschs darstellen. Dieses Aufeinandertreffen von Kulturen führte zu wechselseitigen Einflüssen und zu kultureller Osmose auf verschiedenen Ebenen und zu verschiedenen Zeiten. Unterschiedliche historische und geographische Rahmenbedingungen führten hierbei oftmals zu ähnlichen Ergebnissen.

    Jüngste archäologische Forschungen lassen dabei vermuten, dass Heiligtümer und heilige Orte geeignete Kontexte sind, in denen diese Phänomene analysiert werden können, da sie in ihrer Rolle als Begegnungsorte und Stätten kultureller Unterweisung besonders von wirtschaftlichen und politischen Interessen geprägt wurden.

    Die in diesem Buch gesammelten Beiträge behandeln diese Themen aus verschiedenen Blickwinkeln, einschließlich Studien zur Geschichtsschreibung, zur materiellen Kultur und zur Numismatik. Die Fallstudien des adriatischen Raumes konzentrieren sich auf die Westküste und insbesondere auf den Bereich des Ager Gallicus und Picenum, wobei hier ein besonderer Schwerpunkt auf jenen Zeiten liegt, welche der Etablierung der römischen Herrschaft in diesem Gebiet vorausgehen und diese mit einschließen (3. / 2. Jh. v. Chr.). Die Fallstudien des südadriatischen und ionischen Raumes konzentrieren sich hingegen auf Apulien und das Gebiet von Illyrien und Epirus von archaischer Zeit bis zum Beginn der Römerzeit (4. – 1. Jh. v. Chr.).

    Rinse Willet (Hrsg.)

    The Economics of Urbanism in the Roman East
    Panel 8.4

    Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World – Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Cologne/Bonn 2018, Band 43

    Dieser Band beschäftigt sich mit der Geographie der Städte des östlichen Mittelmeerraumes unter römischer Herrschaft. Die Altertumskunde hat sich intensiv mit römischem Urbanismus auseinandergesetzt, es ist jedoch so, dass viele Studien die antike Stadt als isoliertes historisches Phänomen betrachtet haben oder bestenfalls als Spiegelbild der Verbreitung des Hellenismus oder der Romanitas. Dieser Band versucht, einen Schritt weiterzugehen und die Stadt in sozioökonomischer Hinsicht zu verstehen und dabei die neuesten statistischen Daten für das Phänomen Stadt im römischen Osten zu präsentieren. Sechs Beiträge setzen sich hierbei mit Fragen der räumlichen Verteilung der Städte in der östlichen Reichshälfte auseinander. Ein Beitrag befasst sich als Vergleich mit Aspekten des römischen Urbanismus auf der Iberischen Halbinsel. Beginnend mit einem Überblick über den östlichen Mittelmeerraum als Ganzes, fokussiert sich jeder Beitrag auf eine spezifische Region zur Untersuchung der Faktoren, die das Muster der städtischen Besiedlung und die Variation der Stadtgröße auf (über-)regionaler und lokaler Ebene geprägt haben. Diese Faktoren sind vielfältig und reichen von klimatischen Schwankungen und Möglichkeiten der Konnektivität über Straßen oder Seewege über historische Pfadabhängigkeiten und das jeweilige landwirtschaftliche Potential bis hin zu spezifischen Strategien des römischen Imperialismus.

    Achim Lichtenberger , Oren Tal , Zeev Weiss (Hrsg.)

    Judaea/Palaestina and Arabia: Cities and Hinterlands in Roman and Byzantine Times
    Panel 8.6

    Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World – Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Cologne/Bonn 2018, Band 44

    Seit mehreren Jahrzehnten steht die Survey-Archäologie und die Untersuchung von Stadt-Hinterland-Beziehungen im Fokus der mediterranen Archäologie. In der südlichen Levante wurden diese Ansätze bisher jedoch nur selten verfolgt. So wurden nur wenige Städte dieser Region durch systematische intensive oder extensive Surveys untersucht. Dieser Band ist der städtischen Infrastruktur gewidmet und konzentriert sich auf die Untersuchung der Beziehungen zwischen Städten und ihrem Hinterland. Hierbei fokussiert er sich auf Haupt- und Nebenverwaltungszentren in Judäa / Palästina und Arabien unter römischer und byzantinischer Herrschaft (1. bis 7. Jh. n. Chr.). Während die Erforschung der historischen Geographie der südlichen Levante eine lange Tradition hat, haben sich heutzutage die Forschungsfragen gewandelt und die Erforschung von Mikroregionen und ihres Hinterlandes steht nun in vielen Fällen im Mittelpunkt der Projekte. Solche Studien können nur systematisch durchgeführt werden, wobei multidisziplinäre Ansätze und hochauflösende Analysen verwendet werden, um alle Arten von Zonen städtischer Siedlungen und Verbindungen innerhalb des Standorts und seiner Peripherie und seines Hinterlandes zu untersuchen. Die Beiträge dieses Bandes bieten einen ersten Versuch, die städtischen Siedlungen in der südlichen Levante aus einer vergleichenden Perspektive zu betrachten.

     Alphabetical List of Open Access Monograph Series in Ancient Studies

    Online Open House | Uncanny Intruders: Ghosts and Greek Literature, with Robert Cioffi

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    Online Open House | Uncanny Intruders: Ghosts and Greek Literature, with Robert Cioffi

    We are pleased to welcome Robert Cioffi of Bard College, for an Online Open House discussion entitled “Uncanny Intruders: Ghosts and Greek Literature.” The discussion will be live-streamed on the Center for Hellenic Studies YouTube channel on Friday, October 23 at 11 a.m. EDT, and will be recorded.

    In preparation for this event, you might like to read this passages:

    • The ghost of Patroklos at Iliad 23.65–108, available from the Ancient Greek Hero in 24 Hours Sourcebook
    • The ghost of Clytemnestra at Aeschylus’ Eumenides 94-139, available from the Ancient Greek Hero in 24 Hours Sourcebook
    • P.Oxy. 1368, a fragment of Lollianus’ Phoenicica, a fragmentary fictional text written in Greek probably in the second century CE; it is identified in its original edition (on page 119–120) as “Romance.”
    • Lucian’s Lover of Lies especially sections 27, 30–31

    Robert Cioffi is Assistant Professor of Classics at Bard College. His research interests and recent publications center on Greek prose fiction of the Roman imperial period and travel, ethnography, and identity in the ancient world. He is currently completing a monograph on the ethnographic discourse of the Greek novels, entitled Narrating the Marvelous: The Greek Novel and the Ancient Ethnographic Imagination. Recent publications include articles on epiphany in the Greek novels, the relationship between Greek and Roman novels, and travel in the Roman world. In addition to his scholarly publications, he is a contributor to the London Review of Books. He is also developing two new areas of research. The first is focused on the Renaissance reception of the Greek novels. The second is about the representation of ghosts and the supernatural in Greek literature.

     

    Bloomsbury Open: Classics

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     Bloomsbury Open: Classics

    Bloomsbury Open: Biblical Studies

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    Bloomsbury Open: Biblical Studies


    Aliento: Analyse Linguistique, Interculturelle d’ÉNoncés sapientiels et Transmission Orient/Occident

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    Aliento: Analyse Linguistique, Interculturelle d’ÉNoncés sapientiels et Transmission Orient/Occident


    The Alientoproject focuses on medieval sapiential texts translated and circulated in the Iberian Peninsula during the Middle Ages between the 9th and the 15th centuries.

    Our basic unit of study is the Brief Sapiential Statement, a global denomination which includes proverbs, sentences, maxims, sayings, aphorisms, apophthegmata…, and whose definition is: every statement (from one word up to two or three sentences) presented as a unit containing a lesson, an advice, a moral, a judgment (moral or social)

    The Alientoproject intends to show how Brief Sapiential Statements (BSSfrom now on) of ancient origin were shared and exchanged between 3 religious cultures and 5 languages in the Iberian Peninsula in the Middle Ages (9th– 15th c.). We have chosen a minimalcorpus given their well-known relationship in order to develop a methodology of annotations and a tool allowing to cross these texts and establish links between the BSS, regardless of the language used in the original text. Textual medieval treatises are written in Latin, Arabic, Castilian, Hebrew and Catalan.

    The database objective is to build a model of efficient descriptiontransferable to other similar corpus, making it possible to compare the BSS of every sapiential text (ancient, medieval, modern or contemporary) with the other texts of the database.

    Open Access Journal: Atene e Roma

    Ancient Greek Tutorials @ AtticGreek.org

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    Ancient Greek Tutorials @ AtticGreek.org
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    AtticGreek.org is the home of the revised Ancient Greek Tutorials by Donald Mastronarde, adjusted to conform to the changes made in the second edition of Introduction to Attic Greek (University of California Press 2013) and to provide additional supplements to that book. Many parts of this site will be helpful, however, to anyone beginning or reviewing the study of ancient Greek with any textbook.
    If you are using the first edition of Introduction to Attic Greek, visit the site tailored to the first edition.

    This site should display Greek correctly if viewed with a modern browser on a modern operating system, without further action by the user. If, however, Greek words are cut off, or the Greek is displayed with a combination of different fonts or with a combination of characters and rectangles, then the user should install one of the free fonts recommended below.

    Open Access Journal: Bristol Institute of Greece, Rome and the Classical Tradition Annual Report

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     [First posted in AWOL 12 January 2018, updated 17 October 2020]

     Bristol Institute of Greece, Rome and the Classical Tradition Annual Report

    The IGRCT promotes research into all aspects of Greco-Roman culture from antiquity to the present day, in the belief that classical culture remains a vital influence in the modern world. It embraces research from many fields, including history of all kinds, archaeology, literary studies, art history and philosophy, and has a particular focus on research that explores the links between ancient and modern.
    The Institute was formed in 2004 through the merger of the Bristol Institute of Hellenic and Roman Studies, founded in 2000 by Robert Fowler, and the Bristol Centre for the Classical Tradition, founded by the late Thomas Wiedemann. It achieves its aims by hiring postdoctoral research fellows and supporting their research, inviting distinguished scholars to give seminars and lectures, holding symposia and conferences, cultivating international links with other scholars and organisations, and supporting the development of research projects in the faculty.
    The work of the Institute would be impossible without the generous contributions of individual and corporate donors, and we would like to express our gratitude for their continued support.

     

    Nouveaux textes babyloniens sur Achemenet

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    L'équipe en charge des textes babyloniens sur le site <achemenet.com> annonce la mise en ligne des transcriptions des textes CT 55 n°1 à 200 (majoritairement de l'Ebabbar de Sippar) et d'une grande partie des archives privées d'Uruk d'époque achéménide (règnes de Darius Ier à Darius III) à l'adresse:<http://www.achemenet.com/fr/tree/?/sources-textuelles>

    New Open Access Journal: Judaica. Neue digitale Folge (JNDF)

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    Judaica. Neue digitale Folge (JNDF)
    Logo in der Kopfzeile
    Judaica. Neue digitale Folge (JNDF) ist eine 2019 gegründete wissenschaftliche Zeitschrift mit Peer Review zu allen Bereichen der Jüdischen Studien von der Antike bis zur Moderne. Sie erscheint zweimal pro Jahr. JNDF ist eine Nachfolgezeitschrift der Judaica. Beiträge zum Verstehen des Judentums, die in 74 Jahrgängen als Printversion erschien. Die neue Judaica veröffentlicht Artikel in deutscher, französischer und englischer Sprache. Wie ihre Vorgängerzeitschrift hat sie einen starken Bezug zur Judaistik der Schweizer Universitäten, steht aber selbstredend allen als wissenschaftliche Plattform offen. Redaktionssitz ist das Institut für Judaistik der Universität Bern. Neben Artikeln publiziert JNDF auch Rezensionen.
    Die erste Ausgabe wird voraussichtlich im ersten Halbjahr 2020 erscheinen.

    Bd. 1 (2020)

    Veröffentlicht: 16-10-2020

    Editorial

    See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies

    Open Access Journal: BAF-Online: Proceedings of the Berner Altorientalisches Forum

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     [First posted in AWOL 7 June 2018, updated 19 October 2020]

    BAF-Online: Proceedings of the Berner Altorientalisches Forum
    ISSN: 2504-2076

    BAF Online
    BAF-Online is the publication platform of the Berner Altorientalisches Forum (BAF). It makes available to the public within the shortest possible delays vidcasts of the talks that have been held at the BAF. The vidcasts published at BAF Online have been peer-reviewed by members of the BAF scientific committee and are quotable. The aim of BAF-Online is to facilitate the dissemination and publication of ideas prior to final results.

    The Berner Altorientalisches Forum (BAF) is an annual international meeting designed to bring together researchers of the Ancient Near East specialising in different areas and disciplines. There is no theme. Participants are encouraged to communicate their ideas as concisely as possible. Talks last no more than 10 minutes and are vidcasted.

    The idea of setting up a forum designed to bring together specialists from all disciplines active in all areas of the Ancient Near East broadly defined was put forward by Johanna Tudeau in January 2015. The BAF project followed, developed in the course of a conversation between Johanna and Mirko Novák. The first BAF took place in Bern on 24-25 June 2016, organised by Johanna and Hannah Mönninghoff with the support of the BAF Committee

    Current Issue

    Vol. 3 (2018)
    Published: 10-09-2019
    View All Issues

     

    2017

    Vol 2 (2017)

    Table of Contents

    Programme of the 2nd BAF, 28-29 June 2017
     
    Guiding Questions for Panels
     

    Panel 1: Defining spheres of influence

    Jeannette Boertien
    Nurcan Küçükarslan

    Panel 2: Recovering function, purpose and meaning

    Anna Glenn
    Nicole Herzog

    Panel 3: Describing language and symbolism

    Nelson Henrique da Silva Ferreira
    Sara Manasterska

    Panel 5: Managing and using data across different fields of study and research

    Sebastian Borkowski
    Michael Mäder
    Eva Schmalenberger






    The lecture series FORVM ANTIKE

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    The lecture series FORVM ANTIKE

     

    The lecture series FORVM ANTIKE came into being in the winter term 2013 as a cooperation between the Department of Ancient History and the Department of Numismatics as successor of CONGIARIVM. As speakers, we invited experts in the fields of Ancient History, Epigraphy, Papyrology, Etruscology and Numismatics from all around the world. Colleagues from the participating institutes in Vienna have so far constituted the main audience of FORVM ANTIKE.

    The COVID-19-pandemic has led to the adoption of a new online format for the lectures, allowing us to reach a broader and more international audience.

    The lectures are now organised by the Department of Ancient History, the Department of Numismatics and the Department of Byzantine Studies, with the support of the Forschungsschwerpunkt Kulturen des euromediterranen Raums und Altertumswissenschaften.

    Organisers:Chiara CENATIDavid HACKMartin HALLMANNSECKERTina HOBEL, Cosimo PARAVANONadine Franziska RIEGLERDavid WEIDGENANNT


    Programme Winter Semester 2020/2021

    All the lectures will take place online on the platform Collaborate. The link to the event will be shared one day before the lecture on this website. Attendance is open to anyone interested.

     

    28 October 2020 5:00 p.m. GMT+1

    Ian RUTHERFORD, Hana NAVRATILOVA (University of Reading)
    Graffiti and Cultural Memory in Greco-Roman Egypt: The Case of Abydos (Abstract)

    Access to the lecture

     

    11 November 2020 5:00 p.m. GMT+1

    Annalisa MARZANO (University of Reading)
    The Augustan Horticultural Revolution (Abstract)

    Access to the lecture

     

    9 December 2020 11:00 a.m. GMT+1

    Malcolm CHOAT (Macquarie University, Sydney)
    A Forger, his models, methods, and motives: The papyri of Constantine Simonides (Abstract)

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    20 January 2021 5:00 p.m. GMT +1

    Loreleï VANDERHEYDEN (Universität Heidelberg)
    From the Nile to the Danube. A Survey of the Coptic Letters in the Vienna Papyrological Collections (Abstract)

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    27 January 2021 5:00 p.m. GMT+1

    Francesca CECI (Soprintendenza di Roma Capitale, Musei Capitolini Roma)
    Die Stadtgeschichte Roms im Münzbild (Abstract)

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    Chronique des fouilles et découvertes archéologiques à Chypre

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    Open Access Resources on Cyprus Assembled by Derek B. Counts

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    Open Access Resources on Cyprus Assembled by Derek B. Counts

    Links to open access monographs and other volumes that are relevant to the study of Cypriot archaeology, especially sculpture. Of special interest are the nineteenth-century antiquarian accounts (Sakellarios, Doell, Cesnola, Colonna-Ceccaldi, Lang, etc), as well as important, learned work from the turn of the century by Myres and Ohnefalsch-Richter. Several more recent volumes are also included in cases where online or open-access is available. Volumes are listed in order of their date of publication (apologies in advance for the forced scroll/browse).

    Open Access Journals for Cypriot Archaeology

    Chronique des fouilles et découvertes archéologiques à Chypre
    Bulletin de correspondance hellénique

    Initiated in 1959 by Dr. Vassos Karageorghis, the Chronique des fouilles et découvertes archéologiques à Chypre of the Bulletin de correspondance hellénique remains one of the most significant contributions to archaeological research in Cyprus. Designed to offer a comprehensive, annual report of archaeological activity on the island, the Chronique des fouilles, provides an archive of data essential for research. Full-text and searchable (!) online/pdf versions are now available via Persée, a site sponsored by the French Ministry of State for Higher Education and Research designed to offer digital publication of scientific journals in the field of the humanities. The BCH is among the journals catalogued (as well as Syria, Paléorient, and the Comptes-rendus des séances de l’Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres). A full listing, year by year, from 1959-2005, may be found by following the link above. The BCH contains exacation reports and synthetic studies related to Cypriot archaeology – and the full series (1877 until 2014) is available open access HERE.

    Cahiers du Centre d’Études Chypriotes
    Full-text and searchable (!) online/pdf. Dedicated to the study of ancient Cyprus, the CCEC is arguably one of the most important journals for the study of Cypriot archaeology, history, language, etc. Published by the Centre d’Études Chypriotes. Open access courtesy of Persée.

    Monographs, Synthetic Studies, Excavations (+ Antiquarian studies), Catalogues

    Ta Kypriaka: ētoi, Pragmateia peri geōgraphias, archaiologias, statistikēs
    A. A . Sakellarios (Athens, 1855)
    An incredibly learned and far-ranging account of Cyprus, which touches on language, archaeology, local customs, topography etc. Among his many contributions, Sakellarios was the first person to associate the ancient toponym ‘Golgoi’ with the archaeological remains north and east of modern Athienou. Searchable, online version. Full .pdf can also be downloaded here. Other volumes/editions are also available. Courtesy of Archive.org.

    Die Sammlung Cesnola
    J. Doell  (St. Petersburg, 1873)
    In 1873, J. Doell published an inventory of the Cesnola collection of Cypriot antiquities on behalf of the Hermitage Museum which was considering purchasing the collection. The plates from this volume are reproduced here. For the entire searchable volume and downloadable .pdf (courtesy of Archive.org), go here. The importance of this work cannot be overestimated since it represents a contemporary account of the collection, before many of the controversial restorations that occurred after the collection arrived at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

    Cyprus: Its Ancient Cities, Tombs, and Temples
    L. Palma di Cesnola (New York, 1878)
    Full-text (on-line) or (downloadable .pdf) of Cesnola’s principal narrative of late nineteenth century excavations on Cyprus, including the account of his discoveries of limestone sculptures from sanctuaries in the region of Athienou/Golgoi. The bulk of Cesnola’s collection made its way to the Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York) forming the nucleus of that museum’s collection when it opened in 1880. Cesnola served as the Met’s first director. See below for links to the Met’s www site on the Cesnola collection, as well as the on-line catalogue of Cesnola artifacts now housed in the Semitic Museum (Harvard). Courtesy of Archive.org & Google Books.

    Narrative of Excavations in a Temple at Dali (Idalium) in Cyprus
    R. H. Lang and R. S. Poole (Trans. Royal Society of Literature, UK vol. no. 11, 1878)

    Begins on page 30. Primary account of the nineteenth century excavations at Idalion by Robert Hamilton Lang. Includes description of work, as well as discussion of the artifacts recovered by R. S. Poole (see especially, pp. 54-63, where Poole outlines various stylistic influences in Cypriote sculpture). Searchable, online version. Full .pdf can also be downloaded here. Courtesy of Archive.org.

    Monuments antiques de Chypre, de Syrie et d’Égypte
    G. Colonna-Ceccaldi (Paris, 1882)

    An important account of early explorations in Cyprus. Most significantly, Colonna-Ceccaldi, the French consult to Cyprus, provides a contemporary account of the discoveries of L. Palma di Cesnola at the the site of Golgoi (near modern Athienou), which brought to light a large cache of limestone sculptures (now in the Met, NYC). Searchable, online version. Full .pdf can also be downloaded here. Courtesy of Archive.org.

    Salaminia (Cyprus): The Histories, Treasures, and Antiquities of Salamis in the Island of Cyprus 2nd ed.
    Alexander Palma di Cesnola (London, 1884)

    Full-text and searchable (on-line) copy of Alexander Cesnola’s (Luigi’s brother) publication of investigations at Salamis. Downloadable .pdf also available. Courtesy of Archive.org.

    History of art in Phoenicia and its dependencies (Vol. 2)
    G. Perrot and C. Chipiez (London, 1885)

    A classic volume dealing with Cypriot sculpture, offering an important look at nineteenth-century views on the style and overall character of Cypriot art. Searchable, online version. Full .pdf can also be downloaded here. Courtesy of Archive.org.

    A Descriptive Atlas of the Cesnola Collection of Cypriot Antiquities in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
    L. Palma di Cesnola (1885-1902)
    Multi-volume, monumental publication of the Cesnola Collection upon their arrival at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (more here). Most comprehensive, illustrated publication of the collection prior to various dispersals (e.g., 1920s Anderson Gallery sales). Courtesy of Hathi Trust.

    Naukratis. Part II. 1885-6
    E. A. Gardner and F. Ll. Griffith (London, 1888)

    Excavation report on Naukratis, which includes the important discovery of Cypriot-style stone statuettes in the so-called “Temple and Temenos of Aphrodite”. Chapter VI is devoted to the statuettes. Searchable, online version. Full .pdf can also be downloaded here. Courtesy of Archive.org and Google Books.

    Kypros, the Bible and Homer : oriental civilization, art and religion in ancient times
    M. Ohnefalsch-Richter (London, 1893)

    Chronicle of Ohnefalsch-Richter’s excavations on Cyprus. Includes catalogue of sanctuaries identified by O-R. as well as illustrations of finds. The volume is fundamental for research in Cypriote limestone sculpture, as well as Cypriote religion. Searchable, online version. Full .pdf can also be downloaded. Courtesy of Archive.org.

    A Catalogue of the Cyprus Museum with a Chronicle of Excavations Undertaken Since the British Occupation
    J. L. Myres and M. Ohnefalsch-Richter (Oxford, 1899)

    Represents an important source for the collections of the Cyprus Museum. Chronicle of excavations also includes information on excavated sanctuaries. The catalogue is the result of a complete reorganization of the museum by Myres and Ohnefalsch-Richter. Searchable, online version. Full .pdf can also be downloaded here. Courtesy of Archive.org.

    Handbook of the Cesnola collection of antiquities from Cyprus
    J. L. Myres (New York, 1914)

    Fundamental, early publication of the extensive holdings of Cypriote antiquities in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. The bulk of the collection was purchased from Cesnola, including an impressive corpus of limestone sculptures. Includes significant comparative research and is essential for the study of Cypriote sculpture. Searchable, online version. Full .pdf can also be downloaded here. Courtesy of Archive.org.

    See also:
    Metropolitan Museum of Art. Handbook No. 3. Sculptures of the Cesnola Collection of Cypriote Antiquities (New York, 1880)

    An early museum guide to the Cesnola sculptures at the Met, originally displayed in the “East Entrance Hall and North Aisle”. Written by Mr. A. Duncan Savage.

    Catalogue of Sculpture in the Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities of the British Museum I.2: Cypriote and Etruscan
    F. N. Pryce (London, 1931)
    Publication of the impressive collection of Cypriot limestone sculpture in the British Museum. Superseded by later studies (esp. Gaber-Saletan and Senff), it is still a valuable resource. Most of the statues came from excavations in/around the Iron age polity of Idalion. excavated by R. H. Lang (see above for his account).

    The Swedish Cyprus Expedition: Finds and Results of the Excavations in Cyprus, 1927-1931 (see below for links)
    E. Gjerstad, A. Westolm, J. Lindros, and Erik Sjöqvist (Stockholm, 1934-1978)

    Multi-volume publication of the results of the Swedish Cyprus Expedition (SCE) between 1927-1931. The publication of the Swedish Cyprus Expedition revolutionized our understanding in each of the phases of Cypriot history from prehistoric through Roman times and may be viewed as the foundation of all later studies in Cypriot archaeology, even if necessary and expected revisions have inevitably been introduced. The SCE brought a sophisticated, scientifically-based archaeological approach to the island that paid dividends in creating relative, stratigraphic sequences at many sites.  The first three volumes served as comprehensive field reports; following these reports, a fourth volume was published in six parts between 1948 and 1972 which served as an integrated and synthesized discussion of the mass of information collected in the previous years of excavations. Unfortunately, the complete SCE is not found online and complete hard-copy editions are rare, even for major research libraries.

    The following vols area available online:
    SCE Volume 1 (Text only, Plates missing)
    SCE Volume 2 (Text only, Plates missing)        
    SCE Volume 3 (Text only, Plates missing)                
    SCE Volume 4.2: The Cypro-Geometric, Cypro-Archaic, and Cypro-Classical Periods(Stockholm, 1948)

    Ancient Cyprus: Its Art And Archaeology
    S. Casson (1937)
    Dated survey of Cypriot archaeology from Prehistory through the Iron age, with special interest paid to Cypriot sculpture. Casson was especially interested in sussing out what he saw as a particularly “Cypriot” style (especially in comparison to Greek art) and the impact of foreign models.

    The Cults of the Ancient Greek Cypriots
    C. G. Bennett (UPenn diss, 1980)
    Study of Cypriot religion from the perspective of perceived Greek artistic and religious influence on the island. Discussions/interpretations are somewhat dated and, at times, overly deterministic, but Bennett managed to pull together an impressive data set of images and inscriptions that is still quite useful today.

    Amathonte II. Testimonia 2 : Les sculptures découvertes avant 1975
    A. Hermary (Paris, 1981)

    Publication of limestone sculptures discovered at Amathous, with a contribution by Veronica Tatton-Brown on the Amathous Sarcophagus. Courtesy of École Française d’Athènes.

    Ancient Cyprus
    A. C. Brown and H. Catling (Oxford, 1986)

    Now out-of-print, the text of this important handbook to the Cypriot collections of the Ashmolean is now available on the museum’s web site. Includes a useful survey of Cypriot material culture.

    Footprints in Cyprus: An Illustrated History. Rev. ed.
    D. Hunt et al. (London, 1990)
    A woefully outdated, but to-date not replicated, survey of ancient-modern Cyprus written by a collection of scholars with expertise in each area. Despite its shortcomings and traditional approach (especially for the archaeological chapters), it still remains a useful introduction to the diversity and complexity of the island’s material culture and history.

    Archaische Kalksteinplastik Zypern
    D. G. Mylonas (Mannheim, 1998)
    Full-text (.pdf) of Dimitris G. Mylonas’s Mannheim dissertation on the subject of Cypriot limestone sculpture (ISBN: 3-932178-09-2).

    Amathonte V. Les figurines en terre cuite archaïques et classiques. Les sculptures en pierre
    A. Hermary (Athens, 2000)

    Publication of limestone sculptures excavated after 1975, serves as supplemental to Vol 2.2 (but also includes terracotta sculptures. Courtesy of École Française d’Athènes.
    Note: All excavation volumes from the French at Amathous are available via Persée.

    Ancient Art from Cyprus: The Cesnola Collection in The Metropolitan Museum of Art
    V. Karageorghis, in collaboration with J. R. Mertens and M. Rose (New York, 2000)
    From the blurb: This splendid catalogue is published on the occasion of the opening of the Museum’s four permanent galleries for ancient art from Cyprus. It is also the first scholarly publication since 1914 devoted to the Cesnola Collection (which totals approximately six thousand objects). The volume features some five hundred pieces from the collection, illustrated in superb new color photography. Dating from about 2500 B.C. to about A.D. 300, these works rank among the finest examples of Cypriot art from the prehistoric, Geometric, Archaic, Classical, Hellenistic, and Roman periods. Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

    Prolegomena to the Study of Cypriote Sculpture (Cahiers du Centre d’Etudes Chypriotes. Volume 31, 2001, 129-181).
    Derek B. Counts
    General survey (up to 2000) of Cypriot limestone sculpture with a focus on history of scholarship, chronology and typology, as well as interpretations.

    Ancient Cypriote art in the Musée d’art et d’histoire, Geneva
    V. Karageorghis and J. Chamay (Nicosia, 2004)
    Catalogue of the Museum’s holdings in Cypriot art, which includes an important collection of limestone sculptures. Although access to the entire book is limited, the entries for stone sculpture are available here.

    Classical Sculpture: Catalogue of the Cypriot, Greek, and Roman Stone Sculpture in the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.
    I. B. Romano (Philadelphia, 2006)

    Catalogue of the Museum’s holdings in Classical sculpture, which includes an important collection of Cypriot limestone sculptures. Although access to the entire book is limited, the entries for Cypriot sculpture are available here.

    Ancient Cyprus: Cultures in Dialogue
    D. Pilides and N. Papadimitriou (2012)
    The exhibition ‘Ancient Cyprus: Culture in Dialogue’ was presented in the Royal Museums of Art and History in Brussels from October 2012 until February 2013. It presented an overview of the culture of Cyprus from the earliest human settlement on the island to the end of Antiquity. The exhibition featured ca. 300 ancient objects from 13 museums in Cyprus, Belgium and the UK.

    The Cesnola Collection of Cypriot Art:  Stone Sculpture. 1st Rev ed.
    A. Hermary and J. R. Mertens (New York, 2015)
    Definitive, modern publication of the 635 stone objects within the Met’s Cesnola Collection of Cypriot Art. From my review (here): Hermary and Mertens have produced the new standard handbook for The Met’s limestone sculpture, and, more generally, the catalog will hold an important place in the developing history of Cypriot sculpture studies. Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

    The Cesnola Collection of Cypriot Art:  Terracottas. 1st Rev ed.
    V. Karageorghis, G. S. Merker, and J. R. Mertens (New York, 2018)
    From the blurb: This catalogue, which focuses on Cypriot terracottas, was originally published in 2004 as a CD-ROM, and is now available in a more accessible format. It contains nearly 500 works dating from between about 2000 B.C. and the 2nd century A.D. from one of the most expansive collections of Cypriot art in the world. Illustrations of each object are accompanied by a detailed catalogue entry, including a brief bibliography. In addition, fifteen commentaries make the catalogue a perfect introduction to Cypriot terracottas and the colorful world of ancient life and mythology. Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

    Kyprios Character
    Scientific articles written especially for Kyprios Character by external collaborators pertaining to the history, archaeology and numismatics of ancient Cyprus. Texts, available in Greek and in English, are accompanied by their references, illustrations, a bibliography and a digital location map. Specific topics linked below.

    1. Numismatics
    2. Archaeology
    3. Epigraphy
    4. Kingdoms- Kings
    5. Cyprus and the Others
    6. Cult and Religion
    7. Economy and Trade
    8. Collections of Cypriot Antiquities
    9. Research Projects