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Open Access Journal: Electryone - `Hλεκτρυώνη

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[First posted in AWOL 28 January 2014, updated 21 August 2022]

Electryone - `Hλεκτρυώνη
ISSN: 2241-4061

Electryone is an English-language, peer reviewed online journal devoted to ancient historical and philological issues covering the period between the 2nd and 1st millennia BC  and the Roman period A.D.  Electryone welcomes articles between 4,000 and 8.000 words, shorter notes, responses, etc. up to 2,500 words, and book reviews. It also welcomes presentations of new publications, announcements for conferences and information about research programs.

Electryone focuses on the Mediterranean region and on matters referring to interactions of the Mediterranean with neighboring areas, but presents an international forum of research, innovative interpretations, critical reviews, analyses of ancient text sources, comparative studies, mythological issues, archive research reports, interaction of ancient history with topography and archaeology, and applied new technologies on historical and classical studies.
Electryone covers the full range of classical studies (i.e. 2nd millennium to late Rome) but is particularly interested in classical antiquity and its relationship to other cultures.
Volume 8, Issue 1

 | pp.

28-31

Abstract:

Dio Chrysostom’s Euboicus as a rejection of Greco-Roman urban
civilization1
Ioannis Papadopoulosioannispapadopoulos1987@gmail.com

ELECTRYONE 

2021
Volume 8, Issue 1

 | pp.

19-27

Abstract:

Dio Chrysostom’s Euboicus presents a unique case-study of a divergent voice that disrupts the rather smooth discourse of the urban dimensions of the Second Sophistic. The author, having experienced a rather turbulent period of life, during Domitian’s reign and observed alternative ways of life, unfamiliar with the Greek and Roman examples, produced a manifesto of a new view of social living. The ideas and examples presented in the aforementioned work rather reject some of the fundamental social principles of urban living during Classical Antiquity. The extent that Dio was a visionary of social change or a plain reactionary as a result of his personal calamities remains unclear. However, his treatise, describing a remote community in mountainous Euboea, consists not only of a call to a retreat to a more natural and ‘primitivistic’ way of life, but also includes a sharp criticism of the dominant problems of a Greek city during the imperial era. Through his reflection on such issues, Dio, appeared to have reached the fringes of civil disobedience, inspired by cultural otherness and the resistance to the monolithic Greek and Roman social norms.
‘The Funeral of Sarpedon’ by Constantine P. Cavafy
and Kyriakos Charalambidis: convergences - divergences / similarities –
differences
Louiza Christodoulidouxristod@aegean.gr

ELECTRYONE 

2021
Volume 8, Issue 1

 | pp.

8-18

Abstract:

Our presentation will be structured, mainly, around three axes. At a first level, our interest is focused on the artistic representations of the archaic angiographies that were the reason for the composition of the two poems, the targeting, the connotations and their consequent role. At a second level we will highlight the poetic function of the "Funeral of Sarpedon" by Konstantinos Cavafy and Kyriakos Charalambidis, as well as the convergencesdiscrepancies between them. At a third level, we will detect the contexts, since the conceptualbridges that direct us in an intertextual walk towards the corresponding contexts of the Iliad are scattered, but also in any differences or upheavals that highlight the ideological meanings of each poem.
Euripides’ Ion l.528: an example of comic self-consciousness*
Vasileios Dimoglidisdimoglvs@mail.uc.edu

ELECTRYONE 

2021
Volume 8, Issue 1

 | pp.

1-7

Abstract:

Euripides’ Ion is a play with elements that challenge tragic gravity, and bring about a lighter tone. Although the body of criticism that discusses the comic elements of Euripides’ tragedies (esp. the so-called tragic–comedies) is extensive, little attention has been given to cases of comic self-consciousness. The aim of this paper is to examine Ion’s l.528, and more concretely Ion’s utterance ...ταῦτ᾽ οὖν οὐ γέλως κλύειν ἐμοί;, as an example of comic selfawareness, that is, an instance that Euripides himself recognizes, in a metatheatrical way, as comic, while commenting at the same time on its reception on the audience’s part.
 



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