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Proceedings of the 3rd Meeting of the Association of Ground Stone Tools Research

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edited by Patrick Nørskov Pedersen, Anne Jörgensen-Lindahl, Mikkel Sørrensen and Tobias Richter. Paperback; 203x276mm; 274 pages. 149 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694789. Epublication ISBN 9781789694796.
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Ground Stone Tools and Past Foodways brings together a selection of papers presented at the 3rd meeting of the Association of Ground Stone Tools Research, which was held at the University of Copenhagen in 2019. Ground stone artefacts are one of the most enduring classes of material culture: first used by Palaeolithic gatherer-hunters, they are still used regularly by people in many parts of the world to grind, mash and pulverize plants, meat and minerals. As such, ground stone artefacts provide a well preserved record at the nexus of interaction between humans, plants and animals. The papers in this volume focus especially on the relationship between ground stone artefacts and foodways and include archaeological and ethnographic case studies ranging from the Palaeolithic to the current era, and geographically from Africa to Europe and Asia. They reflect the current state of the art in ground stone tool research and highlight the many ways in which foodways can be studied through holistic examinations of ground stone artefacts.

About the Editors
Patrick Nørskov Pedersen is a PhD-student in Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Copenhagen. His research specializes in ground stone tool technology, currently focusing on the ground stone assemblages from Shubayqa 1 and 6, two late Epipalaeolithic-early Neolithic sites in eastern Jordan. ;

Anne Jörgensen-Lindahl is a PhD student at the department of Cross-Cultural and Regional Studies, University of Copenhagen. Her PhD project researches the chipped stone assemblage from Natufian-PPNA Shubayqa 1 and 6 (Jordan) using micro-wear analysis to understand the role of the tools in terms of food procurement, processing and disposal during the early stages of the transition from hunting-gathering to agriculture in southwest Asia. ;

Mikkel Sørrensen is Associate Professor of prehistoric archaeology at the SAXO Institute, University of Copenhagen. His main areas of research are prehistoric hunter-gatherer societies of northern Europe and the eastern Arctic, climate change research in human science, lithic technology and the chaîne opératoire approach. ;

Tobias Richter is Associate Professor in Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Copenhagen. His research focuses on the material culture, economy, social organisation and development of gatherer-hunter-cultivator-fishers during the late Pleistocene and early Holocene in southwest Asia.

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