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NEW: Contribution of Ceramic Technological Approaches to the Anthropology and Archaeology of Pre- and Protohistoric SocietiesProceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 12 Session IV-3 edited by François Giligny, Ekaterina Dolbunova, Louise Gomart, Alexandre Livingstone Smith and Sophie Méry. Paperback; 205x290mm; 112 pages; 44 figures, 3 tables. 5 papers in French, 2 in English. 729 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697094. £27.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697100. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

The reconstruction of the technical systems of ceramic production and of its ‘chaîne opératoire’ is a means of exploring certain social structures in time and space. For many years, methodological procedures based on multidisciplinarity have made it possible to analyse both materials and methods of fabrication for this purpose. Session IV-3 organised at the 18th Congress of the UISPP in 2018 aimed to highlight the contribution of technological approaches to ceramics, both in archaeology and in ethnology, to the analysis of pre- and protohistoric societies. The case studies focus on the Neolithic and the European Bronze Age, but also on the megalithism of our era in Senegal.

Apport des approaches technologiques de la céramique à l’anthropologie et à l’archéologie des sociétés pré et protohistoriques
La reconstitution des systèmes techniques et des chaînes opératoires de production céramique est un moyen qui permet d’explorer certaines structures sociales dans le temps et l’espace. Depuis de nombreuses années, des procédures méthodologiques basées sur la pluridisciplinarité permettent d’analyser tant les matériaux que les méthodes de façonnage à cette fin. La session IV-3 organisée lors du 18e Congrès de l’UISPP en 2018 avait pour but de mettre en évidence l’apport des approches technologiques de la céramique, tant en archéologie qu’en ethnologie des techniques à l’analyse des sociétés pré et protohistoriques. Les études de cas portent essentiellement sur le Néolithique et l’âge du Bronze européen, mais aussi sur le mégalithisme de notre ère au Sénégal.
NEW: Neolithic and Bronze Age Studies in Europe: From Material Culture to TerritoriesProceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 13 Session I-4 edited by Marie Besse and François Giligny. Paperback; 205x290mm; 104 pages; 37 figures, 13 tables. 728 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697193. £27.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697209. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Neolithic and Bronze Age Studies in Europe: from material culture to territories presents eight papers from the 2018 UISPP Congress. Topics include the neolithisation process in the Iberian Peninsula; faunal exploitation in early Neolithic Italy; the economic and symbolic role of animals in eastern Germany; Copper Age human remains in central Italy; animal figurines; spatula-idols; territories and schematic art in the Iberian Neolithic; and finally Bronze age hoards at a European scale. The diversity of the papers reflects contemporary approaches and questions in those periods.

About the Editors
Marie Besse is Professor of Prehistoric Archaeology at the University of Geneva and is Director of the Laboratory of Prehistoric Archaeology and Anthropology at the same university. ;

François Giligny is Professor of Archaeological Methodology at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University.
NEW: Between the 3rd and 2nd Millennia BC: Exploring Cultural Diversity and Change in Late Prehistoric Communities by Susana Soares Lopes and Sérgio Alexandre Gomes. DOI: 10.32028/9781789699227. Paperback; 205x290mm; 156 pages; 64 figures, 13 tables (colour throughout). 727 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699227. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699234. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Between the 3rd and 2nd Millennia BC: Exploring Cultural Diversity and Change in Late Prehistoric Communities is a collection of studies on the cultural reconfigurations that occurred in western Europe between the 3rd and 2nd millennia BC. It brings together seven texts focusing on the evidence from the West of the Iberian Peninsula, and one on the South of England. The texts have their origin in a landmark meeting held at the University of Coimbra in November 2018, where scholars explored the grand narratives explaining the differences between what are traditionally considered Chalcolithic (or Late Neolithic) and Bronze Age communities. The contributions look at key aspects of these grand narratives through regional perspectives, asking the following questions: is there clear data to support the idea of an intensification of social complexity towards the emergence of the Bronze Age chiefdoms? What is the role of monumental architecture within this process? How do we best discuss the different levels of architectural visibility during this period? How can we interpret collective and individual burials in relation to the emergence of individual/territorial powers? In answering these questions, the papers explore regional diversity and argue that regional specificities resist a general interpretation of the historical process at stake. In light of this resistance, the book emphasizes that cultural singularities only become visible through contextual, medium, or low-scale approaches. The recognition of singularities challenges grand narratives, but also carries the potential to expand our understanding of the changes that occurred during this key moment of Late Prehistory. The book thus offers readers the opportunity to think about the diversity of archaeological evidence in combination with an exploration of the available range of approaches and narratives. The critical intertwining of multiple points of view is necessary, because it gets us closer to how elusive the cultural differences of prehistoric communities can be. This elusive dimension is precisely what can force us to constantly rethink what we see and what questions we ask.

About the Editors
Susana Soares Lopes is a researcher at CEAACP – University of Coimbra (Portugal). She is a retired full professor in archaeology at the University of Porto (Portugal), where she taught from 1975 to 2013. Her research, focusing on the Late Prehistory of the Iberian Peninsula, has explored archaeological sites in northern Portugal by integrating a variety of theoretical orientations. She uses this plurality to promote and discuss different perspectives on Prehistory.

Sérgio Alexandre Gomes is a researcher at CEAACP - University of Coimbra (Portugal). His main interests lie in the history of archaeology, archaeological methods and theories, as well as the study of the Late Prehistory of the Iberian Peninsula, with a focus on the archaeology of wall enclosures and pit sites.
NEW: Earthen Construction TechnologyProceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 11 Session IV-5 edited by Annick Daneels and Maria Torras Freixa. Paperback; 205x290mm; 168 pages; colour throughout. 719 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697230. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697247. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Earthen Construction Technology presents the papers from Session IV-5 of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). The archaeological study of earthen construction has until now focused on typology and conservation, rather than on its anthropological importance. Earth is the permanent building material of humankind, and was used by the world’s earliest civilizations for their first urban programmes. The architectural and engineering know-how required to carry out these monumental achievements can only be obtained through archaeological research: extensive excavations with attention to architectural and structural features, and their collapse, coupled with typological, mineralogical, micromorphological, botanical, chemical, and mechanical studies of building materials. This line of research is recent, starting in the 1980s in Europe, but is rapidly growing and illustrated in this volume.

About the Editors
Annick Daneels, archaeologist, PhD (UGent, Belgium, and UNAM, Mexico), senior researcher at the Institute of Anthropological Research of the National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico City. Since 1981 active in archaeological research in Central Veracruz, on the Mexican Gulf coast, with a focus on monumental earthen architecture since 2004. Director of four interdisciplinary projects on Mesoamerican Earthen Architecture since 2009, including excavations, preservation, experimental archaeology, and mineralogical, chemical, isotopic, botanical (pollen, phytoliths, macroremains), mechanical, and micromorphological analysis of archaeological and experimental construction samples. ;

Maria Torras Freixa, archaeologist, PhD (UB, Spain), independent researcher. Since 2013 active in archaeological research on the formation of premodern cities and urban planning, with a focus on Teotihuacan, in the Central Mexican Highlands. Team member of an interdisciplinary project in Teotihuacan since 2018, including fieldwork and geophysical surveys.
NEW: White Castle: The Evaluation of an Upstanding Prehistoric Enclosure in East Lothian by David Connolly, Murray Cook and Hana Kdolska. Paperback; 203x276mm; 108 pages; 42 figures, 8 tables (colour throughout). 134 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699302. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699319. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

White Castle: The evaluation of an upstanding prehistoric enclosure in East Lothian describes the results of a four year research programme of archaeological works between 2010 and 2013, at the later prehistoric enclosure of White Castle, East Lothian, carried out under the auspices of the Rampart Scotland project. The site is a Scheduled Monument, but, despite being subject of mapping and survey for some 200 years, it has never been examined by excavation prior to the Rampart Scotland project’s interventions. White Castle was the first of the series of comparable sites to be excavated in the Lammermuir area. The programme of archaeological evaluation and sequence of radiometric dates furnished evidence for four major phases of activity at White Castle – with the main enclosure period dating to the second half of the first millennium BC. The excavations demonstrated a clear sequence of enclosure development over time, whereby the design and visual impact often appeared to be more important than defence alone. White Castle’s location on the main route through the Lammermuirs with surrounding upland pasture is also highly suggestive to its function and it seems probable that the site’s economy was concerned primarily with controlling access to grazing. The final phase of the prehistoric enclosure appears to combine two key factors: impressing visitors and stock control. While maintenance of White Castle’s enclosure system was abandoned in the closing centuries BC, it is unlikely that the area was deserted and there is also limited evidence for two later phases of activity on site around the Medieval and Early Modern Periods.

About the Authors:
David Connolly MCIfA, FSA Scot has had a long career in archaeology since 1981. Being one of the pioneers of buildings archaeology, land survey and a qualified drone pilot, he is always at the forefront of developing new techniques of archaeological recording. He is also the creator of the successful Archaeology Skills Passport scheme. Since 1999, David devotes his time to running British Archaeological Jobs Resource (BAJR) and its fieldwork arm, CHC Heritage, participating in varied worldwide commercial and research/training projects, including Rampart Scotland. ;

Dr Murray Cook, MA Hons, MCIfA FSA Scot is Stirling Council’s Archaeologist, an Honorary Research Fellow at Stirling University, as well as teaching a course on Stirling at Forth Valley College. As co-director of Rampart Scotland, he also runs regular training digs and is the author of three popular books on Stirling: The Anvil of Scottish History, Digging into Stirling’s Past and Bannockburn andStirling Bridge: Exploring Scotland’s Two Greatest Battles. ;

Hana Kdolska MA, MSc is a graduate of the University of Edinburgh, gaining practical experience working as a field archaeologist for a number of large commercial units in the UK. As part of Rampart Scotland’s team, she has supervised multiple research excavations across Scotland. Since 2015 she has participated and run archaeological projects in the UK and the Emirate of Ras al-Khaimah (UAE). In 2020, she joined BAJR and CHC Heritage as a co-director.
Sites of Power and Assembly in the Thames Valley in the Middle Ages by Alex Sanmark. DOI: 10.32028/9781789697865-7. Anglo-Saxon Studies in Archaeology and History 22 pp.114-131.ISBN 9781789697865-7. Download Full PDF 

This article examines three sites of elite and royal power in the early second millennium AD in the Thames valley: Kingston upon Thames in Greater London, Westminster in the City of London, and Runnymede in Surrey. Using a backdrop of comparative material from medieval Scandinavia, these sites are examined in terms of their landscape qualities, particularly their liminal nature. On this basis, it is shown that they demonstrate attributes and features that are frequently connected to assembly sites. It is therefore argued that these sites may well, earlier in time, have been assembly locations that were consciously adopted and developed as royal ritual sites as part of the legitimising process of power.
NEW: Garranes: An Early Medieval Royal Site in South-West Ireland by William O’Brien and Nick Hogan. DOI: 10.32028/9781789699197. Hardback; 205x290mm; 402 pages; 376 figures, colour throughout. 722 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699197. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699203. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Ringforts were an important part of the rural settlement landscape of early medieval Ireland (AD 400–1100). While most of those circular enclosures were farmsteads, a small number had special significance as centres of political power and elite residence, also associated with specialized crafts. One such ‘royal site’ was Garranes in the mid-Cork region of south-west Ireland. In 1937, archaeological excavation of a large trivallate ringfort provided evidence of high-status residence during the fifth and sixth centuries AD. The site had workshops for the production of bronze ornaments, with glass and enamel working as well as indications of farming. Pottery and glass vessels imported from the Mediterranean world and Atlantic France were also discovered. That trade with the Late Roman world is significant to understanding the introduction of Christianity and literacy in southern Ireland at that time.

This monograph presents the results of an interdisciplinary project conducted 2011–18, where archaeological survey and excavation, supported by various specialist studies, examined this historic landscape. Garranes is a special place where archaeology, history and legend combine to uncover a minor royal site of the early medieval period. The central ringfort has been identified as Rath Raithleann, the seat of the petty kingdom of Uí Echach Muman, recalled in bardic poetry of the later medieval period. Those poems attribute its foundation to Corc, a King of Munster in the fifth century AD, and link the site closely to Cian, son-in-law of Brian Bóruma, and one of the heroes of Clontarf (AD 1014). This study provides new evidence to connect the location of Rath Raithleann to high-status occupation at Garranes during the fifth and sixth centuries, and explores its legendary associations in later periods.

Includes contributions from Michelle Comber, Ian Doyle, Lenore Fischer, Kevin Kearney, Susan Lyons, Tim Mighall and Douglas Borthwick, Margaret Mannion, Ignacio Montero-Ruiz and Mercedes Murillo-Barroso, Róisín Nic Cnáimhín, Cian Ó Cionnfhaolaidh, James O’Driscoll, Edward O’Riordain, and Orla-Peach Power.

About the Authors
William O'Brien is Professor of Archaeology in University College Cork, Ireland. His research interests include the Chalcolithic and Bronze Age in Ireland, early mining and metallurgy in Atlantic Europe, upland archaeology, the study of hillforts and monumentality in the later prehistoric period. He has a particular interest in the prehistory of south-west Ireland, where he has conducted numerous research excavations. ;

Nick Hogan is a graduate of National University of Ireland Galway, where he completed a BA degree in Archaeology and a MA in Landscape Archaeology. In 2008, he was appointed Technical Officer for the Department of Archaeology in University College Cork, where he is responsible for teaching and support in the areas of archaeological fieldwork and computing. He is an experienced field archaeologist with a range of skills in excavation, land survey and geophysics.
NEW: From Mine to User: Production and Procurement Systems of Siliceous Rocks in the European Neolithic and Bronze AgeProceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 10 Session XXXIII-1&2 edited by Françoise Bostyn, François Giligny and Peter Topping. Paperback; 205x290mm; 150 pages; 71 figures, 7 tables (colour throughout). 718 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697117. £29.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697124. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

From Mine to User: Production and Procurement Systems of Siliceous Rocks in the European Neolithic and Bronze Age presents the papers from Session XXXIII of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). 23 authors contribute nine papers from Parts 1 and 2 of the Session. The first session ‘Siliceous rocks: procurement and distribution systems’ was aimed at analysing one of the central research issues related to mining, i.e. the production systems and the diffusion of mining products. The impact of extraction on the environment, group mobility and the numbers involved in the exploitation phase were considered; mining products were also examined with a view to identifying local and imported/exported products and the underlying social organization relating to the different fields of activity. The second session ‘Flint mines and chipping floors from prehistory to the beginning of the nineteenth century’ focused on knapping activities. The significance of the identification of knapping workshops in the immediate vicinity of mine shafts and of their presence in villages as well as in intermediary places between the two was considered in the analysis of chaîne opératoire sequences. The potential of product quality and artefact distribution to contribute to the understanding of the social organisation of the communities being studied was also examined.
About the Editors
Françoise Bostyn is currently Professor at the University of Paris 1-Panthéon-Sorbonne. She specialises in the European Neolithic and works particularly on lithic industries, from the characterisation of resources and procurement systems, especially from flint mines, to the abandonment of tools within domestic settlements. Through technological and typological approaches, the questions of the organization of production at different scales, the structure of supply and exchange networks, and the emergence of craft specialists are explored from an evolutionary perspective, from the arrival of the first farmers in France until the emergence of the first hierarchical societies. ;

François Giligny has been Professor of Archaeological Methodology at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne University since 2009. Experienced in preventive archaeology, he conducts research and excavations in the Paris basin. He has created and since 2016 has been co-director of two professional master’s degree courses at Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne: Master of Archaeology ‘Archaeological Engineering’ and Master in Heritage and Museums ‘Archaeological Heritage Mediation and Valorisation’. François is Scientific Director of the magazine « Les Nouvelles de l’archéologie » and is engaged in two UISPP Commissions for which he organised the 18th Congress in 2018 in Paris. His research topics include the European Neolithic, ceramic technology, archaeological methodology, digital heritage and digital archaeology. ;

Peter Topping is a Visiting Fellow at Newcastle University. His expertise lies in the analysis of multiperiod landscapes, and his main research interest is the European Neolithic period. Formerly employed by RCHME and English Heritage, he has worked on Neolithic flint mines, causewayed enclosures and the Stonehenge landscape, amongst many others types of site. He has also participated in fieldwork led by the US National Park Service in Ohio and Minnesota, and is currently directing a project on prehistoric quarries in the Northumberland Cheviots, alongside researching European Neolithic mines and quarries for a Prehistoric Society research monograph.
NEW: Rougga I: Le forum et ses abords (fouilles 1971–1974) edited by Maurice Euzennat† and Hédi Slim†. Paperback; 205x290mm; 518 pages; 214 figures, 54 tables (13 colour plates). French text. 706 2020 Archaeology of the Maghreb 2. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698251. £85.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698268. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Located in Byzacena, 12 km south-east of Thysdrus / El Jem, the municipality of Bararus / Henchir, Rougga is known for its large Roman cisterns first reported in the 18th century and for the discovery in 1972 of a hoard of Byzantine gold coins. ROUGGA I gives an account of the overall results of the excavations carried out at the site of the forum, from 1971 to 1974, by the Tunisian-French mission under the direction of Maurice Euzennat † and Hédi Slim †.

Situé en Byzacène, à 12 km au sud-est de Thysdrus/El Jem, le municipe de Bararus/Henchir Rougga est connu pour ses grandes citernes d’époque romaine signalées depuis le XVIIIe s. et pour la découverte en 1972 d’un trésor de monnaies d’or byzantines publié en 1982 dans le volume III de la monographie générale du site. Ce volume I, rédigé pour l’essentiel au début des années 90, rend compte du résultat global des fouilles menées à l’emplacement du forum, de 1971 à 1974, par la mission tuniso-française sous la direction de Maurice Euzennat† et Hédi Slim†. L’ouvrage comprend trois parties : tout d’abord, une présentation générale du site par les deux chefs de mission et Pol Trousset ; ensuite, une description de la stratigraphie du forum et du mobilier qui en provient, par Roger Guéry† avec la collaboration de divers spécialistes ; enfin, une étude architecturale extrêmement précise des différents éléments qui composent le centre monumental de la cité : citernes, platea et portiques, xyste et temples, par Gilbert Hallier†. Ces travaux permettent de mieux appréhender la place du municipe de Bararus au centre d’une riche région agricole qui a laissé les traces de cadastration parmi les mieux conservées d’Afrique. Ils mettent en évidence sa longue durée d’occupation, du IIIe s. av. J.-C. (avec quelques traces antérieures remontant à la Préhistoire) jusqu’au XIe s., et l’originalité des partis architecturaux qui ont présidé à la construction de son centre monumental à l’époque flavienne, ses transformations au IIe s. et son abandon à l’époque byzantine.

Maurice Euzennat (1926-2004), Directeur de Recherche au CNRS, Membre de l’Institut. ;

Hédi Slim (1935-2019), Directeur de Recherche à l’Institut National du Patrimoine de Tunis, Directeur de la division du Recensement général et des Études. ;

Roger Guéry (1926-1997), Ingénieur au CNRS, archéologue-céramologue. ;

Gilbert Hallier (1923-2010), Architecte d.p.l.g., Directeur de Recherche au CNRS, architecte-archéologue. ;

Pol Trousset, Directeur de Recherche honoraire au CNRS, archéologue-géographe.

Préface de Fathi Bejaoui, Directeur de Recherche à INP.

Postface de Pierre Gros, Membre de l'Institut.

Ouvrage publié avec le concours de l'Institut Français de Tunisie et du Programme Investissements d’Avenir, Initiative d’Excellence d’Aix-Marseille Université - A*MIDEX, AMX-MED-012.
NEW: Current Perspectives in Sudanese and Nubian ArchaeologyA Collection of Papers Presented at the 2018 Sudan Studies Research Conference, Cambridge edited by Rennan Lemos and Samantha Tipper. Paperback; 203x276mm; 126 pages; 39 figures, 14 tables. 133 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698978. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698985. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Current Perspectives in Sudanese and Nubian Archaeology brings together papers presented at the 2nd Sudan Studies Research Conference, held at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge. Scholars from various institutions around the world gathered to discuss the most recent trends in the field of Sudanese and Nubian archaeology, ranging from recent fieldwork in Sudan to scientific analysis of material culture and current theoretical approaches. The papers collected here focus on early administrative and mortuary material culture in the Nile valley and adjacent areas; religious beliefs and practices at Kerma; the adoption and local use of imported objects in the New Kingdom colonial period; and the role of Sudan and East Africa in human population history. Together, all papers represent the diversity of current approaches to the archaeology of Sudan and Nubia in various periods.

About the Author
Rennan Lemos is an ERC postdoctoral research fellow at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München. He recently completed his PhD in Egyptian and Sudanese archaeology at the University of Cambridge, specialising in mortuary material culture in New Kingdom Nubia. ;

Samantha Tipper is a senior lecturer at the University of Lincoln. She is a bioarchaeologist and paleopathologist with experience working in both the commercial and academic sectors in human osteology, paleopathology and forensic anthropology.
NEW: Current Research in Egyptology 2019Proceedings of the Twentieth Annual Symposium, University of Alcalá, 17–21 June 2019 edited by Marta Arranz Cárcamo, Raúl Sánchez Casado, Albert Planelles Orozco, Sergio Alarcón Robledo, Jónatan Ortiz García, Patricia Mora Riudavets. Paperback; 203x276mm; 248 pages; 89 figures, 11 tables. 133 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789699074. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789699081. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Current Research in Egyptology 2019 presents the papers and posters from the twentieth meeting of the prestigious international student Egyptology conference, on this occasion held at the University of Alcalá, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, Spain. The conference took place 17–21 June 2019 at the Major College of San Ildefonso, the historic centre of the University of Alcalá, with almost 200 participants from various countries and institutions all over the world. The conference addressed a wide range of topics including all periods of ancient Egyptian History and different aspects of its material culture, archaeology, history, society, religion and language. Fifteen wide-ranging papers are published here with wider information on the scientific and cultural programme of the conference.

About the Editors
Marta Arranz holds a master’s degree in archaeology and heritage from the Autónoma University of Madrid, and she is a doctoral candidate in Egyptology at the University of Alcalá. ;

Raúl Sánchez Casado obtained a PhD in Egyptology at the University of Seville; he is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Granada. ;

Albert Planelles Orozco completed a master´s degree in ancient cultures and languages at the University of Barcelona; he is currently working on his PhD in Assyriology at the University of Alcalá. ;

Sergio Alarcón Robledo holds an MPhil in Egyptology at the University of Cambridge and an MA in archaeology from the University of California, Los Angeles; he is a PhD candidate in Egyptology at Harvard University. ;

Jónatan Ortiz García completed his PhD in Cultural Heritage at the University of Valencia; he is a Juan de la Cierva postdoctoral fellow at the University of Alcalá. ;

Patricia Mora Riudavets completed an MA in Egyptology at the University of Liverpool. She is a professional archaeological photographer.
The house that turned around and the street that wasn’t: A cross-disciplinary study of the metamorphosis of the centre of a small town, c. 1680–1760 by Reidun Marie Aasheim, Finn-Einar Eliassen and Marianne Johansson. Pages 1-12 from ‘For My Descendants and Myself, a Nice and Pleasant Abode’ – Agency, Micro-history and Built Environment edited by Göran Tagesson, Per Cornell, Mark Gardiner, Liz Thomas and Katherine Weikert.Download Full PDF 

This article demonstrates what can be achieved through a close, cross-disciplinary cooperation between historians and archaeologists, combining written and archaeological material in an integrated study. The point is illustrated by a pilot investigation of the medieval trading-place and early modern small town of Son, an important timber-exporting port on the eastern side of the Oslo fjord in the 16th and 17th centuries. The cross-disciplinary approach is especially successful in revealing the development of the centre of Son in the decades around 1700, where a house was seemingly ‘turned around’, and a main street opened up through previously private plots. Also, the infilling of a small bay made it possible to create new plots of land, which eventually became the central market square of the small town. This process could not only be precisely dated, but also the developers were identified, as members of the Solgaard family, Son’s leading merchants, who made great investments in the project. Finally, a strong argument is made for post-medieval archaeology in Norway, where only sites and artefacts older than 1537 are automatically protected by law.
NEW: Searching for the 17th Century on Nevis: The Survey and Excavation of Two Early Plantation Sites by Robert A. Philpott, Roger H. Leech and Elaine L. Morris. Paperback; 205x290mm; 238 pages; 118 figures; 14 tables. 711 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698862. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698879. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Searching for the 17th Century on Nevis is the first of a series of monographs dedicated to the archaeological investigation of the landscape, buildings and artefacts of the Eastern Caribbean by the Nevis Heritage Project. This volume presents the results of documentary research and excavation on two sugar plantation sites on the island of Nevis. Upper Rawlins, located high on Nevis mountain, was occupied in the late 17th and early 18th century and abandoned early. Fenton Hill was occupied from the mid-17th to the mid-19th century and originated with an earthfast timber building, probably a dwelling house, later converted to a kitchen and encapsulated in stone about 1700. The adjacent main house was probably destroyed in the French raid of 1706 and rebuilt in timber. The final occupation was by Portuguese Madeiran labourers, who were introduced to fill a labour force shortage in the 1840s.

Detailed reports on the finds assemblage include discussions of the handmade, bonfired Afro-Caribbean pottery made by enslaved African women, imported European ceramics and glass, clay tobacco pipes, metalwork and building materials. The dominance of imported goods from south-western England demonstrates the strong mercantile links between Nevis and Bristol, but local Nevis production of ceramics adds new insights into the estatebased ceramic production on European lines.

Includes contributions by David Barker, Clive Gamble, Jerzy Gawronski, Sheila Hamilton-Dyer, David A. Higgins, Linda Mitchell, Sebastiaan Ostkamp and Jaco Weinstock.

About the Authors
Dr Robert Philpott MCIfA FSA is a researcher at the University of Liverpool, with interests in post-medieval archaeology of colonial settlement in the Caribbean, material culture and the Roman and later archaeology of North West England. ;

Professor Roger Leech MCIfA FSA, formerly Head of Archaeology for the Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England, now Visiting Professor in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Southampton, has published widely on urban archaeology and architecture, and the historical archaeology of the Caribbean. ;

Dr Elaine L. Morris MCIfA FSA is Visiting Fellow at the University of Southampton (UK) with interests in prehistoric and colonial archaeology in the Caribbean and prehistoric ceramics in Britain.
NEW: Le four de Sévrier et autres fours et fourneaux d’argile aux âges des métaux en Europe occidentale by Jean Coulon. Paperback; 205x290mm; 248 pages; 181 figures, 25 tables. French text. 710 2021 Laboratoire d’archéologie préhistorique UNIGE . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698619. £44.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698626 . Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

The Sevrier kiln, discovered in 1974 on a submerged island in Lake Annecy in the Haute-Savoie region of France, is a headline find of alpine archeology. Almost fifty years later, it continues to provoke debate. This study looks back at the history of an artefact considered in turn as one of the earliest Western pottery kilns, as an enigmatic stove for domestic use, and as a technological link in the Final Bronze Age which would herald the professionalization of pottery, hitherto a purely domestic industry, seasonal and self-sufficient.

It takes the form of a multidisciplinary investigation where archaeological, ethnoarchaeological and experimental approaches are brought together to consider the contradictory hypotheses, broaden the focus and put forward new perspectives.

In particular the study focuses on technological history, and on the changing social structure of Bronze Age communities, which contributed to the advent of proto-artisans specialising in pottery production, a few centuries later.

About the Author
Jean Coulon, archaeologist, teacher, and artist, was born in Annecy in 1952 and is a member of the Laboratory of Prehistoric Archaeology and Anthropology of Geneva. The practical experience acquired during a long practice of ceramics led him naturally to take an interest in this famous discovery from the Alpine lake-dwellings.

French Description
Le four de Sévrier, découvert en 1974 sur un haut fond immergé du lac d’Annecy, est un objet phare de l’archéologie alpine. Près d’une cinquantaine d’années plus tard, il continue de se dérober à l’interprétation des spécialistes. Cette étude revient sur l’histoire d’un artefact considéré tour à tour comme le princeps des fours de potier occidentaux, comme un énigmatique fourneau à usage domestique, comme un maillon technologique de l’âge du bronze fi nal qui annoncerait la professionnalisation de la poterie, activité jusqu’alors familiale, saisonnière et autarcique.

Ce nouveau regard sur cet objet de référence, prend la forme d’une enquête pluridisci-plinaire ou les volets archéométrique, ethnoarchéologique et expérimental accueillent et passent au crible les hypothèses contradictoires, élargissent les problématique s et posent de nouvelles perspectives.

Il interroge par le prisme de l’histoire des techniques, les infl exions dans l’organisation sociale des communautés de l’âge du Bronze. Celles, en particulier, qui favoriseront, quelques siècles plus tard, l’avènement de proto artisans, spécialisés dans les activités de transformation de l’argile.

Jean Coulon, archéologue, enseignant, artiste, né à Annecy en 1952, est titulaire d’un Master en Arts Plastiques de l’Université de St Etienne, d’un doctorat en Langue, Histoire et Civilisation des mondes anciens de l’Université Lyon Lumière 2, membre du Laboratoire d’Archéologie Préhistorique et Anthropologie de Genève. Son parcours est riche d’une grande diversité d’expériences. Celles acquises au cours d’une longue pratique de la céramique l’ont amené tout naturellement à s’intéresser à cet objet célèbre des palafi ttes alpins.
NEW: Göytepe: Neolithic Excavations in the Middle Kura Valley, Azerbaijan edited by Yoshihiro Nishiaki and Farhad Guliyev. Hardback; 210x297mm; 384 pages; 285 figures, 37 tables (colour throughout). 708 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698787. £88.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698794. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Göytepe: Neolithic Excavations in the Middle Kura Valley, Azerbaijan, publishes the first round of fieldwork and research (2008-2013) at this key site for understanding the emergence and development of food-producing communities in the South Caucasus. Situated close to the Fertile Crescent of Southwest Asia, where Neolithisation processes occurred earlier, research in the South Caucasus raises intriguing research questions, including issues of diffusion from the latter and interaction with ‘incoming’ Neolithic communities as well as the possibility of independent local Neolithisation processes. In order to address these issues in the South Caucasus, a joint Azerbaijan–Japan research programme was launched in 2008 to investigate Göytepe, one of the largest known Neolithic mounds in the South Caucasus. The results of the first phase of the project (2008-2013) presented here provide rich archaeological data from multi-disciplinary perspectives: chronology, architecture, technology, social organisation, and plant and animal exploitation, to name a few. This volume is the first to present these details in a single report of the South Caucasian Neolithic site using a high-resolution chronology based on dozens of radiocarbon dates.

About the Editors
Yoshihiro Nishiaki, who received his BA and MA from the University of Tokyo and PhD from University College London, is a professor of prehistoric archaeology at the University of Tokyo and Director of its University Museum. His research involves the prehistory of Southwest Asia and its neighbouring regions through fieldwork and archaeological analyses of material remains. He has directed a number of field campaigns at Palaeolithic and Neolithic sites in Syria, Iran, Azerbaijan, and Uzbekistan. The Neolithisation processes of the South Caucasus have been a major target of his research in the past few decades. ;

Farhad Guliyev, a graduate of the Baku State University of the Republic of Azerbaijan, received his PhD from the Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences (ANAS) and currently serves as Director of the Museum of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, ANAS. His major research interests lie in the socio-economic development of the South Caucasus from the Neolithic to the Bronze Age. His recent international field projects besides Göytepe include the Neolithic sites of Hacı Elamxanlıtepe, Menteshtepe and Kiciktepe, also in western Azerbaijan.
NEW: Discurso, espacio y poder en las religions antiguas edited by Rafael A. Barroso-Romero and José Ángel Castillo Lozano. Paperback; 203x276mm; 212 pages; 12 figures, 1 table; Spanish text. 132 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698848. £34.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698855. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Discurso, espacio y poder en las religiones antiguas aims to reflect on how the wielders of power, be they religious, social or political, shape the discourses that justify their power within the framework of a society or a specific group, and how space participates in these discourses. Intellectuals, aristocrats, holy men or even the dead all needed to shape a discourse that would allow them to justify their hierarchies, whether they were internal or common to all of society, to reach a social consensus and to sustain them over time. The forms in which power used religion to express itself were quite diverse, such as ritual violence, martyrdom, sacrifice, or even divine trickery. Sometimes certain spaces became places whose political and religious control brought about conflicts, whose resolution was found through the legitimisation generated by the complex theological discourse, which reinforced the extraordinary qualities of the gods to reaffirm their authority, or through the cohesive value of the rites. This volume analyses these questions through fourteen works by sixteen researchers from different institutions. It includes studies carried out with materials from a wide range of sources: epigraphy, the archaeological record, and literary sources.

About the Editors
Rafael A. Barroso-Romero is a doctoral researcher at the Max-Weber-Kolleg, Universität Erfürt and at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, where he lectures as a member of the Department of Ancient History. He is currently developing his doctoral research on materiality, spatiality, and the body in unusual burials in the Roman West. ;

José Ángel Castillo Lozano completed his Doctorate in History at the Universidad de Murcia. He is currently a High School teacher. His area of specialisation lies in the world of Late Antiquity, on which he has published around fifteen papers.

Spanish Description
Discurso, espacio y poder en las religiones antiguas pretende reflexionar acerca de cómo el poder da forma a los discursos que lo justifican en el marco de una sociedad o de un grupo concreto y cómo el espacio participa de aquellos. Intelectuales, aristócratas, hombres santos o incluso los difuntos, todos ellos necesitaron configurar un discurso que permitiera justificar sus jerarquías −ya fueran internas o comunes a toda la sociedad− consensuarlas socialmente y sustentarlas en el tiempo. Las formas en las que el poder utilizaba a la religión para expresarse fueron muy diversas, como la violencia ritual, el martirio, el sacrificio, o incluso el engaño divino. A veces, determinados espacios se convirtieron en lugares cuyo control político y religioso generaba conflictos, cuya solución se encontró en la legitimación generada por el complejo discurso teológico, que refuerza las cualidades extraordinarias de los dioses para reafirmar su autoridad, o por el valor cohesivo de los ritos. Este volumen analiza tales cuestiones a través de catorce trabajos de dieciséis investigadores procedentes de diversos centros. Recoge investigaciones realizadas con materiales de muy diversa procedencia: la epigrafía, el registro arqueológico o las fuentes literarias.

Rafael A. Barroso-Romero es Graduado en Historia (UCO) y Máster en Ciencias de las Religiones (UCM). Actualmente es investigador predoctoral en el Max-Weber-Kolleg (IGS “Resonant Self- World Relations in Ancient and Modern Socio-Religious Practices”) de la Universität Erfürt y al mismo tiempo en la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, donde imparte docencia como miembro del Departamento de Prehistoria, Historia Antigua y Arqueología. ;

José A. Castillo-Lozano (1991) es graduado en Historia en la Universidad de Murcia. En la actualidad es profesor de secundaria (funcionario de carrera) y doctor en historia. Su ámbito de especialización radica en el mundo de la Antigüedad Tardía del cual ha publicado un
NEW: Professor Challenger and his Lost Neolithic World: The Compelling Story of Alexander Thom and British Archaeoastronomy by Euan W. MacKie†. Paperback; 203x276mm; 158 pages; 81 figures (colour throughout). 131 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784918330. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918347. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Professor Challenger and his Lost Neolithic World combines the two great passions of the author’s life: reconstructing the Neolithic mind and constructively challenging consensus in his professional domain. The book is semi-autobiographical, charting the author’s investigation of Alexander Thom’s theories, in particular regarding the alignment of prehistoric monuments in the landscape, across a number of key Neolithic sites from Kintraw to Stonehenge and finally Orkney. It maps his own perspective of the changing reception to Thom’s ideas by the archaeological profession from initial curiosity and acceptance to increasing scepticism. The text presents historical summaries of the various strands of evidence from key Neolithic sites across the UK and Ireland with the compelling evidence from the Ness of Brodgar added as an appendix in final justification of his approach to the subject.

About the AuthorEuan W. MacKie (1936-2020), was a British archaeologist who graduated with a degree in Archaeology and Anthropology from St John’s College, Cambridge in 1959. He excavated at the Mayan site of Xunantunich in 1959-60 and was then employed at the British Museum Department of Ethnography before becoming Curator and Keeper of Archaeology and Anthropology at the Hunterian Museum at the University of Glasgow where he later obtained his PhD. His principal research areas were the brochs and vitrified forts of the Scottish Iron Age, and archaeoastronomy – the investigation of the astronomical knowledge of prehistoric cultures.

Reviews
'History matters, and this comprehensive volume sheds light not just on the particular period covered but on how its legacy lives on in colouring our view of archaeoastronomy today.'—Liz Henty, British Archaeology, May 2021
NEW:“Los animales enseñaron el camino…”: La fauna de la Sierra Gorda queretana a través de sus representaciones cerámicas arqueológicas by María Teresa Muñoz Espinosa and José Carlos Castañeda Reyes. Paperback; 203x276mm; 94 pages; colour throughout. 130 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698596. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698602. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

“Los animales enseñaron el camino…”: La fauna de la Sierra Gorda queretana a través de sus representaciones cerámicas arqueológicas examines the past fauna of the Sierra Gorda region of Mexico, and its representation in archaeological ceramics. Queretaro's Sierra Gorda was declared a “Biosphere Reserve” on May 19, 1997, by presidential decree. As a natural area thus protected, there are almost 400,000 hectares of great biodiversity, in which there are at least 15 types and subtypes of different vegetation, more than 1800 species of plants, 124 of fungi and 550 species of vertebrates, among other elements that prove the natural wealth of the region. As part of the "Northern Archaeological Project of the State of Querétaro, Mexico" (PANQ), the book presents ceramic representations of the fauna of the region, relating them to the oral traditions that the inhabitants of the region have preserved until now. In so doing it demonstrates the deep interdependence of humans and animals, and analyses wider cultural interconnections across Mesoamerica. The book goes on to analyze some of these Mesoamerican cultural traits, although its main goal is to highlight the archaeological evidence that has been recovered by the project since 1990 in this still little-known region of ancient Mexico.

About the Authors
María Teresa Muñoz Espinosa is Professor of Archaeology at the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia. Since 1990 she has led the Proyecto Arqueológico Norte del Estado de Querétaro, and has published extensively on the region. ;

José Carlos Castañeda-Reyes, a historian and archaeologist, is Professor at the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana campus Iztapalapa.

Spanish Description:“Los animales enseñaron el camino…” La fauna de la Sierra Gorda queretana a través de sus representaciones cerámicas arqueológicas by María Teresa Muñoz Espinosa and José Carlos Castañeda Reyes La Sierra Gorda queretana fue declarada “Reserva de la Biosfera” el 19 de mayo de 1997, por decreto presidencial. Como área natural así protegida, son casi 400 000 hectáreas de gran biodiversidad, en las que habitan al menos 15 tipos y subtipos de vegetación diferente, más de 1800 especies de plantas, 124 de hongos y 550 especies de vertebrados, entre otros elementos que comprueban la riqueza natural de la región. Como parte del desarrollo del “Proyecto Arqueológico del Norte del Estado de Querétaro, México” (PANQ), hemos localizado diversos testimonios que muestran ejemplos de la fauna del pasado, que además forma parte de algunas tradiciones orales que conservan los habitantes de la región hasta nuestros días. En el libro analizamos algunos de estos rasgos culturales mesoamericanos, si bien nos interesa resaltar primordialmente los testimonios arqueológicos que se han recuperado por el proyecto que desde 1990 viene desarrollándose en esta región, todavía poco conocida, del México antiguo.

María Teresa Muñoz Espinosa. Arqueóloga. Egresada de la Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia (Licenciatura en Arqueología) y de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (Maestría en Historia del Arte y Doctorado en Estudios Mesoamericanos). Candidata al grado de Doctor en estudios Mesoamericanos por la UNAM. Profesor-Investigador de tiempo completo de la Dirección de Estudios Arqueológicos del INAH. Directora del Proyecto Arqueológico Norte del Estado de Querétaro, México, desde 1990. ;

Jose Carlos Castañeda Reyes. Mexicano. Historiador y arqueólogo. Egresado de la Escuela Normal Superior de México, de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México y de la Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia. Estudios de Maestría y Doctorado en Estudios de Asia y Africa, especialidad Medio Oriente (Historia antigua) por El Colegio de México. Profesor-investigador en el Departamento de Filosofía. Area de Historia del Estado y de la Sociedad, Universidad Autónoma Metr
NEW: Heritage in the Making: Dealing with the Legacies of Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany edited by Flaminia Bartolini. Paperback; 210x297mm; 158 pages; colour throughout. 5 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698732. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

The fifth volume of Ex Novo has the pleasure to host Flaminia Bartolini as guest editor for the special issue titled Heritage in the Making. Dealing with Legacies of Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany. This collection of peer-reviewed papers stems in part from the successful workshop held at McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge in December 2018 under the aegis of the DAAD-Cambridge Hub. The event gathered several international heritage experts and professionals from both Germany and Italy to explore the complexities of handling Heritage related to Fascism and National Socialism.

The selection of papers contribute much to the debate on the shifting conditions of the reception of dictatorial regimes, and more specifically the fate of fascist material legacies from the aftermath of WWII to the present day.

The second part of this volume includes an additional contribution by Aydin Abar which keeps in with the broad theme of political reappropriation of the past lying at the core of Bartolini’s collection of papers but strays away from their geographical focus by extending the analysis to the exploitation of Achaemenian material legacies in reinforcing nationalist narratives in nineteenth and twentieth century Iran.
Luxury tableware? Terra sigillata in the coastal region of the northern NetherlandsPages 94-110 from Experiencing the Frontier and the Frontier of Experience: Barbarian perspectives and Roman strategies to deal with new threats edited by Alexander Rubel and Hans-Ulrich Voß by Annet Nieuwhof. DOI: 10.32028/9781789696813-8.ISBN 9781789696813-8. Download Full PDF 

With thousands of finds, Roman terra sigillata (TS) is a common find category in terp settlements of the Northern Netherlands. It is traditionally interpreted as luxury tableware of the local elites, who acquired it through their contacts with Romans, or who were able to buy it from traders who came to this area with their merchandise. This paper questions that interpretation. The reason is that the far majority of TS is found as sherds, which, despite their good recognisability, only rarely fit other sherds. Moreover, many of these sherds are worked or used in some way. They were made into pendants, spindle whorls and playing counters, or show traces of deliberate breakage and of use for unknown purposes. Such traces are found on 70–80% of the sherds. The meaning of TS hence seems to have been symbolic rather than functional. Rather than as luxury tableware, TS may have been valued for the sake of the material itself, and may have been imported as sherds rather than as complete vessels. A symbolic value also shows from its long-term use. Used or worked TS sherds from the 2nd and 3rd century AD are often found in finds assemblages that may be interpreted as ritual deposits, not only from the Roman Period but also from the early Middle Ages. There are striking parallels for such use in early modern colonial contexts. TS sherds may have been part of the diplomatic gifts by which the Romans attempted to keep peace north of the limes, or may even have been payments for local products. These sherds might thus be comparable to the trade beads of early-modern European colonial traders.

Keywords
Northern Netherlands; terra sigillata; Roman colonialism; indigenous people; secondary use; exchange.
Mobility and Exchange across Borders: Exploring Social Processes in Europe during the First Millennium BCE – Theoretical and Methodological ApproachesProceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 9, Sessions XXXIV-4 and XXXIV-5 edited by Veronica Cicolani. Paperback; 205x290mm; 144 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. Papers in English and French. 707 2021. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697292. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697308. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Mobility and Exchange across Borders presents the proceedings of Sessions XXXIVIV and XXXIV-V of the 18th UISPP World Congress (Paris, June 2018). Over the last few decades, the study of cultural interactions in the Iron Age has been considerably renewed thanks to the application of new methods and tools, opening the way to new research perspectives. The papers provide different examples from various archaeological contexts and regions while applying new methodologies able to highlight the diversity of cultural transfers. Their purpose is to stimulate a debate on human interactions and cultural transfers in order to open up new analytical perspectives on this topic and to critically examine the markers and approaches traditionally used to identify human and object mobility during the first millennium BC. Through the different approaches and perspectives presented herein, this volume aims to contribute to the renewal of the scientific debate on mobility and interactions as important drivers of societal change and to stimulate future research and debate.

About the editor
Veronica Cicolani is a permanent researcher at the CNRS French Institute, AOrOc UMR8546 CNRS-PSL and member of editorial team of Etudes Celtiques. Archaeologist specialist of European protohistory, and of the history of museum collections, her research focuses on technological and cultural interactions between the Italic and Celtic worlds and on Italic craft practices. Since 2005, she has been a scientific collaborator of the National Museum of Saint-Germain-en-Laye (MAN), where she also co-curated the Golasecca French exhibition (2009-2010). She has been involved in international research programmes on Celtic-Italic interactions (DFG Die sitzbanck of Hochdorf, ANR Caecina) and led a French-Italian research program on Ligurian bronze craft production (Labex Archimede 2015-2016). During the past few years, she has been exploring new inter-disciplinary approaches to the study of cultural and technological interactions between the Italic and Celtic worlds.
Bronze Age Tell Communities in Context: An Exploration into Culture, Society, and the Study of European Prehistory. Part 2Practice – The Social, Space, and Materiality by Tobias L. Kienlin. Paperback; 210x297mm; 250 pages; 169 figures (colour throughout). 697 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697506. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697513. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Practice – The Social, Space, and Materiality forms the second part of Bronze Age Tell Communities in Context: An exploration into culture, society, and the study of European prehistory. It studies Bronze Age tells and our approaches towards an understanding of this fascinating way of life, drawing on the material remains of long-term architectural stability and references back to ancestral place. While the first volume challenged Neo-Diffusionist models of the influence of Mediterranean palatial centres on the development of tell communities in the Carpathians and an attendant focus on social stratification, the second part sets out an alternative theoretical approach, which foregrounds architecture and the social use of space. Unlike the reductionist macro perspective of mainstream social modelling, inspired by aspects of practice theory outlined in this book, the account given seeks to allow for what is truly remarkable about these sites, and what we can infer from them about the way of life they once framed and enabled. The stability seen on tells, and their apparent lack of change on a macro scale, are specific features of the social field, in a given region and for a specific period of time. Both stability and change are contingent upon specific historical contexts, including traditional practices, their material setting and human intentionality. They are not an inherent, given property of this or that ‘type’ of society or social structure. For our tells, it is argued here, underneath the specific manifestation of sociality maintained, we clearly do see social practices and corresponding material arrangements being negotiated and adjusted. Echoing the argument laid out in the first part of this study, it is suggested that archaeology should take an interest in such processes on the micro scale, rather than succumb to the temptation of neat macro history and great narratives existing aloof from the material remains of past lives.

About the Author
Tobias L. Kienlin is professor of Prehistoric Archaeology at the University of Cologne, Germany. His research interests include the European Neolithic, Copper and Bronze Ages, settlement archaeology, archaeological theory, social archaeology, material culture studies and archaeometallurgy. Current projects include BORBAS (Borsod Region Bronze Age Settlement) on Early Bronze Age tell sites in north-eastern Hungary and the Toboliu project in north-western Romania.
L’arte rupestre nella penisola e nelle isole italiane: rapporti tra rocce incise e dipinte, simboli, aree montane e viabilitàRock art in the Italian peninsula and islands: issues about the relation between engraved and painted rocks, symbols, mountain areas and paths edited by Francesco M. P. Carrera, Renata Grifoni Cremonesi and Anna Maria Tosatti. Paperback; 203x276mm; 484 pages; colour illustrations throughout. 129 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698237. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698244. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

L’arte rupestre nella penisola e nelle isole italiane presents the proceedings of IFRAO 2018 – Session 2H: Rock Art in the Italian Peninsula and Islands: Issues about the Relation between Engraved and Painted Rocks, Symbols, Mountain Areas and Paths. The various papers present a remarkable synthesis of current knowledge on inscriptions, engraved and painted, on the rock walls of the Italian peninsular. In recent years an increasing amount of data has been collected, characterized by a regional and peculiar iconography with some common elements: anthropomorphic figures, weapons, daggers, halberds and other several symbols, all stylised. A peculiarity of this research is the site’s locations within small shelters, inappropriate for habitation or in places suitable for supervising mountain and territory roads; this research demonstrates similarities to that carried out in the Western Mediterranean Sea. A new subject of relates to the possible interpretations of some engravings as solar and stellar symbols related to the measuring of time and to economic, daily and seasonal factors.

L’ouvrage «Art rupestre de la Péninsule italienne, de la Sicile, de la Sardaigne et de la Corse» qui publie les actes du 20ème Congrès International « Rock Art Congres IFRAO 2018 », dont les différentes communications ont été réunies par Francesco Carrera, Renata Grifoni Cremonesi et Anna Maria Tosatti, présente une remarquable synthèse des connaissances actuelles sur les inscriptions gravées et peintes sur les parois rocheuses des régions prises en compte. Le plus souvent très schématiques, difficilement datables, elles correspondent soit à des pictogrammes qui évoquent des objets de la vie courante, soit à des idéogrammes qui transmettent des idées liées à la pensée symbolique des peuples protohistoriques qui les ont réalisées. Quelques articles sont consacrés aux cupules creusées sur des roches en plein air pour récupérer l’eau de pluie, d’autres à des rainures très profondes qui correspondent à des “polissoirs”. – Henry de Lumley - Institut de Paléontologie Humaine, Paris
Offa's Dyke Journal: Volume 2 for 2020 edited by Howard Williams and Liam Delaney. Paperback; 176x250mm; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 2 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698527. £35.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

As the first and only open-access peer-reviewed academic journal about the landscapes, monuments and material culture of frontiers and borderlands in deep-time historical perspective, the Offa’s Dyke Journal (ODJ) has a concerted focus on the Anglo-Welsh borderlands given its sponsorship from the University of Chester and the Offa’s Dyke Association in support of the Offa’s Dyke Collaboratory. Yet ODJ also provides a venue for original research on frontiers and borderlands in broader and comparative perspective. While Offa’s Dyke and Wat’s Dyke remain key foci, the contents of volumes 1 and 2 together illustrate the wider themes, debates and investigations encapsulated by ODJ concerning boundaries and barriers, edges and peripheries, from prehistory through to recent times, as well as considerations of the public archaeology and heritage of frontiers and borderlands.

Table of Contents
Collaboratory, Coronavirus and the Colonial Countryside – Howard Williams ;
Two Chimeras in the Landscape – Mark Bell ;
The ‘Wall of Severus’: Pseudoarchaeology and the West Mercian Dykes – Keith Fitzpatrick-Matthews ;
Saxon Kent versus Roman London? Presenting Borderland Heritage at the Faesten Dic in Joyden’s Wood, Kent – Ethan Doyle White ;
Living after Offa: Place-Names and Social Memory in the Welsh Marches – Howard Williams ;
Offa’s and Wat’s Dykes – David Hill ;
Grim’s Ditch, Wansdyke, and the Ancient Highways of England: Linear Monuments and Political Control – Tim Malim
Nothing but tombs and towers? Results of the Al-Mudhaybi Regional Survey 2019 by Stephanie Döpper & Conrad Schmidt. Pages 157-169 from Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 50 2020 edited by Daniel Eddisford. PSAS. Download Full PDF 

Sites with towers in eastern Arabia have been interpreted as regional centres of the Early Bronze Age. One of those sites is Al-Khashbah in central Oman. Until now, however, nothing was known about its hinterland that would support the idea of a regional centre. The Al-Mudhaybi Regional Survey was therefore initiated in order, for the first time, to provide comprehensive and detailed knowledge of this third-millennium BC landscape. This paper presents the results of the remote sensing and ground truthing of potential features in the 2019 field season. Nearly 4000 archaeological structures ranging from the Neolithic to the modern era have been positively identified. Interestingly, some periods such as the Hafit and Wadi Suq were abundantly present, while the Umm an-Nar and Late Bronze Age were almost totally missing. It is also important to note that, except for the possible Hafit-period tower at Al-Fath, no Bronze Age settlement sites were found. The reasons behind this pattern remain to be discovered.
Bronze Age microliths at Saruq al-Hadid, Dubai by Mark W. Moore, Lloyd Weeks, Charlotte M. Cable, Yaaqoub Youssef Al-Ali, Mansour Boraik & Hassan Zein. Pages 149-166 from Stone Tools of Prehistoric Arabia: Papers from the Special Session of the Seminar for Arabian Studies held on 21 July 2019 edited by K. Bretzke, R. Crassard and Y.H. Hilbert. PSAS. Download Full PDF 

Excavations at Saruq al-Hadid, Dubai, have recovered a large assemblage of stone artefacts, including backed microliths, from a dense midden of animal bone deposited during the mid-second millennium BC. Stoneworkers at Saruq al-Hadid combined simple core reduction methods with sophisticated backing techniques to produce the microliths. Unstandardized flake blanks were backed directly, or were truncated into segments which were subsequently backed. The final stage of backing was carefully controlled and was probably accomplished using a pressure technique; the backed surface on many microliths is distinctively domed in profile. Most microliths are asymmetrical in shape and many display a distinctive scalene triangle morphology. The microliths probably functioned as armatures for arrows, although other functions are possible. Here we contextualize microlith production at Saruq al-Hadid through a review of late prehistoric microlith traditions in south-eastern Arabia and neighbouring regions of Asia and Africa. This raises intriguing but unresolved issues related to preceding technological traditions, cultural connections, and group identity.
Archaeology Today: A Colouring Book by Cornelius Holtorf and Daniel Lindskog. Paperback; 210x297mm; 16 pages; black & white throughout. 704 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698190. £4.99 (No VAT). Download Full PDF  Buy Now

This colouring book offers a short introduction to the world of the contemporary archaeologist, exploring new approaches and theories of investigation. With text by professional archaeologist Cornelius Holtorf and beautiful, highly detailed illustrations by archaeologically trained professional illustrator Daniel Lindskog, each page is full of information to explore, and designs to colour.

About the Contributors
Cornelius Holtorf is Professor of Archaeology at Linnaeus University in Sweden. ;

Daniel Lindskog is a professional illustrator with a degree in archaeology.
Travelling the Korosko Road: Archaeological Exploration in Sudan’s Eastern Desert edited by W. Vivian Davies and Derek A. Welsby. Hardback; 205x290mm; 252 pages; 493 plates, 74 figures (colour throughout). 688 2020 Sudan Archaeological Research Society Publication 24. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698039. £60.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698046. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

This volume publishes accounts of archaeological exploration carried out during the last 30 years or so in the Sudanese Eastern Desert. It is divided into two related parts.

The first and foremost covers results from the work of the Centro Ricerche sul Deserto Orientale (CeRDO), which is based at Varese in northern Italy. Between 1989 and 2006, CeRDO, directed by the brothers Alfredo and Angelo Castiglioni, ran a pioneering programme of expeditions, which traversed the so-called ‘Korosko Road’ (the main desert route connecting Egypt and Sudan) and followed multiple other tracks throughout the Eastern Desert. They encountered in the process a rich archaeological landscape, hundreds of previously undocumented sites, many frequented over millennia, prominent among them gold-production areas and their associated settlements. The CeRDO record, the photographic database, the material retrieved, to which several of the papers published here are devoted, are now all the more valuable, in that many of these sites have since been badly disturbed and some entirely destroyed by recent goldmining activities.

The second part, introduced by a concise account of the historical usage of the Korosko Road, reports in full on a single, short season of documentation, organized in 2013 under the auspices, and with the support, of the Sudan Archaeological Research Society. Its main aim was detailed recording of a group of pharaonic rock-inscriptions discovered by CeRDO expeditions, most located along the Korosko Road and almost all related to the colonial gold-working industry. The project included also a degree of investigation and mapping of the wider context, as well as the recording and study of associated archaeological material, in particular of ceramic remains. The results complement and usefully extend in part those of CeRDO.
Conversations in Human Evolution: Volume 1 edited by Lucy Timbrell. Paperback; 203x276mm; 124 pages; illustrated throughout in colour. 128 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695854. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695861. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Conversations in Human Evolution is an ongoing science communication initiative seeking to explore the breadth and interdisciplinarity of human evolution studies. This volume reports twenty interviews (referred to as ‘conversations’ as they are informal in style) with scholars at the forefront of human evolution research, covering the broad scientific themes of quaternary and archaeological science, Palaeolithic archaeology, biological anthropology and palaeoanthropology, primatology and evolutionary anthropology and evolutionary genetics. This project features academics at various different stages in their careers and from all over the world; in this volume alone, researchers are based at institutions in seven different countries (namely the United Kingdom, Australia, the United States of America, Germany, Denmark, India, and China), covering four continents.

Having arisen at the start of the COVID19 pandemic, Conversations in Human Evolution aims to encourage engagement with both human evolutionary studies and the broader socio-political issues that persist within academia, the latter of which is particularly pertinent during this time of global uncertainty. The conversations delve deeply into the study of our species’ evolutionary history through the lens of each sub-discipline, as well as detailing some of the most current advances in research, theory and methods. Overall, Conversations in Human Evolution seeks to bridge the gap between the research and researcher through contextualisation of the science with personal experience and historical reflection.

About the Editor
Lucy Timbrell is an AHRC-funded PhD researcher in the Archaeology of Human Origins Research Group at the University of Liverpool. Broadly, she is interested in the evolution of modern human diversity, with her doctoral research focussing on quantifying the population structure of early Homo sapiens in Late-Middle Pleistocene Africa. Alongside her PhD research, she organises the widely-known University of Liverpool Evolutionary Anthropology seminar series.
New Frontiers in Archaeology: Proceedings of the Cambridge Annual Student Archaeology Conference 2019 edited by Kyra Kaercher, Monique Arntz, Nancy Bomentre, Xosé L. Hermoso-Buxán, Kevin Kay, Sabrina Ki, Ruairidh Macleod, Helena Muñoz-Mojado, Lucy Timbrell and Izzy Wisher. Paperback; 203x276mm; 308 pages; illustrated throughout (83 pages of colour). Print RRP: £48.00. 127 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697940. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697957. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

This volume is the result of the Cambridge Annual Student Archaeology Conference (CASA), held at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research from September 13–15, 2019. CASA developed out of the Annual Student Archaeology Conference, first held in 2013, which was formed by students at Cambridge, Oxford, Durham and York. In 2017, Cambridge became the home of the conference and the name was changed accordingly. The conference was developed to give students (from undergraduate to PhD candidates) in archaeology and related fields the chance to present their research to a broad audience.

The theme for the 2019 conference was New Frontiers in Archaeology and this volume presents papers from a wide range of topics such as new geographical areas of research, using museum collections and legacy data, new ways to teach archaeology and new scientific or theoretic paradigms. From hunting and gathering in the Neolithic to the return of artefacts to Turkey, the papers contained within show a great variety in both geography and chronology. Discussions revolve around access to data, the role of excavation in today’s archaeology, the role of local communities in archaeological interpretation and how we can ask new questions of old data. This volume presents 18 papers arranged in the six sessions with the two posters in their thematic sessions.
Knossos and Heraklion in the Byzantine-Islamic transition (late 7th – mid-10th century): An archaeological perspective into shifting patterns of settlement ruralisation and urbanisation on medieval CreteTaken from Journal of Greek Archaeology Volume 5, 2020 edited by John Bintliff (Ed. in Chief). Pages 448-467.Download Full PDF 

By Matteo G. Randazzo

In January 2019, the colloquium entitled ‘The Medieval Countryside: An Archaeological Perspective’ was held in San Diego, gathering among some of the most prominent scholars working on the Medieval rural landscape across the Aegean and Anatolia.1 Recent projects of field-surveys and landscape archaeology focusing on these regions, in fact, have played a fundamental role in improving the understanding of rural settlement patterns and forms of habitation and land use during the Middle Ages.2 Discussion, moreover, has touched upon some academic flaws and obstacles to interdisciplinary approaches, especially emphasising the persisting marginal impact of these survey projects, and their rich datasets of material evidence, in existing historiographical narratives and sociocultural reconstructions of the Medieval countryside in these regions.
Definición y caracterización de las cerámicas a mano con decoración pintada del sur de la península ibérica en época tartésica by Pedro Miguel Naranjo. Paperback; 203x276mm; 476 page; 136 figures; illustrated catalogue consisting of 99 colour plates. Spanish text. 682 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697728. £70.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697735. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Handmade ceramics with painted decoration constitute one of the most outstanding archaeological materials from the Late Bronze Age and the First Iron Age in the Guadalquivir and Guadiana valleys, the context in which the Tartessian culture developed. In this work, an exhaustive study of these ceramic styles has been attempted, defining their technical characteristics, dispersion, forms, decoration, symbolism, chronology, use and meaning. To this overall study are added several unpublished pieces by Alarcos, some with archeometric and content analysis, the results of which allow questioning their traditional consideration as 'post-firing ceramics'.

This characterization allows an orientation in the classification of some styles traditionally considered as a monolithic set when really, there is a much more complex panorama due to different chronological and cultural circumstances. Among the latter, the relationships and contacts established between local communities and Mediterranean populations stand out, giving rise to cultural phenomena of miscegenation or hybridization in which local tradition was combined with all exogenous contributions, a fossilized reality in these productions. This book presents the most complete and up-to-date work on these ceramics, studied from the perspective of new theoretical-methodological approaches and recent interpretations.

About the Author
Pedro Miguel Naranjo has a degree in History (Extraordinary Award) and a doctorate in Prehistory from the University of Castilla-La Mancha (UCLM). He completed a master's degree in History and Ancient Sciences (UCM-UAM), specializing in oriental cultures. His research focuses on the Protohistory of the Iberian Peninsula, specifically the Phoenicians, Tartessians and Greeks.

Spanish Description
Las cerámicas a mano con decoración pintada constituyen uno de los materiales arqueológicos más destacados del Bronce Final y de la Primera Edad del Hierro en los valles del Guadalquivir y del Guadiana, contexto en el que se desarrolló la cultura tartésica. En este trabajo se ha abordado un estudio exhaustivo sobre estos estilos cerámicos, definiendo sus características técnicas, dispersión geográfica, formas, decoración, simbolismo, cronología, uso y significado. A este estudio de conjunto se añaden varias piezas inéditas de Alarcos, algunas con análisis arqueométricos y de contenido cuyos resultados cuestionan su tradicional consideración como “cerámicas postcocción”.

Dicha caracterización permite una orientación en la clasificación de unos estilos tradicionalmente considerados como un conjunto monolítico, cuando realmente subyace un panorama mucho más complejo que obedece a diversas circunstancias cronológicas y culturales. Entre estas últimas destacan las relaciones y contactos establecidos entre las comunidades locales peninsulares y las poblaciones mediterráneas, dando lugar a fenómenos culturales de mestizaje o hibridación en el que se conjugó la tradición local con todas las aportaciones exógenas, una realidad fosilizada en estas producciones. En definitiva, se trata de la obra de conjunto más completa y actualizada sobre estas cerámicas, estudiadas desde la perspectiva de los nuevos enfoques teórico-metodológicos y las recientes interpretaciones.

Pedro Miguel Naranjo es graduado en Historia (premio Extraordinario Fin de Carrera) y doctor en Prehistoria por la Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (UCLM). Realizó el máster en Historia y Ciencias de la Antigüedad (UCM-UAM), con especialidad en culturas orientales. Sus investigaciones se centran en la Protohistoria de la península ibérica, concretamente fenicios, tartesios y griegos.
Die Bestattungsgruben in Bat by Conrad Schmidt, with contributions by Stefan Giese und Christian Hübner and Steve Zäuner. Hardback; 210x297mm; 374pp; 250 figures; 187 tables (97 pages of colour). German text. 680 2020 Arabia Orientalis: Studien zur Archäologie Ostarabiens 1. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697391. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697858. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Volume 1 of the series Arabia Orientalis presents the first comprehensive study of two Umm an-Nar (2700—2000 BC) burial pits from the UNESCO World Heritage site Bat in the Sultanate of Oman. They were excavated between 2010 and 2012 by the University of Tübingen. Each burial pit represents one of the largest closed finds of the Early Bronze Age in the region. Finds largely include beads and other items of personal adornment, as well as pottery and human bones. Detailed typologies of all objects are the basis for in-depth statistical analyses of the different categories of finds and the reconstruction of burial customs at Bat. Furthermore, imports and imitations from other regions including the Indus Valley, Iran, and Mesopotamia illuminate Bat’s foreign relations and integration into the interregional exchange and communication system. The interpretation of the unearthed human remains conducted by Steve Zauner offer, not only the number of individuals, sex, and age of the deceased, but also insights into lifestyle, diseases, and stress of the people in the past.

German description
Die Umm an-Nar-Zeit (2700–2000 v. Chr.) auf der östlichen Arabischen Halbinsel gilt als Periode tiefgreifender Veränderungen in der ökonomischen und sozialen Organisation der Gesellschaft sowie der Ausbeutung von Ressourcen. Einer der größten und bedeutendsten Fundplätze dieser Zeit im Sultanat Oman ist der seit 1988 auf der Welterbeliste der UNESCO stehende Fundort Bat in der Provinz Al-Dhahirah. Von 2010 bis 2015 führte die Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen ein Projekt zur Erforschung der Entwicklung der beiden Nekropolen von Bat und Al-Ayn sowie der Siedlung von Al-Zebah durch. Im Mittelpunkt der Untersuchungen stand die Frage nach den Gründen und Ursachen des sozioökonomischen Umbruchs im 3. Jahrtausend v. Chr. und wie sich dieser in den Lebensverhältnissen der damaligen Bevölkerung widerspiegelt.

Die vorliegende Publikation stellt den ersten Band der Endberichte des Forschungsprojekts des Instituts für die Kulturen des Alten Orients der Universität Tübingen in Bat, Al-Zebah und Al- Ayn dar. Das Werk beinhaltet die vollständige Auswertung der beiden Umm an-Nar-zeitlichen Bestattungsgruben A-Inst. 0006 und A-Inst. 0025 in Bat einschließlich anthropologischer Analysen und einer geophysikalischen Prospektion in der Nekropole von Bat. Beide Gruben zählen zu den größten jemals im Oman untersuchten geschlossenen Fundkontexten der frühen Bronzezeit. Zur Publikation gehört ein online unter https://tinyurl. com/9781789697391-der-fundekatalog publizierter Katalog, der sämtliche Einzelnachweise zu den Funden aus den beiden Bestattungsgruben enthält.
An Educator's Handbook for Teaching about the Ancient World edited by Pınar Durgun. Paperback; 156x234mm; 248 pages; illustrated throughout in colour. 670 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697605. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697612. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

With the right methods, studying the ancient world can be as engaging as it is informative. Many K-12 teachers, university instructors, and museum educators use hands-on, project-based, and experiential activities in their classes to increase student engagement and learning. This book aims to bring together such pedagogical methods and teaching activities about the ancient world for any educator to use. The teaching activities in this book are designed in a cookbook format so that educators can replicate these teaching "recipes” (which include materials, budget, preparation time, levels of students) in their ancient art, archaeology, social studies, and history classes. They can be implemented online or in-person, in schools, universities, libraries, museums, or at home. Find out more about the book and the contributors here.

About the Editor
Pınar Durgun is an art historically-trained archaeologist with a background in anthropology, cultural heritage, and museums, passionate about outreach and education. She received her Ph.D. from Brown University and has been teaching for about a decade in universities, museums, and school classrooms about archaeology and the ancient world. As a dedicated public scholar and educator, Dr. Durgun hopes to make academic information about the ancient world accessible, fun, and inclusive.
Public Archaeologies of Frontiers and Borderlands edited by Kieran Gleave, Howard Williams and Pauline Clarke. Paperback; 203x276mm; 270 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 126 . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789698015. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789698022. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

From IndyRef and Brexit to the Refugee Crisis and Trump’s Wall, the construction and maintenance, subversion and traversing of frontiers and borderlands dominate our current affairs. Yet, while archaeologists have long participated in exploring frontiers and borderlands, their public archaeology has been starkly neglected. Incorporating the select proceedings of the 4th University of Chester Archaeology Student conference hosted by the Grosvenor Museum, Chester, on 20 March 2019, this is the first book to investigate realworld ancient and modern frontier works, the significance of graffiti, material culture, monuments and wall-building, as well as fictional representations of borders and walls in the arts, as public archaeology. Key themes include the heritage interpretation for linear monuments, public archaeology in past and contemporary frontiers and borderlands, and archaeology’s interactions with mural practices in politics, popular culture and the contemporary landscape. Together, the contributors show the necessity of developing critical public archaeologies of frontiers and borderlands.

About the Editors
Kieran Gleave is currently an archaeologist with the University of Salford. He graduated from the University of Chester in 2019 after graduating with a BA (Hons) Archaeology degree. ;

Howard Williams is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Chester and researches public archaeology and archaeologies of death and memory. He writes an academic blog: Archaeodeath. ;

Pauline Magdalene Clarke is a postgraduate researcher at the University of Chester, having recently completed both her BA (Hons) and MA there. She has a particular interest in material culture, and how it can demonstrate change (or not) in borderlands in the Anglo-Saxon period. She has recently published a review of the PAS finds from Cheshire for that period.

Reviews
'With libraries closed and bookshops closing down, there has never been a better time for open access books like this one that can be downloaded for free from publishers' websites. Its origins in a student conference at the University of Chester are obvious and admirable: there are several excellent papers by students including Fisher on the archaeology of homelessness and Clarke on Playmobil-based public engagement.'—Gabriel Moshenska, British Archaeology, No. 176
El Palacio: Historiography and new perspectives on a pre-Tarascan city of northern Michoacán, Mexico edited by Marion Forest. Paperback; 203x276mm; 314 pages; 143 figures, 52 tables; papers in English and Spanish. 125 2020 Paris Monographs in American Archaeology 53. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697964. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697971. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

In the centuries that preceded the European conquest in 1521, the central-northern region of the state of Michoacán, West Mexico, was a place of significant socio-political changes materialized by important transformations of settlement pattern and material culture. The archaeological site of El Palacio (also known as La Crucita or Mich. 23), located in the Zacapu Basin, constituted a major center throughout these regional events. The site has been mentioned in the archaeological literature as early as the end of the nineteenth century, and dispersed subsequent research has documented changes in site morphology, function, and degree of integration into interregional networks of cultural interaction. The present volume offers the first monographic publication about El Palacio. It is composed of a series of eleven contributions looking at both legacy and archive data (1896–1995) and results derived from recent archaeological investigations (2012–2017). The systematic review and analysis of the chrono-stratigraphy, material culture, urbanism, and economic and ritual practices at the site yields critical information that allows discussion of the role of El Palacio and the context of its development at both local and extra-local scales, between A.D. 850 and 1521. Beyond this central concern, this volume provides extended material for cultural comparisons with West, Northwest and Central Mexico during this time period, as well as for broader discussions about the complex social mechanisms involved in the rise, transformation, and fall of premodern urban centers.

About the Editor
Marion Forest received her PhD in archaeology from the University Paris 1 Pantheon Sorbonne and is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Anthropology of Brigham Young University. She specializes in urbanization processes in western and central Mexico. Her current research includes a survey and excavation field project at Teotihuacan and further developments in the integration of LiDAR data in archaeology.

Spanish Description
En los siglos que precedieron a la conquista española de 1521, la región centro-norte del estado de Michoacán, occidente de México, fue el escenario de cambios sociopolíticos importantes, materializados a través de transformaciones significativas en el patrón de asentamiento y la cultura material a escala regional. El sitio arqueológico de El Palacio (también conocido como La Crucita o Mich. 23), localizado en la cuenca de Zacapu, constituye un centro mayor que fue ocupado entre 850 y 1521 d. C y transformado de manera continua a lo largo de su historia ocupacional. El Palacio atrajo la atención de diversos investigadores desde finales del siglo diecinueve y fue sujeto a investigaciones subsecuentes. Si bien las intervenciones en el sitio fueron dispersas, éstas permitieron documentar ciertos cambios en la morfología del asentamiento, su función, y su grado de integración en las redes de interacción culturales a larga distancia. El presente volumen constituye la primera publicación monográfica sobre El Palacio. Se compone de once contribuciones enfocadas tanto en la reevaluación de la información existente del sitio (obtenida entre los años 1896 y 1995) como en el estudio de los datos adquiridos durante las investigaciones recientes (de 2012 a 2017). La revisión y análisis sistemático de la cronoestratigrafía, la cultura material, el urbanismo, y las prácticas rituales y económicas que caracterizan la ocupación prehispánica del sitio, produjeron una documentación que permite discutir el papel de El Palacio y su contexto de desarrollo en una escala local y regional. El presente volumen ofrece, asimismo, un contenido con material extensivo útil para ser retomado en estudios comparativos, sobre todo con respecto a las regiones Oeste, Noroeste y Central de México durante los periodos Epiclásico y Postclásico. Finalmente esta obra contribuye a generar una reflexión en tor
Architecture militaire du Deccan: Une réponse défensive face à la guerre moderneDeccan Military Architecture: A response to early modern warfare by Nicolas Morelle. Paperback; 203x276mm; 428pp; 168 figures. French text with English introduction and conclusion. 124 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697445. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697452. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Architecture militaire du Deccan focuses on the Deccan region in central India between the medieval and modern period, a period at the interface between local Indian culture and the Persian world, followed by relations with the colonial enterprise European in Asia. This period was marked by many conflicts, but also by an inventive adaptation of new military technologies in response to new forms of modern warfare in India, with the arrival of artillery.

Using the most recent investigative techniques, such as photogrammetry and 3D modeling, this volume presents a wealth of new data. The author’s meticulous approach encompasses the study of urban maps, architectural plans and detailed descriptions of walls, bastions, moats, towers, gates, horsemen, granaries, hydraulic éléments, and more.

Through the study of four representative fortified sites, the author synthesizes the evolution of the military architecture of the Deccan.

One can only hope that this volume will inspire other scholars to work on other Indian fortified sites, not limited to the Deccan. Thus, a more complete understanding of the phases of evolution of Indian military architecture can emerge.

About the Author
Nicolas Morelle is an archaeologist, specialising in India (associated researcher of LA3M CNRS in France). After studies on crusaders fortifications and influences between East and West in terms of building techniques and military Architecture, he studied technical interactions in Indian fortifications as part of his PhD thesis on the evolution of Military Architecture in the four Deccan forts. In this context, he collaborated with many Indian and international institutions.

French description: L’extraordinaire conservatoire de fortifications que constitue l’Inde centrale enrichit la connaissance de l’architecture militaire de la période moderne. Les spécificités indiennes en matière de défense constituent un apport non négligeable sur le développement original des organes défensifs du Deccan.

En utilisant les techniques d’investigation les plus récentes, telles que la photogrammétrie et la modélisation 3D, Nicolas Morelle découvre une richesse de données jusqu’alors inconnues. Il présente ainsi une approche méticuleuse à travers des cartes urbaines, des plans d’architecture et des descriptions détaillées de murs, bastions, douves, tours, portes, cavaliers, greniers, éléments hydrauliques, …

Dans ce volume, Nicolas Morelle se concentre sur la région du Deccan dans le centre de l’Inde entre la période médiévale et moderne, période à l’interface entre la culture indienne locale et le monde persan, suivi des relations avec l’entreprise coloniale européenne en Asie. Cette période a été marquée par de nombreux conflits, mais aussi par une adaptation inventive, de nouvelles technologies militaires en réponse aux nouvelles formes de guerre moderne en Inde, avec l’arrivée de l’artillerie.

A travers l’étude de quatre sites fortifiés représentatifs, l’auteur élabore une synthèse de l’évolution de l’architecture militaire du Deccan.

On ne peut qu’espérer que le présent volume inspirera d’autres chercheurs à travailler sur d’autres sites fortifiés indiens, sans se limiter au Deccan. Ainsi, une compréhension plus complète des phases d’évolution de l’architecture militaire indienne pourra émerger.

Tiré d’une recherche doctorale récente, cet ouvrage est en français. Plusieurs parties sont traduites en anglais, dont la synthèse, afin d’améliorer sa diffusion vers le public international.

Nicolas Morelle est archéologue, spécialiste de l’Inde (chercheur associé du LA3M CNRS en France). Après des études sur les fortifications des croisades et les influences entre Orient et Occident dans l’architecture militaire, il a étudié les interactions techniques dans les fortifications indiennes dans le cadre de sa thèse de doctorat sur
Nel regno del fango: speleoarcheologia della Grotta di Polla (Salerno, Italia)Risultati delle prime campagne di scavo edited by Antonella Minelli and Sandra Guglielmi. Paperback; 203x276mm; 114 pages; 61 figures, colour throughout. Italian text. 123 . Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789691221. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789691238. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Nel regno del fango presents the preliminary results of the archaeological excavations recently carried out in the Grotta di Polla, in the province of Salerno, in the Vallo di Diano area. Speleoarchaeological researches in recent years have revealed the considerable difficulty of operating methodologically in an environment, such as that of a cave which, in addition to being often characterized by the limitations caused by the darkness and tightness of the environments, has in this case led to the presence of a considerable amount of mud which made researches even more complex. The methodologies adopted for the preservation and conservation of archaeological materials and the results obtained are therefore illustrated. From an interpretative point of view, the cave is configured as an area that has been exploited with a certain continuity from the Neolithic to the whole Bronze Age with the specific function of a burial area.

About the Editors
Antonella Minelli is an academic researcher in the scientific field of Evolutionary Anthropology (BIO/08), at the Department of Humanities, Social and Formation Sciences of the University of Molise. ;

Sandra Guglielmi is a researcher in Physical Anthropology (BIO/08), at the Department of Humanities, Social and Formation Sciences of the University of Molise.

Italian Description
Il volume presenta i risultati preliminari degli scavi archeologici effettuati nella Grotta di Polla, ubicata in provincia di Salerno, nel territorio del Vallo di Diano, in Italia meridionale.

La grotta si configura come un’area sfruttata con una certa continuità, dal Neolitico finale a tutta l’Età del Bronzo, con la specifica funzione di area sepolcrale. Le informazioni acquisite nel corso delle ricerche e degli studi di natura archeostratigrafica, paleobiologica, archeobotanica, hanno permesso di tracciare un quadro significativo ed esaustivo delle modalità di sfruttamento del contesto ipogeico, inserendosi a pieno nei modelli comportamentali noti, per il periodo considerato, in Italia centro-meridionale.

Nel volume sono illustrate le metodologie adottate per la preservazione e la conservazione dei materiali archeologici. I risultati ottenuti sono - dunque - di un certo rilevo nonostante la notevole difficoltà di operare metodologicamente in un ambiente, come quello di grotta che, oltre a dover fare i conti con i limiti dovuti all’oscurità e all’ampiezza degli ambienti, è caratterizzato in questo caso da una considerevole quantità di fango, che ha reso le ricerche ancora più complesse.

Antonella Minelli è ricercatore confermato nel settore scientifico disciplinare di Antropologia, presso il Dipartimento di Scienze Umanistiche, Sociali e della Formazione dell’Università degli Studi del Molise. Ha lavorato come responsabile scientifico in contesti pre-protostorici in grotta e in open-air site in Italia e in Europa ed è stata direttore e collaboratore scientifico delle missioni archeologiche finanziate dal Ministero degli Affari Esteri italiano in Colombia e Paraguay. È autrice di diverse pubblicazioni. ;

Sandra Guglielmi è ricercatore a tempo determinato in Antropologia Fisica, presso il Dipartimento di Scienze Umanistiche, Sociali e della Formazione dell’Università degli Studi del Molise. L’area disciplinare della sua attività di ricerca è l’Antropologia Fisica e Biomolecolare applicata ai campioni archeologici. Ha svolto attività scientifica in diversi ambiti archeologici, da contesti protostorici a contesti storici, in Italia e in Sud America. È autrice di diverse pubblicazioni.
Picenum and the Ager Gallicus at the Dawn of the Roman Conquest edited by Federica Boschi, Enrico Giorgi, Frank Vermeulen. Paperback; 203x276mm, 230 pages; 96 figures (colour throughout). 121 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696998. £42.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697001. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Picenum and the Ager Gallicus at the Dawn of the Roman Conquest: Landscape Archaeology and Material Culture is a coherent collection of papers presented at an International Workshop held in Ravenna (Italy) on 13-14 May 2019. The event, organized by the Universities of Bologna and Ghent and Arcadria, focussed on the transition between Italic culture and Romanised society in the central Adriatic area – the regions ager Gallicus and Picenum under Roman dominance – from the fourth to the second centuries BCE.

By bringing together the experience of international research on this topic, the volume highlights a period that marks a profound transformation in the whole of central Italy by analysing the relationships between the central settlements and their territories and, more generally, by measuring the impact of early Romanization on the territorial structure, social organization and cultural substrata of populations living here. The volume also discusses methodological aspects regarding best practices in fieldwork, landscape investigation and study of material culture, identifying research lines and perspectives for the future deepening of knowledge in this crucial period of central Adriatic archaeology.

About the Editors
Federica Boschi is senior researcher in Methods of Archaeological Research at the University of Bologna. She specialises in non-destructive methods of investigation, in particular geophysics and aerial photography for archaeology. She directs field projects in central Adriatic Italy and is a member of several teams conducting research of international significance. ;

Enrico Giorgi is Associate Professor of Methodology and Landscape Archaeology at the University of Bologna. He is the director of the journal ‘Groma: Documenting Archaeology’ and directs research on Adriatic archaeology. He conducts archaeological missions in Croatia, Albania and Egypt which are already the subject of publications. ;

Frank Vermeulen has been Professor of Roman Archaeology and Archaeological Methodology at Ghent University since 1999 and directed its Department of Archaeology from 2015-2018. He is particularly interested in Roman settlement archaeology and geo-archaeological approaches to ancient Mediterranean landscapes; he has a keen interest in IT applications in archaeology.
Ages and Abilities: The Stages of Childhood and their Social Recognition in Prehistoric Europe and Beyond edited by Katharina Rebay-Salisbury and Doris Pany-Kucera. Paperback; 176x252mm; 264 pages; illustrated throughout. 681 2020 Childhood in the Past Monograph Series 9. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697681. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697698. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Ages and Abilities explores social responses to childhood stages from the late Neolithic to Classical Antiquity in Central Europe and the Mediterranean and includes cross-cultural comparison to expand the theoretical and methodological framework. By comparing osteological and archaeological evidence, as well as integrating images and texts, authors consider whether childhood age classes are archaeologically recognizable, at which approximated ages transitions took place, whether they are gradual or abrupt and different for girls and boys. Age transitions may be marked by celebrations and rituals; cultural accentuation of developmental stages may be reflected by inclusion or exclusion at cemeteries, by objects associated with childhood such as feeding vessels and toys, and gradual access to adult material culture. Access to tools, weapons and status symbols, as well as children’s agency, rank and social status, are recurrent themes. The volume accounts for the variability in how a range of chronologically and geographically diverse communities perceived children and childhood, and at the same time, discloses universal trends in child development in the (pre-)historic past.

About the Editors
Katharina Rebay-Salisbury is an archaeologist with a research focus on the European Bronze and Iron Ages. She directs the research group ‘Prehistoric Identities’ at the Institute for Oriental and European Archaeology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and teaches at the University of Vienna. ;

Doris Pany-Kucera studied biological anthropology at the University of Vienna, focusing on muscle marks and joint changes on skeletal remains to reconstruct occupational stress and labour patterns (PhD 2015). She teaches at the Universities of Vienna and Pilsen.

Reviews
'...the volume fills a gap in the childhood archaeology literature and gives new archaeological perspectives on children's social status, a topic that remains understudied.'—Melie Le Roy, Current World Archaeology, April/May 2021
Networks and Monumentality in the PacificProceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 7 Session XXXVIII edited by Aymeric Hermann, Frédérique Valentin, Christophe Sand, Emilie Nolet. Paperback; 205x290mm; 104 pages; illutsrated throughout. 678 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697155. £22.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697162. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Sessions XXXVIII-1,2 of UISPP 2018 in Paris were dedicated to monumental constructions and to complex exchange networks in the Pacific. Both topics have been extensively commented on and described by indigenous experts, explorers, missionaries, and scholars over the last two centuries, however these have been made famous only for the most impressive examples such as the moai statues of Rapa Nui (Easter Island) or the kula exchange system of the Trobriand Islands. Some of the latest research on these key aspects of Pacific islands societies are made available in this volume to researchers focusing on the region, but also to a more global scientific community and to the general public. The volume reflects the tremendous progress made in Pacific island archaeology in the last 60 years which has considerably advanced our knowledge of early Pacific island societies, the rise of traditional cultural systems, and their later historical developments from European contact onwards. Interdisciplinarity is particularly stimulating in the Pacific region, where the study of the archaeological record and of chronological sequences are often combined with other kinds of information such as ethnohistorical accounts, oral traditions, and linguistic reconstructions, in the French tradition of ethnoarchéologie and the American tradition of historical anthropology.

About the Editors
Aymeric Hermann is a post-doctoral researcher at the Max-Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany. Since 2010, he has directed archaeological projects in several archipelagos of French Polynesia as well as in central Vanuatu. ;

Frédérique Valentin is a researcher in Oceanic archaeology at CNRS (UMR 7041, MSH Mondes, Nanterre, France). She specialises in funerary archaeology and biological anthropology. ;

Christophe Sand is Head Archaeologist for the New Caledonia Government at the IRD Research Centre in Nouméa, working on Southern Melanesia, Western Polynesia and Western Micronesia. ;

Emilie Nolet is an Assistant Professor in Archaeology at the University Paris I, Panthéon-Sorbonne.
El cerro de Alarcos (Ciudad Real): Formación y desarrollo de un oppidum ibérico20 años de excavaciones arqueológicas en el Sector III by Mª del Rosario García Huerta, Francisco Javier Morales Hervás and David Rodríguez González. Paperback; 203x276mm; 160 pages; 64 figures, 13 tables (colour throughout). 671 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696912. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696929. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

El cerro de Alarcos (Ciudad Real): Formación y desarrollo de un oppidum ibérico presents the results of archaeological work which has been carried out since 1997 in so-called Sector III of the Alarcos site, located on a hill next to the Guadiana river, a few kilometres from Ciudad Real. These archaeological campaigns have made it possible to obtain essential information to understand the communities that, from the end of the Bronze Age to the end of the Iron Age, inhabited this large town and its surrounding area.

An interesting set of structures and other evidence of material culture have been recovered, which allow us to characterize the daily activities of people between the 10th-11th century BC and, in addition, they enable us to understand the paleoenvironment of this territory and the nature of the economy and the food transformation activities of these protohistoric populations.

The use of this territory has been determined over the centuries, being originally a residential area which later, in Iberian times, assumed economic functionality, as it was intended for grain storage, grinding and cooking food.

The documentation of a wide and varied repertoire of ceramic materials and an interesting set of foreign ceramics corroborates the dynamism this settlement achieved, during both the Pre-Iberian period and the full Iberian period.

About the Authors
Mª del Rosario García Huerta holds a PhD in Prehistory and is Senior Lecturer on this subject at the University of Castilla-La Mancha. ;

Francisco Javier Morales Hervás was awarded an extraordinary prize during his bachelor's degree and holds a PhD in History from the University of Castilla-La Mancha, where he is Associate Lecturer in Prehistory. ;

. David Rodríguez González is Lecturer in Prehistory at the University of Castilla-La Mancha, where he also coordinates the Degree in History and is a member of the Governing Council. ;

Spanish Description
El objeto de este libro es dar a conocer los trabajos de investigación arqueológica que desde 1997 se han realizado en el denominado Sector III del yacimiento de Alarcos, ubicado en un cerro situado junto al río Guadiana, a pocos kilómetros de Ciudad Real. Estas campañas arqueológicas han permitido obtener una información esencial para poder conocer a las comunidades que, desde finales de la Edad del Bronce hasta finales de la Edad del Hierro, habitaron este gran poblado y su área circundante.

Se ha logrado recuperar un interesante conjunto de estructuras y otras evidencias de la cultura material, que permiten caracterizar las actividades cotidianas que desempeñaban estas personas entre el siglo X a.C. y el II a.C. y, además, nos posibilitan realizar una aproximación al paleoambiente de este territorio y a las características de la economía y de las actividades de transformación de alimentos de estas poblaciones protohistóricas.

Se ha determinado su uso a lo largo de los siglos, siendo en origen un área residencial que posteriormente, en época ibérica, asumió una funcionalidad económica al estar destinada al almacenamiento de grano, a molienda y cocción de alimentos.

La documentación de un amplio y variado repertorio de materiales cerámicos y de un interesante conjunto de cerámicas foráneas corrobora el dinamismo que alcanzará este asentamiento, tanto en época Preibérica como durante el Ibérico pleno.

Mª del Rosario García Huerta es doctora en Prehistoria y profesora titular de esta materia en la Universidad de Castilla- La Mancha. Sus líneas de investigación se han centrado en las culturas protohistóricas de la península ibérica, celtibérica e ibérica y, más recientemente, ha iniciado el estudio del simbolismo animal en la Prehistoria. Es investigadora principal de numerosos proyectos de investigación arqueológicos y autora de un gran número de libros
The Global Connections of Gandhāran ArtProceedings of the Third International Workshop of the Gandhāra Connections Project, University of Oxford, 18th-19th March, 2019 edited by Wannaporn Rienjang and Peter Stewart. DOI: 10.32028/9781789696950; Paperback; 203x276mm; 276 pages; illustrated throughout. 669 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696950. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696967. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Gandhāran art is often regarded as the epitome of cultural exchange in antiquity. The ancient region of Gandhāra, centred on what is now the northern tip of Pakistan, has been called the ‘crossroads of Asia’. The Buddhist art produced in and around this area in the first few centuries AD exhibits extraordinary connections with other traditions across Asia and as far as the Mediterranean. Since the nineteenth century, the Graeco-Roman associations of Gandhāran art have attracted particular attention. Classically educated soldiers and administrators of that era were astonished by the uncanny resemblance of many works of Gandhāran sculpture to Greek and Roman art made thousands of miles to the west. More than a century later we can recognize that the Gandhāran artists’ appropriation of classical iconography and styles was diverse and extensive, but the explanation of this ‘influence’ remains puzzling and elusive. The Gandhāra Connections project at the University of Oxford’s Classical Art Research Centre was initiated principally to cast new light on this old problem.

This volume is the third set of proceedings of the project’s annual workshop, and the first to address directly the question of cross-cultural influence on and by Gandhāran art. The contributors wrestle with old controversies, particularly the notion that Gandhāran art is a legacy of Hellenistic Greek rule in Central Asia and the growing consensus around the important role of the Roman Empire in shaping it. But they also seek to present a more complex and expansive view of the networks in which Gandhāra was embedded. Adopting a global perspective on the subject, they examine aspects of Gandhāra’s connections both within and beyond South Asia and Central Asia, including the profound influence which Gandhāran art itself had on the development of Buddhist art in China and India.

About the Editors
Wannaporn Rienjang obtained her doctorate in Archaeology from University of Cambridge. She is now Lecturer in Archaeology, Museum and Heritage Studies at the Faculty of Sociology and Anthropology, Thammasat University and a project consultant for the Gandhāra Connections Project at the Classical Art Research Centre, Oxford. Her research focuses on the art and archaeology of Greater Gandhāra, Indian Ocean Trade and ancient working technologies of stone beads and vessels. ;

Peter Stewart is Director of the Classical Art Research Centre and Associate Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford. He has worked widely in the field of ancient sculpture. His publications include Statues in Roman Society: Representation and Response (2003) and The Social History of Roman Art (2008). Much of his research concerns the relationship between Gandhāran a
The Changing Landscapes of Rome’s Northern HinterlandThe British School at Rome’s Tiber Valley Project by Helen Patterson, Robert Witcher and Helga Di Giuseppe. Paperback; 205x290mm; 372 pages; 131 figures, 21 tables (colour throughout). 665 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 70. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696158. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696165. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

The Changing Landscapes of Rome’s Northern Hinterland presents a new regional history of the middle Tiber valley as a lens through which to view the emergence and transformation of the city of Rome from 1000 BC to AD 1000. Setting the ancient city within the context of its immediate territory, the authors reveal the diverse and enduring links between the metropolis and its hinterland. At the heart of the volume is a detailed consideration of the results of a complete restudy of the pioneering South Etruria Survey (c. 1955–1970), one of the earliest and most influential Mediterranean landscape projects. Between 1998 and 2002, an international team based at the British School at Rome conducted a comprehensive restudy of the material and documentary archive generated by the South Etruria Survey. The results were supplemented with a number of other published and unpublished sources of archaeological evidence to create a database of around 5000 sites across southern Etruria and the Sabina Tiberina, extending in date from the Bronze Age, through the Etruscan/Sabine, Republican and imperial periods, to the middle ages. Analysis and discussion of these data have appeared in a series of interim articles published over the past two decades; the present volume offers a final synthesis of the project results.

The chapters include the first detailed assessment of the field methods of the South Etruria Survey, an extended discussion of the use of archaeological legacy data, and new insights into the social and economic connectivities between Rome and the communities of its northern hinterland across two millennia. The volume as a whole demonstrates how the archaeological evidence generated by landscape surveys can be used to rewrite narrative histories, even those based on cities as familiar as ancient Rome.

Includes contributions by Martin Millett, Simon Keay and Christopher Smith, and a preface by Andrew Wallace-Hadrill.

About the Authors
Helen Patterson is the former Assistant Director (Archaeology) of the British School at Rome and director of the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project (1998–2002). She is a specialist in the archaeology of the late antique and early medieval periods, with particular interests in ceramic production and distribution. She has published a series of edited volumes including Bridging the Tiber (2004), Mercator Placidissimus (with F. Coarelli, 2008) and Veii: the historical topography of the ancient city (with R. Cascino & H. Di Giuseppe, 2012).

Robert Witcher is Associate Professor of Archaeology at Durham University, UK. From 1999 to 2002, he was a researcher on the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project based at the British School in Rome. His research interests include landscape archaeology with a particular focus on the pre-Roman and Roman periods in Italy and the wider Mediterranean. He has published on aspects of ancient rural settlement, agriculture, demography and globalization. He is the editor of the world archaeology journal, Antiquity.

Helga Di Giuseppe specialises in Italian archaeology with particular interests in the classical and late antique periods. She has published widely on ancient landscape, Roman villas, and ceramic and textile production, and has edited several major excavation and conference volumes. From 1998 to 2002, she was a researcher on the Leverhulme-funded Tiber Valley Project based at the British School in Rome. She is currently project manager for Fasti Online with the International Association of Classical Archaeology and editorial manager with the publisher Scienze e Lettere.
Foragers in the middle Limpopo Valley: Trade, Place-making, and Social Complexity by Tim Forssman. Paperback; 203x276mm; 140 pages; 54 figures, 13 tables (colour throughout). 122 2020 Cambridge Monographs in African Archaeology 100. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696851. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696868. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Between the last centuries BC and the early second millennium AD, central southern Africa witnessed massive social change. Several landscapes hosted a variety of socio-political developments that led to the establishment of state-level society at Mapungubwe, c. 1220 AD in the middle Limpopo Valley. These different landscapes were connected through various forms of circuitry, including social, political, economic and topographic networks. While most often these systems and developments are discussed in the context of farmer societies, local forager communities also saw associated shifts. They were present from before the arrival of farmers and not only witnessed but also participated in local systems leading to the appearance of complex society. Despite numerous studies in the valley, this has not been explored; generally, forager involvement in socio-political developments has been ignored and only farmer sequences have been considered. However, from the early first millennium AD, foragers themselves transformed their own society. Changes have been noted in settlement patterns, craft production, trade relations, social interactions, wealth accumulation, and status. Moreover, these changes occurred unevenly across the landscape; at different forager sites, different responses to shifting social networks have been recorded. When viewed together, the spectrum of change suggests that valley foragers developed social complexity.

About the Author
Tim Forssman is a senior lecturer at the University of Pretoria. Previously, he managed a dam development mitigation project in Lesotho and was a postdoctoral reader at the Universities of the Witwatersrand and Pretoria. His research interests include forager-farmer interactions, forager economies, trade dynamics, landscape archaeology, and rock art.

Reviews
'In summary, Forssman’s book provides new knowledge of and ideas about hunter-gatherers in the Limpopo Valley during the last 3000 years. His work opens many new avenues for research that I hope will attract students and researchers in the years to come.'—Iris Guillemard, Azania, January 2021
Journal of Hellenistic Pottery and Material Culture Volume 4 2019 edited by Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom and Patricia Kögler. Paperback; 210x297mm; 204 pp; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 4 2019. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697841. £30.00 (No VAT). Institutional Price £50.00 (No VAT). Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

JHP is an independent learned journal dedicated to the research of ceramics and objects of daily use of the Hellenistic period in the Mediterranean region and beyond. It aims at bringing together archaeologists, historians, philologists, numismatists and scholars of related disciplines engaged in the research of the Hellenistic heritage.

ARTICLES ;
Understanding the Jal el-Bahr Storage-Jar Assemblage – Donald T. Ariel ;
Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeologica Project: Excavations at Pyla-Vigla in 2019 – Justin Stephens, Brandon R. Olson, Thomas Landvatter & R. Scott Moore ;
A Hellenistic Farmhouse at the Entrance to the Town of El’ad – All Nagorsky ;
Cave 169 at Marisa: The Imported Ptolemaic Red Ware – Renate Rosenthal-Heginbottom ;
Lissos in Illyria: Two Centuries of Hellenistic Pottery, and a Plea for the Publication of Contextual Material – Patricia Kögler ;

BOOK REVIEWS ;
Sarah James, Hellenistic Pottery. The Fine Wares, Corinth 7, 7 – Brice Erickson ;
Gabriel Mazor, Walid Atrash & Gerald Finkielsztejn, Bet She’an IV. Hellenistic Nisa-Scythopolis. The Amphora Stamps and Sealings from Tel Iztabba – Marek Palaczyk ;
Henrieta Todorova (ed.), Durankulak 3. Die hellenistischen Befunde – Reyhan Şahin ;
Idit Sagiv, Representations of Animals on Greek and Roman Engraved Gems. Meaning and Interpretations – Shua Amorai-Stark & Malka Hershkovitz ;
Kalliope Bairami, Large Scale Rhodian Sculpture of Hellenistic and Roman Times – Natalia Kazakidi ;
Qumran, Unchecked Parallelomina, and Pseudonymity in Academic Publication, review article of Kenneth Silver, Alexandria and Qumran: Back to the Beginning – Dennis Mizzi
Mapping the Past: From Sampling Sites and Landscapes to Exploring the ‘Archaeological Continuum’Proceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 8 Session VIII-1 edited by Michel Dabas, Stefano Campana and Apostolos Sarris. Paperback; 205x290mm; 94 pages; 35 figures, 1 table (colour throughout). 676 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697131. £24.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697148. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Session VIII-1 of UISPP 2018 in Paris ‘Mapping the Past’ brought together several contributions reflecting on the need to develop sustainable and reliable approaches to mapping our landscape heritage. The session was guided by the crucial concept termed the ‘archaeological continuum’. This concept can be defined as a proactive approach to landscape survey based on the summative evidence detected (or detectable) within the area under examination, reducing spatial and chronological gaps as far as possible through the intensive and extensive application of a wide variety of exploratory methods and analytical techniques. Research work across Europe as well as contributions presented in this session have demonstrated that it is now possible to explore the whole landscape of carefully chosen areas and study them as an archaeological continuum. Archaeological interpretations derived from this kind of approach can be expected to reveal different layers of information belonging to a variety of chronological horizons, each displaying mutual physical (stratigraphic) and conceptual relationships within that horizon. The raising of new archaeological questions and also the development of alternative conservation strategies directly stimulated by the radical ideas inherent in the concept of the ‘archaeological continuum’ are among the major outcomes of the session.

About the Editors
Michel Dabas is Senior Researcher and Co-Director of the Laboratory of Archaeology at Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris (AOROC) where he develops approaches for the provision of interactive maps on the web (chronocarto.eu portal) and focuses on the application of geophysical methods for archaeological sites. ;

Stefano R.L. Campana is Professor of Landscape Archaeology at the University of Siena. His research is focused on the understanding of past Mediterranean landscapes from late prehistory to contemporary times. ;

Apostolos Sarris is ‘Sylvia Ioannou’ Professor of Digital Humanities at the Archaeological Research Unit, University of Cyprus and Research Director at F.O.R.T.H.: Head of the GeoSat ReSeArch Lab. He is an Adjunct/Affiliate Professor at Cyprus University of Technology and a Research Associate of the Department of Anthropology, the Field Museum of Natural History of Chicago, Illinois, USA. His research focuses on geophysical prospection, GIS spatial modelling and satellite remote sensing in archaeology.
IKUWA6. Shared Heritage: Proceedings of the Sixth International Congress for Underwater Archaeology28 November–2 December 2016, Western Australian Maritime Museum Fremantle, Western Australia edited by Jennifer A. Rodrigues and Arianna Traviglia. Paperback; 205x290mm; 698 pages; illustrated throughout in colour. 666 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781784916428. £95.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784916435. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Celebrating the theme ‘Shared heritage’, IKUWA6 (the 6th International Congress for Underwater Archaeology), was the first such major conference to be held in the Asia-Pacific region, and the first IKUWA meeting hosted outside Europe since the organisation’s inception in Germany in the 1990s. A primary objective of holding IKUWA6 in Australia was to give greater voice to practitioners and emerging researchers across the Asia and Pacific regions who are often not well represented in northern hemisphere scientific gatherings of this scale; and, to focus on the areas of overlap in our mutual heritage, techniques and technology. Drawing together peer-reviewed presentations by delegates from across the world who converged in Fremantle in 2016 to participate, this volume covers a stimulating diversity of themes and niche topics of value to maritime archaeology practitioners, researchers, students, historians and museum professionals across the world.

About the Editors
Jennifer Rodrigues graduated as an archaeologist in Australia before specialising her training at the University of Southampton’s Centre for Maritime Archaeology, England, in 2000, after which she joined the Mary Rose Trust. Upon returning to Australia, she worked as a heritage consultant in Victoria and New South Wales, investigating Indigenous heritage sites, before joining the Western Australian Museum as Curator, Collections Manager then Exhibitions Project Manager over 16 years. She completed her doctorate at the University of Western Australia in 2011, and was Editor of the Australasian Journal for Maritime Archaeology from 2012 to 2015. In 2019 she joined the National Museum of Australia in Canberra as Senior Curator of the Centre for Indigenous Knowledges.

Arianna Traviglia is the Coordinator of the IIT Centre for Cultural Heritage Technology (Italy). Trained as an archaeologist, her work primarily focuses on mediating the inclusion of digital technology within the study of archaeological landscapes, especially waterscapes and lagoon environments. From 2006 to 2015 she held positions as Postdoctoral Fellow in Australia at Sydney and Macquarie Universities, before re-entering European academia as recipient of a Marie Curie Fellowship in 2015. She is Co- Editor of the Journal of Computer Application in Archaeology (JCAA) and currently a member of the Management Committee of the EC COST Action Arkwork, and a PI on the H2020 NETCHER project focused on protection of endangered Cultural Heritage.
Studies in ArchaeometryProceedings of the Archaeometry Symposium at NORM 2019, June 16-19, Portland, Oregon, Portland State University. Dedicated to the Rev. H. Richard Rutherford, C.S.C., Ph.D edited by Mario Ramírez Galán and Ronda Sandifer Bard. Paperback; 203x276mm; 276 pages; illustrated throughout in colour. 120 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789697346. £46.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789697339. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

This volume is in honor of the American scholar Rev. H. Richard Rutherford, C.S.C, Ph.D (University of Portland). It contains the papers presented at the Archaeometry Symposium in the 74th Northwest Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society (NORM) which took place in Portland (Oregon), June 18th 2019, covering a wide range of topics. The volume includes papers about the application of different techniques in archaeology in order to comprehend some aspects during and after the excavation, for instance, physics, chemical analysis, remote sensing, LiDAR, etc. This work compiles papers about sites from different places around of the world, Spain, Canada, Thailand, Lithuania or Russia.

The aim of the symposium was to facilitate communication between scholars from different places, to present current work in the field, and to stimulate future research.

About the Editors
Mario Ramírez Galán, PhD., is Adjunct Professor in archaeology at the University of Portland (Portland, Oregon) and PhD. in archaeology from the UAH (Alcalá de Henares, Madrid). He has participated in international and Spanish congresses and roundtable sessions. He has participated in several archaeological excavations in the United States in collaboration with the city of Salem (Oregon) to study several aspects of its cultural heritage. Furthermore, he worked at different Spanish archaeological projects, for instance, the battle of Baecula or Complutum. Additionally, he has published papers in some of the most important journals (Archaeometry and Archaeological Prospection), and also books about battlefield archaeology, landscape archaeology, new technologies applied to archaeology, and archaeometry. During the last years, his investigation has been focused on the application of different techniques to study the medieval siege of Alcalá la Vieja. Ronda Sandifer Bard, PhD., is Lecturer in Chemistry at the University of Portland (Portland, Oregon). Her research interests include carbanion chemistry, polymer-bound reactive intermediates, and archaeometry, particularly XRF analysis of metal and bone artifacts. Since 2014, she has helped lead the annual UP Pollentia Undergraduate Research Expedition at the ancient Roman city of Pollentia in Mallorca, Spain, where UP faculty-student teams work at the invitation of the Consortium of the Roman City of Pollentia and its Directors and in collaboration with the Pollentia Field School associated with the University of Barcelona.
The dawn of the Islamic era? The excavation of Yughbī in the Crowded Desert of Qatar by Jose C. Carvajal López, Kirk Roberts, Laura Morabito, Gareth Rees, Frank Stremke, Anke Marsh, David M. Freire-Lista, Robert Carter & Faiṣal ‘Abd Allāh al-Na‘īmī. Pages 53-69 from Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies Volume 50 2020 edited by Daniel Eddisford. PSAS. Download Full PDF 

This paper introduces the main results of the excavation at the site of Yughbī during the last season of fieldwork of The Crowded Desert Project in the north-west of Qatar between March and April 2018. While the area of Yughbī was occupied for a long period of time, this paper focuses on a small number of stone buildings that dated mainly to the Umayyad period (AD 661–750), but also with reference to a more extended occupation that may be dated as early as the late Sasanian-Rāshidūn caliphate period (AD 498–661), and perhaps even earlier, to the early ‘Abbāsid period (c. AD 750–900). The Umayyad phase includes stone buildings that served as a permanent or semi-permanent base for a nomadic group in the process of sedentarization, or recently settled at the site. The finds of pottery, glass, metals, and other materials indicate that the community living at the site was well integrated within a wider landscape that included economic interests in the desert and the sea, and even long-distance connections.
The Maltese Archipelago at the Dawn of HistoryReassessment of the 1909 and 1959 Excavations at Qlejgħa tal-Baħrija and Other Essays edited by Davide Tanasi and David Cardona. Paperback; 205x290mm; 188 pages; 192 figures, 27 tables (77 pages of colour). 667 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694932. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694949. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

The Maltese Archipelago at the Dawn of History. Reassessment of the 1909 and 1959 excavations at Qlejgħa tal-Baħrija and other essays is a collection of essays focusing on the reassessment of the multifaceted evidence which emerged by excavations carried out in 1909 and 1959 in the settlement of Bahrija, a key site for the understanding of the later stages of Maltese prehistory before the beginning of the Phoenician colonial period. The two excavations, largely unpublished, produced a large quantity of ceramic, stone and metal artefacts together with skeletal remains. The reappraisal of the material will shed light on critical moments of central Mediterranean prehistory. Main topics such as the Aegean-Sicily-Malta trade network, mass migration movements from the Balkans towards the Central Mediterranean and the colonial dynamics of the Phoenicians operating in the West are addressed in the light of new data and with the support of an array of archaeometric analyses.

About the Editors
Davide Tanasi is an expert of Mediterranean prehistory and archaeology of ancient Sicily and Malta, in which fields is has published several papers and monographic volumes such as: D. Tanasi, N. Vella (eds), Site, artefacts, landscape: prehistoric Borġ in-Nadur, Malta, Monza: Polimetrica 2011; D. Tanasi, N. Vella (eds) The late prehistory of Malta: essays on Borġ in-Nadur and other sites, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2015. ;

David Cardona is Senior Curator of Phoenician, Roman and Medieval sites with the governmental agency Heritage Malta. He is a specialist of Roman and Late Roman archaeology and in this field he is about to publish a comprehensive work on Malta entitled Roman buildings and their architecture in Malta. His research interests include landscape archaeology, archaeology of technology and architecture.

Reviews
'Like every good piece of research, this volume answers questions and raises new ones. It also offers a space to revisit conclusions and voice dissent where needed. The collaborative nature of the work is particularly welcome and it is hoped that this standard will be adopted across all archaeological research on the islands. This is the beginning of a new era for Bronze Age studies on the Maltese Islands.'—Isabelle Vella Gregory, Malta Archaeological Review, 2021, Issue 12
New Agendas in Remote Sensing and Landscape Archaeology in the Near EastStudies in Honour of Tony J. Wilkinson edited by Dan Lawrence, Mark Altaweel and Graham Philip. Paperback; 205x290mm; 346 pages; 181 figures, 22 tables, 10 plates (46 pages of colour). 662 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695731. £50.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695748. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

New Agendas in Remote Sensing and Landscape Archaeology in the Near East is a collection of papers produced in honour of Tony James Wilkinson, who was Professor of Archaeology at Durham University from 2006 until his death in 2014. Though commemorative in concept, the volume is an assemblage of new research representing emerging agendas and innovative methods in remote sensing. The intention is to explore the opportunities and challenges faced by researchers in the field today, and the tools, techniques, and theoretical approaches available to resolve them within the framework of landscape archaeology. The papers build on the traditional strengths of landscape archaeology, such as geoarchaeology and settlement pattern analysis, as well as integrating data sources to address major research questions, such as the ancient economy, urbanism, water management and the treatment of the dead. The authors demonstrate the importance of an interdisciplinary approach for understanding the impact of human activity on shaping the landscape and the effect that landscape has on sociocultural development.

About the Editors
Dr Dan Lawrence is an Associate Professor in the department of Archaeology at Durham University and director of the Archaeology Informatics Laboratory, a specialist hub for remote sensing and computational approaches to the archaeological record. He has directed landscape survey projects across the Middle East and Central Asia, and is currently working on the publication of survey work in Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan. ;

Mark Altaweel
is Reader in Near East Archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. He has taught courses and conducted research on Near Eastern history and archaeology, using GIS, computational modelling, big data analytics, remote sensing methods, and socialecological theory. He has led many projects in the Near East while being also involved in various research projects on complex systems in other disciplines. ;

Graham Philip is Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology in the Department of Archaeology, Durham University. He has served as Editor of the journal Levant since 2008. He excavated the Chalcolithic / Early Bronze Age site of Tell esh-Shuna North in Jordan (1991-94) and currently directs a collaborative project with the American University of Beirut at the Neolithic and EBA site of Tell Koubba in North Lebanon.
Stone in Metal AgesProceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 6, Session XXXIV-6 edited by Francesca Manclossi, Florine Marchand, Linda Boutoille and Sylvie Cousseran-Néré. Paperback; 205x290mm; 134 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (24 pages in colour). Papers in English and French. 659 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696677. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696684. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

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Session XXXIV-6 of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4–9 June 2018, Paris, France): ‘Stone in Metal Ages’ was divided in two parts. The first, ‘Late stone talks: Lithic industries in Metal Ages’, was concerned with knapping. The papers dealt with lithic technology, use-wear analyses and the relation between the decline of stone and the development of metallurgy. The second, ‘Let there be rock and metal: l’outillage en pierre des métallurgistes préhistoriques de la mine à l’atelier’, was designed for papers focussing on stone tools used for metallurgy. This publication combines these two parts. Despite the fact that metal took the place of stone in many spheres, the analysis of lithic products created during the Metal Ages has seen progressive development. Objects and tools made of flint, chert and other stone materials remain important components of the archaeological record, and their study has offered new perspectives on ancient societies. Not only have many aspects of the everyday life of ancient people been better understood, but the socioeconomic and cultural systems associated with the production, circulation and use of stone tools have offered new information not available from other realms of material culture.

About the Editors
Francesca Manclossi is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and she is affiliated at the Centre de Recherche Français de Jérusalem. ;

Florine Marchand is part of an experimental archaeology team investigating the pressure techniques with the collaboration of Archéorient of Jalès (Casteljau-et-Berrias, France). ;

Linda Boutoille held a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellowship and subsequently a Royal Irish Academy Research Grant, based at Queen’s University Belfast. ;

Sylvie Cousseran-Néré is an archaeologist of the French National Archaeological Research Institute (Inrap).
Demography and Migration Population trajectories from the Neolithic to the Iron AgeProceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 5: Sessions XXXII-2 and XXXIV-8 edited by Thibault Lachenal, Réjane Roure and Olivier Lemercier. Paperback; 205x290mm; 180 pages; 89 figures, 2 tables. Papers in English and French. Print RRP: £35.00. 653 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696653. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696660. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

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This volume presents the combined proceedings of two complementary sessions of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4–9 June 2018, Paris, France): Sessions XXXII-2 and XXXIV-8. These sessions aimed to identify demographic variations during the Neolithic and Bronze Age and to question their causes while avoiding the potential taphonomic and chronological biases affecting the documentation. It appears that certain periods feature a large number of domestic and/or funeral sites in a given region and much fewer in the following periods. These phenomena have most often been interpreted in terms of demographics, habitat organization or land use. They are sometimes linked to climatic and environmental crises or historical events, such as population displacements. In the past few years, the increase in large-scale palaeogenetic analyses concerning late prehistory and protohistory has led to the interpretation of genomic modifications as the result of population movements leading to demographic transformations. Nevertheless, historiography demonstrates how ideas come and go and come again. Migration is one of these ideas: developed in the first part of the XX century, then abandoned for more social and economic analysis, it recently again assumed importance for the field of ancient people with the increase of isotopic and ancient DNA analysis. But these new analyses have to be discussed, as the old theories have been; their results offer new data, but not definitive answers. During the sessions, the full range of archaeological data and isotopic and genetic analysis were covered, however for this publication, mainly archaeological perspectives are presented.

About the Editors
Réjane Roure is Senior Lecturer in Protohistoric Archaeology at Paul Valéry Montpellier 3 University; she works in the Joint Research Unit ‘Archaeology of Mediterranean Societies’ (JRU5140-ASM). Specialist in Iron Age societies in Mediterranean Celtic, she works on relations between the Mediterranean and continental Europe, on contacts between Greeks and Gauls and on the ritual practices of ancient societies. Since 2002, she has directed excavations at the archaeological site of Cailar (South of France), where had been found human remains linked to the Gallic practice of severed heads.

Thibault Lachenal is a CNRS Research Fellow and manager of the ‘Society of Prehistory and Protohistory’ team of the ‘Archaeology of Mediterranean Societies’ laboratory (UMR5140-ASM) in Montpellier. Specialist in the Bronze Age in the North-Western Mediterranean, his work focuses on the study of material culture, settlement and selective deposition of metalwork. He has supervised and collaborated in several archaeological excavations in southern France, Corsica and northern Italy and is currently in charge of underwater research at the La Motte site in Agde, a submerged Late Bronze Age settlement.

Olivier Lemercier is Professor of Prehistory at the University Paul Valéry - Montpellier 3 (France), and director of studies for the Master of Archaeology and Doctor of Archaeology degrees sp. Prehistory, Protohistory, Paleoenvironments, Mediterranean and African. Specialist in Bell Beakers and more generally the Neolithic and the transition to the Bronze Age in Europe and the Mediterranean, he is member of the editorial board of the Bulletin de la Société Préhistorique Française, member appointed to the CNRA and the Scientific Council of the Inrap. Author or coordinator of five books and a hundred scientific articles. He is currently President of
A Biography of Power: Research and Excavations at the Iron Age 'oppidum' of Bagendon, Gloucestershire (1979-2017) by Tom Moore. Paperback; 205x290mm; 626 pages, illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 621 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695342. £85.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695359. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

This volume explores the changing nature of power and identity from the Iron Age to Roman period in Britain. Presenting detailed excavation results and integrating a range of comprehensive specialist studies, A Biography of Power provides fresh insights into the origins and nature of one of the lesser-known, but perhaps most significant, Late Iron Age oppida in Britain: Bagendon in Gloucestershire.

Combining the results of a large-scale geophysical survey, with analysis of both historic and new excavations, this volume reassesses Iron Age occupation at Bagendon, revealing evidence for diverse artisanal activities and complex regional exchange networks that saw livestock, and people, travelling to Bagendon from west of the Severn. The results of excavation of two morphologically unusual, banjo-like enclosures, and of one of the previously unexamined dykes, has revealed that the Bagendon oppidum had earlier origins and more complex roles than previously envisaged. The volume also provides new insights into the nature of the Iron Age and Roman landscape in which Bagendon was situated. Detailing the discovery of two, previously unknown, Roman villas at Bagendon, this research also demonstrates the continued significance of this landscape in the early Roman province.

This volume redefines Bagendon as a landscape of power, which offers important insights into the changing nature of societies from the Middle Iron Age to Roman period. It calls for a radical reassessment of how we define oppida complexes and their socio-political importance at the turn of the 1st millennium BC.

Contains contributions from Sophia Adams, Michael J. Allen, Sam Bithell, Loïc Boscher, Cameron Clegg, G.B. Dannell, Lorne Elliott, Elizabeth Foulds, Freddie Foulds, Christopher Green, Derek Hamilton, Colin Haselgrove, Yvonne Inall, Tina Jakob, Mandy Jay, Sally Kellett, Robert Kenyon, Mark Landon, Marcos Martinón-Torres, Edward McSloy, Janet Montgomery, J.A. Morley-Stone, Geoff Nowell, Charlotte O’Brien, Chris Ottley, Cynthia Poole, Richard Reece, Harry Robson, Ruth Shaffrey, John Shepherd, Jane Timby, Dirk Visser, D.F. Williams, Steven Willis.

About the Editor
Tom Moore is an Associate Professor of Archaeology at Durham University. His research focuses on the western European Iron Age and approaches to cultural landscape management. He has published widely on Iron Age social organisation and conducted major field projects at Late Iron Age oppida in Britain and France, including at Bibracte, Burgundy. He is co-author of the textbook: Archaeology: an introduction.

Reviews
'...the excavation results and then the wider discussions are synergetic and demonstrate that the Bagendon project's methodology of a landscape approach is a powerful tool in developing an understanding of the change and continuity that underlies the mechanisms of power and place in the dynamic socio-political landscape of the Late Iron Age and Early Roman interlude. This is a major personal and academic achievement for Tom Moore and for the many organisations who enabled the individual stages of the work through the 'mosaic' funding.'—Tim Copeland, Bristol & Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, March 2021
The Archaeological Survey of Sudanese Nubia, 1963-69: The Pharaonic Sites edited by David N. Edwards. Hardback; 205x290mm; 468 pages; 812 figures, 2 tables (16 plates in colour). 652 2020 Sudan Archaeological Research Society Publication 23. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696493. £75.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696509. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Of the Nubian Archaeological Campaigns responding to the construction of the Aswan High Dam, the survey and excavations carried out within Sudanese Nubia represent the most substantial achievement of the larger enterprise. Many components of the larger project of the UNESCO – Sudan Antiquities Service Survey have been published, in addition to the reports of a number of other major projects assigned separate concessions within the region. However, the results of one major element, the Archaeological Survey of Sudanese Nubia (ASSN) between the Second Cataract and the Dal Cataract remain largely unpublished. This volume, focusing on the pharaonic sites, is the first of a series which aims to bring to publication the records of the ASSN. These records represent a major body of data relating to a region largely now lost to flooding. This is also a region of very considerable importance for understanding the archaeology and history of Nubia more generally, not least in relation to the still often poorly understood relationships between Lower Nubia to the north and the surviving areas of Middle and Upper Nubia, to the south.

The ASSN project fieldwork was undertaken over six years between 1963 and 1969, investigating c.130km of the river valley between Gemai, at the south end of the Second Cataract, and Dal.
Le verre de Sabra al-Mansuriya - Kairouan, Tunisie - milieu Xe-milieu XIe siècle : Production et consommation: vaisselle - contenants - vitrages by Danièle Foy with a contribution by Ian Freestone; preface by Faouzi Mahfoudh. Paperback; 300 pages; 111 figures; French text with abstract in English and Arabic. 650 2020 Archaeology of the Maghreb 1. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696615. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696622. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Islamic glass and its craftsmanship in the Medieval period are known almost exclusively from Middle Eastern literature. The study of the structures of the workshop and the very rich glass assemblage from Sabra al-Mansuriya (Kairouan), the Fatimid capital founded in 947/948 and destroyed in 1057, proves that Ifriqiya followed the technological evolutions of glass craftsmanship.

An examination of the furnaces and the various artefacts discovered highlights the double vocation of a palatial factory: to produce glass and glazed ceramics. From this particular workshop, installed in the wing of a palace, we found everyday glassware as well as more luxurious types, some with very specific forms, others reproducing models known throughout the Islamic world. These productions are local and imported – distinguished through morphological and chemical analyzes – and form the basis of a first typology of glass used in Ifriqiya from the 10th to 11th century.

Architectural glass, partly made on site, is also abundant. The crown-glass of different colours, used whole or in small fragments, adorned the openwork panel walls with various carvings. The windows and their glass offered a rich polychrome and a complex decorative syntax, reflecting significant technical mastery and the desire to display economic and political power.

About the Author
Danièle Foy is Emeritus Research Director at CNRS, Centre Camille Jullian (Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, CCJ, Aix-en-Provence, France). Her work concerns crafts, trade and consumption of glass in Antiquity, the Middle Ages and the pre-industrial period in the Mediterranean area.

Le verre islamique et son artisanat à l’époque médiévale sont presque exclusivement connus par la documentation du Proche-Orient. L’étude des structures de l’atelier et du très riche mobilier en verre de Sabra al-Mansuriya (Kairouan), capitale fatimide fondée en 947/948 et détruite en 1057, prouve que l’Ifriqiya n’est pas resté en retrait de l’essor de l’artisanat verrier. L’examen des fours et des différents artefacts mis au jour met en évidence la double vocation d’une fabrique palatiale : produire du verre et de la céramique glaçurée. De cet atelier particulier, installé dans l’aile d’un palais, sortaient des verres communs et d’autres plus luxueux, certains de formes spécifiques, d’autres reproduisant des modèles connus dans l’ensemble du monde islamique. Ces productions locales et les importations, distinguées par l’étude morphologique et les analyses chimiques, forment la base d’une première typologie des verres utilisés dans l’Ifriqiya des Xe-XIe siècle.

Le verre architectural, en partie fabriqué sur place, est également abondant. Les cives de différentes couleurs, utilisées entières ou en menus fragments, garnissaient des claustras de plâtre très ajourés et aux découpes variées. Les fenêtres et leurs vitraux offraient une riche polychromie et une syntaxe décorative complexe, traduisant une grande maîtrise technique et la volonté d’exprimer un pouvoir économique et politique.

Danièle Foy est directrice de recherches émérite au CNRS, Centre Camille Jullian (Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, CCJ, Aix-en- Provence, France). Ses travaux concernent l’artisanat, le commerce et la consommation du verre dans l’Antiquité, le Moyen Age et la période pré-industrielle dans l’espace méditerranéen. Ses publications sur le verre islamique portent sur le mobilier de Fustat-Le Caire, Hadir et Damas en Syrie et Sharma au Yémen. En Tunisie, elle a principalement étudié le verre d’époque romaine provenant de Carthage, Pupput, Sidi Jdidi et Nabeul.
Glazed Brick Decoration in the Ancient Near East edited by Anja Fügert and Helen Gries. Paperback; 205x290mm; 130 pages; 97 figures, 5 tables (61 colour pages). 645 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696059. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696066. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Glazed bricks applied as a new form of colourful and glossy architectural decor first started to appear in the early Iron Age on monumental buildings of the Ancient Near East. It surely impressed the spectators then as it does the museum visitors today. Glazed Brick Decoration in the Ancient Near East comprises the proceedings of a workshop held at the 11th International Congress of the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East (ICAANE) at Munich in April 2018, organised by the editors. Over the last decade excavations have supplied new evidence from glazed bricks that once decorated the facades of the Ancient Near East’s public buildings during the Iron Age (1000–539 BC) and especially significant progress has been achieved from revived work on glazed bricks excavated more than a century ago which today are kept in various museum collections worldwide. Since the latest summarising works on Ancient Near Eastern glazed architectural décors have been published several decades ago and in the meantime considerable insight into the subject has been gained, this volume aims to provide an updated overview of the development of glazed bricks and of the scientific research on the Iron Age glazes. Furthermore, it presents the on-going research on this topic and new insights into glazed bricks from Ashur, Nimrud, Khorsabad, and Babylon.

About the Editors
Anja Fügert received her master’s degree in Near Eastern Archaeology at the Freie Universität Berlin in 2005 with a dissertation on the Old Babylonian palace at Uruk. From 2005 to 2014 she was a staff member of the research project Tell Sheikh Hamad / Syria and in 2013 she defended her PhD on the Neo-Assyrian glyptics from this site. After working as a freelance illustrator in the Egyptian National Museum in Cairo she did a 2-year traineeship at the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin. She also taught courses of Near Eastern Archaeology at the Freie Universität Berlin and at the Georg-August-Universität Göttingen. Since December 2017 she is the head of the editorial office of the Orient-Department of the German Archaeological Institute. Together with Helen Gries, she initiated and directs the project The Reconstruction of the Glazed Brick Facades from Ashur in the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin (GlAssur).

Helen Gries obtained MA in Near Eastern Archaeology at Johannes Gutenberg-Universität of Mainz in 2010. In 2011 she started her PhD as a member of the Graduate School ‘Formen von Prestige in Kulturen des Altertums’ at Ludwig-Maximilians- Universität of Munich. In 2014 she completed her PhD at Munich with a dissertation on the Ashur temple at Ashur. She has undertaken fieldwork in Syria, Iran, Lebanon, and Jordan. In 2014 and 2015 she was postdoc researcher and lecturer at Institute of Near Eastern Archaeology at the University of Munich. Since 2015 she is researcher and curator for Mesopotamia at the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin. Together with Anja Fügert, she directs the project The Reconstruction of the Glazed Brick Facades from Ashur in the Vorderasiatisches Museum Berlin (GlAssur), which is funded by the German Research Foundation since 2018.
Different Times? Archaeological and Environmental Data from Intra-Site and Off-Site SequencesProceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 4, Session II-8 edited by Zoï Tsirtsoni, Catherine Kuzucuoğlu, Philippe Nondédéo, Olivier Weller. Paperback; 205x290mm; 136 pages; 39 figures, 10 tables (colour throughout). Papers in English and French. Print RRP: £32.00. 642 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696516. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696523. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

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Different Times? Archaeological and environmental data from intra-site and off-site sequences brings together seven papers from Session II-8 of the XVIII UISPP Congress (Paris, 4-9 June 2018). The session questioned temporal correlations between intra-site and off-site data in archaeology-related contexts. The word ‘site’ describes here archaeological sites or groups of sites – usually settlements – that have undergone research in recent years and produced information on the duration and timing of human presence. Comparison with evidence from geomorphological and paleoenvironmental research conducted at various distances from settlements gives some interesting results, such as ‘missing’ occupation periods, distortions in human presence intensity through space as well as time, variability in explanations concerning the abandonment of settlements, etc. Examples presented here highlight: first, discrepancies between time records within built areas used for living and the surrounding lands used for other activities (cultivation, herding, travelling, etc); second, discrepancies produced by the use of different ‘time markers’ (ie. chronostratigraphy of archaeological layers or pottery evolution on the one hand, sedimentary or pollen sequences on the other hand). Although improving the resolution of individual data is essential, the authors argue that the joint and detailed examination of evidence produced together by human and natural scientists is more important for reaching a reliable reconstruction of past people’s activities. Both the session and the volume stem from the Working Group ‘Environmental and Social Changes in the Past’ (Changements environnementaux et sociétés dans le passé) in the research framework of the Cluster of Excellence ‘Dynamite’ (Territorial and Spatial Dynamics) of the University Paris 1-Panthéon-Sorbonne (ANR-11-LABX-0046, Investissements d’Avenir).

About the Editors
Zoï Tsirtsoni is an archaeologist and researcher at CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique), currently in position at the laboratory Archéologies et Sciences de l’Antiquité at Nanterre. She is a specialist in Aegean and Balkan prehistory and co-director, since 2008, of the Greek-French research project at the tell settlement of Dikili Tash in Greek Eastern Macedonia. Concerned with relative and absolute chronology, crafts (especially pottery), settlement, and problems of archaeological visibility, she has coordinated or participated in several collaborative interdisciplinary research projects (e.g. ANR ‘Balkans 4000’, ERC ‘PlantCult’), already published or in progress.

Catherine Kuzucuoğlu is a geomorphologist at CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique). Working in the fields of physical geography, geoarchaeology, volcanism and reconstruction of past climates and environments, she develops collaboration research programs with Turkish and international teams in Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Anatolia, investigating (1) Pleistocene and Holocene evolution of valleys and lakes, (2) geomorphological records of recent volcanic activity and landscape evolution, (3) reconstructions of climate and environment from lake and marsh records, and their impacts on past civilizations. She has been Deputy Director in charge of Archaeology at French Institute for Anatolian Studies in Istanbul (2000- 2003), and Director of Laboratory of Physical Geography (2009-2013).

Philippe Nondédéo is currently an investigator at the CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Sc
Barbaric Splendour: The Use of Image Before and After Rome edited by Toby F. Martin with Wendy Morrison. Paperback; 203x276mm; 152 pages; 38 figures (30 colour pages). 119 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696592. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696608. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Barbaric Splendour: the use of image before and after Rome comprises a collection of essays comparing late Iron Age and Early Medieval art. Though this is an unconventional approach, there are obvious grounds for comparison. Images from both periods revel in complex compositions in which it is hard to distinguish figural elements from geometric patterns. Moreover, in both periods, images rarely stood alone and for their own sake. Instead, they decorated other forms of material culture, particularly items of personal adornment and weaponry. The key comparison, however, is the relationship of these images to those of Rome. Fundamentally, the book asks what making images meant on the fringe of an expanding or contracting empire, particularly as the art from both periods drew heavily from – but radically transformed – imperial imagery.

About the Editors
Toby Martin currently works as a lecturer at Oxford University’s Department for Continuing Education, where he specialises in adult and online education. His research concentrates on theoretical and interpretative aspects of material culture in Early Medieval Europe. Toby has also worked as a field archaeologist and project officer in the commercial archaeological sector and continues to work as a small finds specialist.

Wendy Morrison currently works for the Chilterns Conservation Board managing the NLHF funded Beacons of the Past Hillforts project, the UK’s largest high-res archaeological LiDAR survey. She also is Senior Associate Tutor for Archaeology at the Oxford University Department for Continuing Education. Wendy’s research areas are Prehistoric European Archaeology and Landscape Archaeology. She has over a decade’s excavation experience in Southern Britain, the Channel Islands, and India.
On the Origins of the Cartouche and Encircling Symbolism in Old Kingdom Pyramids by David Ian Lightbody. DOI: 10.32028/9781789696578; Paperback; 203x276mm; 100 pages; 47 figures. 118 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696578. £25.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696585. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

On the Origins of the Cartouche and Encircling Symbolism in Old Kingdom Pyramids is a treatise on the subject of encircling symbolism in pharaonic monumental tomb architecture. The study focuses on the Early Dynastic Period and the Old Kingdom of ancient Egypt; from the first dynasty through the sixth. During that time, encircling symbolism was developed most significantly and became most influential. The cartouche also became the principal symbol of the pharaoh for the first time. This work demonstrates how the development of the cartouche was closely related to the monumental encircling symbolism incorporated into the architectural designs of the Old Kingdom pyramids. By employing a new architectural style, the pyramid, and a new iconographic symbol, the cartouche, the pharaoh sought to elevate his status above that of the members of his powerful court. These iconic new emblems emphasized and protected the pharaoh in life, and were retained in the afterlife. By studying the available evidence, the new and meaningful link between the two artistic media; iconographic and architectural, is catalogued, understood, and traced out through time.

Table of Contents
David Ian Lightbody, PhD., BEng (Hons), is an archaeologist with a special interest in the origins of architectural and scientific principles, most notably in the ancient Egyptian and Greek cultures. In 2016 he founded the Journal of Ancient Egyptian Architecture (JAEA) with co-editor Franck Monnier. He has published several journal articles, a monograph, and most recently, the Great Pyramid Haynes Operations Manual (2,590 B.C. onwards).
Megaliths and Geology: Megálitos e GeologiaMEGA-TALKS 2: 19-20 November 2015 (Redondo, Portugal) edited by Rui Boaventura†, Rui Mataloto and André Pereira. Paperback; 203x276mm; 196pp; 114 figures, 10 tables. 117 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696417. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696424. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

The MegaGeo project, under the direction of the late Rui Boaventura, aimed to analyse the raw material economy in the construction of megalithic tombs in multiple territories, showing the representation of several prehistoric communities that raised them and their relationship with the surrounding areas.

Following the meeting of the previous year, it was decided to hold Mega-Talks 2, which brought together national and international experts who have developed work related to Megalithism and Geology, in its various perspectives, from the funerary depositions to the raw material construction of the tombs, as indicators of mobility and interaction with the surrounding physical environment.

Megaliths and Geology: Megálitos e Geologia presents contributions from Mega-Talks 2, held in Redondo, Portugal, on 19-20 November 2015.

About the Editors
Rui Boaventura† (1971-2016) obtained a PhD in Prehistory from the School of Arts and Humanities (University of Lisbon) in 2010. As a Post-Doc researcher at UNIARQ (Center for Archaeology, University of Lisbon), in 2013 he headed the MEGAGEO Project: Moving megaliths in the Neolithic. He passed away in 2016, victim of a prolonged illness.

Rui Mataloto Pereira graduated from the School of Arts and Humanities (University of Lisbon) in 1997, before completing his Master’s degree at the same school in 2004. Over the past 15 years, he has directed studies on the Megalithism of the South slope of Serra d’Ossa.

André Pereira Pereira graduated in History, Archaeological Variant, from the School of Arts and Humanities (University of Lisbon) in 2003, and post-graduated in Science and Technology Management and Policies at Nova University (FCSH) in 2020. He currently works for UNIARQ (Centre for Archaeology, University of Lisbon), in Science Management in relation to archaeology.
EurASEAA14 Volume II: Material Culture and HeritagePapers from the Fourteenth International Conference of the European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists edited by Helen Lewis. Paperback; 203x276mm; 238 pages; 164 figures, 27 tables. 115 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695939. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695946. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

EurASEAA14: Material Culture and Heritage is the second of two volumes comprising papers originally presented at the EurASEAA14 (European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists) conference in 2012, updated for publication. The aim of the EurASEAA is to facilitate communication between different disciplines, to present current work in the field, and to stimulate future research. This international initiative aims to foster international scholarly cooperation in the field of Southeast Asian archaeology, art history and philology.

This volume focuses substantially on topics under the broad themes of archaeology and heritage, material culture, environmental archaeology, osteoarchaeology, historic and prehistoric archaeology, ethnoarchaeology, and long-distance contact, trade and exchange.

About the Editor
Helen Lewis is an associate professor at University College Dublin School of Archaeology. Her research in Southeast Asia has mostly focused on cave sites in Laos, Malaysian Borneo, and the Philippine island of Palawan, where she co-directs the Palawan Island Palaeohistory Research Project. She chaired the EurASEAA14 Conference in Dublin in 2012.

Table of Contents (provisional)
Editorial introduction to EurASEAA14 Volumes 1 and 2 – Helen Lewis ;
Ceramics from the Musi riverbed – John N. Miksic ;
The social dynamics of porcelain trade in the eleventh to sixteenth centuries CE Philippines: a chemical composition study – Rory Dennison and Laura Junker ;
The kilns of Myinkaba – for pottery or glass? – Don Hein and W. Ross H. Ramsay ;
The iron smelting technology of the Bujang Valley, Malaysia – Naizatul Akma Mokhtar and Mokhtar Saidin ;
Guide to understanding Khmer stoneware characteristics, Angkor, Cambodia – Chhay Rachna, Tho Thon and Em Socheata ;
New data on the chronology of Khmer stonewares – Armand Desbat ;
The conical rollers of Ban Non Wat, northeastern Thailand – Christina Sewall ;
Late Pleistocene/Holocene ecological and cultural transition in the Philippines – Jonathan H. Kress ;
Middle Pleistocene sites in Bukit Bunuh, Lenggong, Perak, Malaysia – Nor Khairunnisa Talib, Mokhtar Saidin and Jeffrey Abdullah ;
Metabolism, mythology, magic or metaphor? Animals in the rock art of Thailand – Lauren Winch ;
Tooth blackening and betel nut chewing at the Early Iron Age sites of Gò Ô Chùa (Vietnam) and Prohear (Cambodia) – Simone Krais, Michael Francken and Andreas Reinecke ;
The cultural and biological context of the Song Keplek 5 specimen, East Java: implications for living conditions and human-environment interactions during the later Holocene – Sofwan Noerwidi, Harry Widianto and Truman Simanjuntak ;
Probable prehistoric Southeast Asian influences in New Guinea? New archaeological and anthropological approaches to former axioms – Henry Dosedla ;
Ancient settlement in the lakes area of East Java Province, Indonesia: the potential for archaeological research with public benefits – Gunadi Kasnowihardjo ;
The relevance of archaeology to contemporary concerns: the Department of Agriculture of the Philippines and ancient foodways – Michelle S. Eusebio ;
Toward an understanding of cultural heritage and sustainable management: a case study from Phrae Province, Thailand – Mizuho Ikeda ;
Bibliography
EurASEAA14 Volume I: Ancient and Living TraditionsPapers from the Fourteenth International Conference of the European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists: Volume I edited by Helen Lewis. Paperback; 203x276mm; 244 pages; 170 figures, 13 tables. (Print RRP: £45.00). 114 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695052. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695069. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

EurASEAA14: Ancient and Living Traditions is the first of two volumes comprising papers originally presented at the EurASEAA14 (European Association of Southeast Asian Archaeologists) conference in 2012, updated for publication. The aim of the EurASEAA is to facilitate communication between different disciplines, to present current work in the field, and to stimulate future research. This international initiative aims to foster international scholarly cooperation in the field of Southeast Asian archaeology, art history and philology.

This volume focuses substantially on topics under the broad themes of archaeology and art history, epigraphy, philology, historic archaeology, ethnography, ethnoarchaeology, ethnomusicology, materials studies, and long-distance trade and exchange.

About the Editor
Helen Lewis is an associate professor at University College Dublin School of Archaeology. Her research in Southeast Asia has mostly focused on cave sites in Laos, Malaysian Borneo, and the Philippine island of Palawan, where she co-directs the Palawan Island Palaeohistory Research Project. She chaired the EurASEAA14 Conference in Dublin in 2012.

Table of Contents (provisional)
Editorial introduction to EurASEAA14 Volumes 1 and 2 – Helen Lewis ;
Events in the Life of the Buddha: Pagan sculptures in the Hermitage collection and their context in the art of mainland Southeast Asia – Olga Deshpande and Pamela Gutman† ;
A note on two peculiar stone pedestals in the form of atlas dwarfish figures (yakṣas) – Valérie Zaleski ;
Representations of the female in Thai Buddhist manuscript paintings – Jana Igunma ;
Prajñāpāramitā in thirteenth century Java and Sumatra: two sculptures disconnected by textile designs – Lesley S Pullen ;
Islamic calligraphy, re-interpreted by local genius in Javanese mosque ornamentation, Indonesia (fifteenth century CE to present) – Hee Sook Lee-Niinioja ;
Understanding the Champa polity from archaeological and epigraphic evidence – a critical stocktaking – Bishnupriya Basak ;
A tale of two Khmer bronzecasting families, the Chhem and the Khat: how traditional bronzecasting revived in the area around Phnom Penh after the Khmer Rouge (1975-1979), and the expansion and modernization of that tradition in the 1990s: a preliminary report – Jane P. Allison ;
The history and distribution of the free-reed mouth-organ in SE Asia – Roger Blench ;
The ethnoarchaeology of Southeast Asian foragers: resiliency in Ata indigenous knowledge and cultural expression in the pre-Hispanic and Hispanic Philippines – Larissa Smith ;
Megalithic rituals of the Maram tribe of Manipur – Binodini Devi Potshangbam ;
The hidden, unique, bronze battleship from Mt. Dobo, East Flores, Indonesia, assumed to date to the Dong-So’n period – Herwig Zahorka† ;
Kattigara of Claudius Ptolemy and Óc Eo: the issue of trade between the Roman Empire and Funan in the Graeco-Roman written sources – Kasper Hanus and Emilia Smagur ;
Cowries in southwestern China, and trade with India and Myanmar in ancient and modern times – Xiao Minghua ;
The source of the seashells and ivories found in southwest China in the pre-Qin Period – Duan Yu ;
Southeast Asia and the development of advanced sail types across the Indian Ocean – Tom Hoogervorst ;
Mediaeval Fansur: a long-lost harbor in Aceh – Edmund Edwards McKinnon and Nurdin A.R. ;
‘The world turned upside down’: sago-palm processors in northeast India and the origins of Chinese civilization – Roger Blench ;
Bibliography
Caractérisation, continuités et discontinuités des manifestations graphiques des sociétés préhistoriquesProceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 3, Session XXVIII-4 edited by Elena Paillet, Marcela Sepulveda, Eric Robert, Patrick Paillet and Nicolas Mélard. Paperback; 205x290mm; 118 pages; 108 figures, 7 tables, 1 plate. French text. Print RRP: £32.00. 640 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696356. £32.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696363. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

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This volume presents the proceedings of Session XXVIII-4 of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France), Caractérisation, continuités et discontinuités des manifestations graphiques des sociétés préhistoriques. Papers address the question of exchange and mobility in prehistoric societies in relation to the evolution of their environments through the prism of their graphic productions, on objects or on walls. This volume offers the opportunity to question their symbolic behaviours within very diverse temporal, chrono-cultural or geographic contexts. It also provides the framework for a discussion on cultural identity and how this was asserted in the face of environmental or social changes or constraints.

French Description
La session du XVIIIème congrès de l’UIPP intitulée « caractérisation, continuités et discontinuités des manifestations graphiques des sociétés préhistoriques» aborde la question des échanges et de la mobilité des sociétés préhistoriques, en prise avec l’évolution de leurs milieux, à travers le prisme de leurs productions graphiques, sur objets ou sur parois. Ce volume offre l’occasion de questionner leurs comportements symboliques, au sein de contextes temporels, chrono-culturels ou géographiques très divers. Il offre aussi le cadre d’une discussion sur l’identité culturelle et de la façon dont ils l’ont affirmée, face aux changements ou aux contraintes environnementales ou sociales. Propulseurs décorés au Magdalénien, ou objets en ivoire du Gravettien, témoignent tour à tour de permanences techniques ou symboliques, et en même temps de singularités locales à l’échelle de l’Europe. La notion d’identité culturelle est abordée à travers la production singulière de l’art mobilier du Taillis des Côteaux, ou de la thématique, rare mais pas secondaire, du félin dans l’art pariétal et mobilier, illustrant des frontières souvent ténues entre sphères fonctionnelle et symbolique. Enfin, la relation entre l’art et son environnement se décline sur des territoires rupestres plus récents mais tout aussi remarquables, le Bassin parisien au Mésolithique, et l’Egypte prédynastique. Les articles de cette session montrent ainsi comment les systèmes de pensées exprimés par des images peuvent ainsi perdurer sur le temps long, et témoigner de pratiques sociales élaborées, dont les rythmes ne sont pas toujours en adéquation avec les productions matérielles du quotidien.

Elena Paillet est conservatrice du Patrimoine au Service régional de l’Archéologie, DRAC Bretagne et UMR 6566 CReAAH Université de Rennes 1.

Marcela Sepulveda est Professeur Associée Escuela de Antropología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Chercheur associée UMR 8096 ArchAm (CNRS-Paris 1) & UMR8220 LAMS (CNRS- Sorbonne Université).

Eric Robert est préhistorien, Maitre de conférences au Museum national d’Histoire naturelle, UMR Hitoire naturelle de l’Homme Préhistorique 7194 (CNRS, MNHN, UPVD).

Patrick Paillet est préhistorien, Maître de conférences HDR (habilité à diriger des recherches) du Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle (Département Homme et Environnement, UMR 7194 « Histoire naturelle de l’Homme préhistorique »).

Nicolas Mélard est conservateur du patrimoine, archéologue, Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des musées de France, UMR 7055 Préhistoire et Technologie (CNRS / Université Paris Nanterre).
Peintures et gravures rupestres des Amériques: Empreintes culturelles et territorialesProceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 2, Session XXV-3 edited by Brigitte Faugère and Philippe Costa. Paperback; 205x290mm; 108 pages; 66 figures, 2 tables (colour throughout). French text. Print RRP: £28.00.. 639 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696332. £28.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696349. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

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The rock art of the Americas was produced at very different times and by different cultures, both by hunter-gatherers, fishermen and by farmers from village or state societies. Each group can be characterised by diverse styles and techniques. The function of rock art depended on religious, political or social concerns that referred to a particular context and time. Peintures et gravures rupestres des Amériques: Empreintes culturelles et territoriales presents the proceedings from Session XXV-3 of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France). Papers address the following questions: How does the study of rock art make it possible to culturally characterize its authors? What does it tell us about the function of sites? How and under what circumstances does it make it possible to delimit a cultural territory? The six articles in this volume provide case studies from Mexico, El Salvador, Costa Rica, French Guiana and Chile.

Brigitte Faugère is a professor of archaeology at the University of Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. Since the 1990s, she has led research projects on the cultures of north-central and western Mexico, in particular in the field of rock art.

Philippe Costa is an archaeologist specializing in Central America and an associate researcher at the Center for Mexican and Central American Studies. Since 2018, he has directed a Franco-German-Costa Rican archaeological project in the Guanacaste mountain range of Costa Rica.

French Description:
L’art rupestre des Amériques a été produit à des époques et par des cultures très différentes, tant par les chasseurs cueilleurs pêcheurs que par les agriculteurs inscrits dans des sociétés villageoises ou étatiques. Chaque groupe ou société a développé des styles d’une grande diversité et utilisé des techniques différentes, qui les caractérisent. La fonction de l’art rupestre dépendait de préoccupations religieuses, politiques ou sociales qui se réfèrent à un contexte et à une époque particulière. Les questions qu’abordent ce symposium organisé lors du XVIIIe colloque annuel de l’IUSPP sont ainsi : En quoi l’étude de l’art rupestre permet-il de caractériser culturellement ses auteurs ? Que nous apprend-il sur la fonction des sites ? En quoi et dans quelles circonstances permet-il de délimiter un territoire culturel ? Les six articles que comptent ce volume permettent d’aborder des études de cas portant sur le Mexique, le Salvador, le Costa Rica, la Guyane française et le Chili. Même si des peintures rupestres sont connues dans tous ces pays, les études proposées dans ce volume concernent en majorité des gravures. Deux grandes options ont été choisies par les auteurs : s’intéresser à une tradition particulière et à sa fonction dans une région donnée (Philippe Costa pour le Salvador, Joseph Mountjoy pour l’Occident du Mexique, Felipe Sol pour le Costa Rica, Françoise Fauconnier pour le Chili) ou bien recenser les différentes traditions présentes sur un territoire et essayer d’interpréter leur diversité (B. Faugère pour le centre-nord du Mexique, Gérald Migeon pour la Guyane française).

Brigitte Faugère est archéologue spécialiste du Mexique et Professeur à l’Université Paris 1 Panthéon- Sorbonne. Elle dirige depuis les années 1990 des projets de recherche sur les cultures du centre-nord et de l’Occident du Mexique, en particulier dans le domaine de l’Art rupestre. Elle est membre sénior de l’Institut Universitaire de France.

Philippe Costa est archéologue spécialiste de l’Amérique Centrale et chercheur as
Pre and Protohistoric Stone Architectures: Comparisons of the Social and Technical Contexts Associated to Their BuildingProceedings of the XVIII UISPP World Congress (4-9 June 2018, Paris, France) Volume 1, Session XXXII-3 edited by Florian Cousseau and Luc Laporte. Paperback; 205x290mm; 206 pages; 98 figures, 2 tables (colour throughout). Full parallel text in English and French. Print RRP: £38.00. 638 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695458. £38.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695465. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

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Pre and Protohistoric Stone Architectures: Comparisons of the Social and Technical Contexts Associated to Their Building presents the papers from Session XXXII-3 of the XVIII UISPP Congress (Paris, 4-9 June 2018). This session took place within the commission concerned with the European Neolithic. While most of the presentations fell within that chronological period and were concerned with the Atlantic coast and the Mediterranean basin, wider geographical and chronological comparisons were also included. This volume aims to break the usual limits on the fields of study and to deconstruct some preconceived ideas. New methods developed over the past ten years bring out new possibilities regarding the study of such monuments, and the conference proceedings open up unexpected and promising perspectives. This volume is a parallel text edition in English and French.

About the Editors
Florian Cousseau is a Post-Doctoral Research Associate at the University of Geneva (Switzerland). His work focuses on megalithic architecture in Western Europe for which he has developed a new methodology. He has adapted building archaeology methodology to study pre-protohistoric elevations. As a result he has updated the data of famous sites in northwestern France such as Barnenez, Guennoc and Carn.

Luc Laporte is Research Director at CNRS (France). He is a specialist in the Neolithic period in Europe, and on the subject of megaliths in general. He has published widely on the megaliths of western France, Western Europe, and Africa, for the Neolithic and Protohistoric periods.
Aristotle’s Μετεωρολογικά: Meteorology Then and Now by Anastasios A. Tsonis and Christos Zerefos. Hardback; 175x245mm; 126pp; 34 figures (17 in colour). 631 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696370. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696387. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Aristotle’s Μετεωρολογικά concentrates on the meteorological aspects of Aristotle’s work published as Meteorologica (Μετεωρολογικά or Meteorology) books A-D, and on how they compare now with our understanding of meteorology and climate change. In other words, how well did Aristotle fair when he tried to explain weather 2,300 years ago when there was only logic, eye observation, and past experience, with only primitive instrumentation and a few personalized measurements? While there are scientific issues behind Aristotle’s writings, this book is written for the non-specialist. The book uses simple examples to present its case, which will be easily followed by general readers.

About the Author
Anastasios Tsonis is an Emeritus Distinguished Professor in the Department of Mathematical Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) and an Adjunct Research Scientist at the Hydrologic Research Center in San Diego, CA. His research interests include Chaos theory, Climate dynamics, and Networks. He is the author of more than 135 peer reviewed scientific publications and he has been invited speaker in numerous conferences. He is also the author of nine books.

Christos Zerefos is Head of the Research Centre for Atmospheric Physics and Climatology, Academy of Athens, Professor of Atmospheric Physics at the Universities of Athens and Thessaloniki, and Visiting Professor at the Universities of Boston, Minnesota and Oslo. He is State Representative for Climate Change for Greece. He has published numerous scientific papers and books in the fields of atmospheric physics and climatology.
Engraved Gems and Propaganda in the Roman Republic and under Augustus by Paweł Gołyźniak. Hardback; 618 pages; fully illustrated catalogue containing 1,015 figures (in colour). 627 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 65. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695397. £90.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695403. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Engraved Gems and Propaganda in the Roman Republic and under Augustus deals with small, but highly captivating and stimulating artwork – engraved gemstones. Although in antiquity intaglios and cameos had multiple applications (seals, jewellery or amulets), the images engraved upon them are snapshots of people's beliefs, ideologies, and everyday occupations. They cast light on the self-advertising and propaganda actions performed by Roman political leaders, especially Octavian/Augustus, their factions and other people engaged in the politics and social life of the past.

Gems can show both general trends (the specific showpieces like State Cameos) as well as the individual and private acts of being involved in politics and social affairs, mainly through a subtle display of political allegiances, since they were objects of strictly personal use. They enable us to analyse and learn about Roman propaganda and various social behaviours from a completely different angle than coins, sculpture or literature.

The miniaturism of ancient gems is in inverse proportion to their cultural significance. This book presents an evolutionary model of the use of engraved gems from self-presentation (3rd-2nd century BC) to personal branding and propaganda purposes in the Roman Republic and under Augustus (until 14 AD). The specific characteristics of engraved gems, their strictly private character and the whole array of devices appearing on them are examined in respect to their potential propagandistic value and usefulness in social life.

The wide scope of this analysis provides a comprehensive picture covering many aspects of Roman propaganda and a critical survey of the overinterpretations of this term in regard to the glyptic art. The aim is the incorporation of this class of archaeological artefacts into the well-established studies of Roman propaganda, as well as the Roman society in general, brought about by discussion of the interconnections with ancient literary sources as well as other categories of Roman art and craftsmanship, notably coins but also sculpture and relief.

About the Author
Paweł Gołyźniak works as a Research Fellow in the Institute of Archaeology, Jagiellonian University in Krakow. His research interests include engraved gems (ancient and neo-classical), Roman Republican and Augustan numismatics, history of antiquarianism, collecting and scholarship as well as 18th century drawings of intaglios and cameos and the legacy of antiquary and connoisseur Philipp von Stosch (1691-1757).

Reviews
'... this volume—splendidly produced at an extraordinarily low price for what it contains (and actually free to download in PDF format)—is a book of enduring worth. Gołyźniak deserves our gratitude for writing one of the best books on Roman gems to have been published for a very long time.'—Dr Martin Henig, The Journal of Gemmology, Volume 37, No. 3, 2020
Paisajes en un sector de la Quebrada de Humahuaca durante la Etapa AgroalfareraArqueología de Tumbaya (Jujuy, Argentina) by Agustina Scaro. Paperback; 203x276mm; 304pp; 216 figures, 58 plates. Spanish text. Print RRP £52.00.. 116 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694895. £52.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694901. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Quebrada de Humahuaca is the center of important and diverse continuous cultural developments and presents places that are key references in the archaeology of Argentina. However, numerous spaces, such as Tumbaya, have not yet been the subject of systematic and intensive research. There, the study began as a response to the interest of the local aboriginal community to know the pre-Hispanic past of the area. Tumbaya, in the central-south sector of Quebrada de Humahuaca, is a particular space since its environmental and geomorphological characteristics have allowed important interactions between the groups that inhabited the area and those of other regions, added to a social dynamic that gives a distinctive character to the sector. Within this framework, the landscapes that were configured in the central-south sector of Quebrada during the agricultural-ceramist period were studied, concerning its social identity and the links it may have had with other sectors of the circumpuneña area. The landscape approach, understood from a comprehensive perspective, allowed consideration of the natural, social and symbolic environment of the inhabitants of the area throughout its occupational history, including the materiality generated and manipulated to configure the landscape and define a particular identity. Thus, the landscape was conceived as a dynamic space, socially built by the daily activities, beliefs and value system of the social actors who carry out an act of memory that is constitutive of both their identity, their conception and legitimation of the territory.

About the Author
Agustina Scaro, Assistant Researcher of the National Council of Scientific and Technological Research of Argentina, studies Landscape and Materiality issues in the Central-South Andes. She has worked in Quebrada de Humahuaca (northern Argentina) for more than a decade, with the aim of understanding local pre-Inca societies and the impact of Inca domination on them from different lines of evidence.

Spanish description: La Quebrada de Humahuaca ha sido espacio de importantes y diversos desarrollos culturales continuados y presenta lugares que son referencias claves en la arqueología de Argentina. Sin embargo, numerosos espacios, como Tumbaya, aún no han sido objeto de una investigación sistemática e intensiva. Allí, el estudio se inició frente al interés de la comunidad aborigen local de conocer el pasado prehispánico de la zona. Tumbaya, en el sector centro-sur de la Quebrada de Humahuaca, es un espacio particular ya que sus características ambientales y geomorfológicas han permitido importantes interacciones entre los grupos que habitaron la zona y los de otras regiones, sumada a una dinámica social que dan un carácter diferenciador al sector. En este marco, se ha buscado comprender los paisajes que se configuraron en el sector centro-sur de la Quebrada durante la etapa agroalfarera, en relación con su identidad social y las vinculaciones que pudo tener con otros sectores del área circumpuneña. El enfoque del paisaje, entendido desde una perspectiva abarcadora, permitió considerar el entorno natural, social y simbólico de los habitantes de la zona a lo largo de su historia ocupacional, incluyendo la materialidad generada y manipulada para configurar el paisaje y definir una identidad particular. Así, se concibió al paisaje como un espacio dinámico, socialmente construido por las actividades diarias, creencias y sistema de valores de los actores sociales quienes al habitar el paisaje, llevan a cabo un acto de memoria que es constitutivo tanto de su identidad como de su concepción y legitimación del territorio.

Agustina Scaro: Actual Investigadora Asistente del Concejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Tecnológicas de Argentina, Agustina Scaro estudia temas de Paisaje y Materialidad en los Andes Centro-Sur. La autora ha trabajado en la Quebrada de Humahuaca (norte de Argentina) por más de una déc
Before/After: Transformation, Change, and Abandonment in the Roman and Late Antique Mediterranean edited by Paolo Cimadomo, Rocco Palermo, Raffaella Pappalardo and Raffaella Pierobon Benoit. Paperback; 203x276mm; 126 pages; 39 figures (8 plates in colour). Print RRP: £30.00. 112 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695991. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696004. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Before/After explores various aspects related to transformation and change in the Roman and Late Antique world through the archaeological and historical evidence. The seven chapters of the volume range from the evolution of settlement patterns to spatial re-configuration after abandonment processes. Geographically the volume aims to cover – through case studies – the enlarged Roman world from Spain, to Cyprus, from the Rhine area borderland to the Red Sea. The book is the result of a workshop organized as part of the Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference, held in Rome during March 2016.

About the Editors
Paolo Cimadomo is a Post-Doc Research Fellow at the University of Naples ‘Federico II’ (Italy). His main research interests are the Hellenistic and Roman Near East. He has worked in different areas of the Eastern Mediterranean (Israel, Jordan, Syria, Turkey) and is the author of The Southern Levant during the first centuries of the Roman rule (64 BCE-135 CE) (Oxbow Books, 2019) ;

Rocco Palermo is a Researcher and Lecturer at the University of Groningen (Netherlands), and Associate Director of the Erbil Plain Archaeological Survey (Iraqi Kurdistan, Harvard University). He has carried out extensive fieldwork in the Middle East (Syria, Jordan, Iraq), where he explores the formation and development of imperial landscapes through the archaeological record. He is the author of On the Edge of Empires. North Mesopotamia during the Roman Period (Routledge, 2019). ;

Raffaella Pappalardo obtained her PhD in Ancient History from University of Naples ‘Federico II’ (Italy). As a pottery specialist she has taken part in many archaeological projects in Syria, Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon, where she was in charge of the ceramic assemblages. Her publication record reflects her interest in the socio-cultural role of pottery in the ancient world, and specifically in the period between the Late Antique and the Islamic world. ;

Raffaella Pierobon Benoit is associate member of Arts and Sciences Academy of Naples (Italy), and was Professor of Archaeology of the Roman Provinces at the University of Naples ‘Federico II’ until 2015. She has carried out extensive fieldwork in Italy and directed archaeological projects in France (Anderitum/Javols) and Turkey (Mandalya Gulf Survey). She was Associate Director of the Italian Archaeological Expedition at Tell Barry (Syria) from 1989 to 2004, and Project Director since 2005.

Reviews
'The volume succeeds in its stated aim of collecting ‘precise analysis of specific case studies’ (p. vi) and is an important reminder that close study of the available data is key to understanding the causes of change, both on local and on regional scales.'—Hallvard R Indgjerd, The Classical Review, April 2021
The Antonine Wall: Papers in Honour of Professor Lawrence Keppie edited by David J. Breeze and William S. Hanson. Paperback; 206x255mm; 494 pages; 166 figures; 15 tables (exp. RRP £30.00). 613 2020 Archaeopress Roman Archaeology 64. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694505. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694512. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

The Antonine Wall, the Roman frontier in Scotland, was the most northerly frontier of the Roman Empire for a generation from AD 142. It is a World Heritage Site and Scotland’s largest ancient monument. Today, it cuts across the densely populated central belt between Forth and Clyde.

In this volume, nearly 40 archaeologists, historians and heritage managers present their researches on the Antonine Wall in recognition of the work of Lawrence Keppie, formerly Professor of Roman History and Archaeology at the Hunterian Museum, Glasgow University, who spent much of his academic career recording and studying the Wall. The 32 papers cover a wide variety of aspects, embracing the environmental and prehistoric background to the Wall, its structure, planning and construction, military deployment on its line, associated artefacts and inscriptions, the logistics of its supply, as well as new insights into the study of its history. Due attention is paid to the people of the Wall, not just the officers and soldiers, but their womenfolk and children.

Important aspects of the book are new developments in the recording, interpretation and presentation of the Antonine Wall to today's visitors. Considerable use is also made of modern scientific techniques, from pollen, soil and spectrographic analysis to geophysical survey and airborne laser scanning. In short, the papers embody present-day cutting edge research on, and summarise the most up-to-date understanding of, Rome's shortest-lived frontier.

The editors, Professors Bill Hanson and David Breeze, who themselves contribute several papers to the volume, have both excavated sites on, and written books about, the Antonine Wall.

Table of Contents
List of Figures ;
List of Tables ;
List of Contributors ;
Abbreviations ;
1. Lawrence Keppie: an appreciation – David J. Breeze and William S. Hanson ;
2. The Antonine Wall: the current state of knowledge – William S. Hanson and David J. Breeze ;
3. The Landscape at the time of construction of the Antonine Wall – Mairi H. Davies ;
4. The Impact of the Antonine Wall on Iron Age Society – Lesley Macinnes ;
5. Pre-Antonine coins from the Antonine Wall – Richard J Brickstock ;
6. Planning the Antonine wall: an archaeometric reassesment of installation spacing – Nick Hannon, Lyn Wilson, Darrell J Rohl ;
7. The curious incident of the structure at Bar Hill and its implications – Rebecca H Jones ;
8. Monuments on the margins of Empire: the Antonine Wall sculptures – Louisa Campbell ;
9. Building an image: soldiers’ labour and the Antonine Wall Distance Slabs – Iain M. Ferris ;
10. New perspectives on the structure of the Antonine Wall – Tanja Romankiewicz, Karen Milek, Chris Beckett, Ben Russell and J. Riley Snyder ;
11. Wing-walls and waterworks. On the planning and purpose of the Antonine Wall – Erik Graafstal ;
12. The importance of fieldwalking: the discovery of three fortlets on the Antonine Wall – James J. Walker ;
13. The Roman temporary camp and fortlet at Summerston, Strathclyde – Gordon S. Maxwell and William S. Hanson ;
14. Thinking small: fortlet evolution on the Upper German Limes, Hadrian’s Wall, the Antonine Wall and Raetian Limes – Matthew Symonds ;
15. The Roman fort and fortlet at Castlehill on the Antonine Wall: the geophysical, LiDAR and early map evidence – William S. Hanson and Richard E. Jones ;
16. ‘... one of the most remarkable traces of Roman art ... in the vicinity of the Antonine Wall.’ A forgotten funerary urn of Egyptian travertine from Camelon, and related stone vessels from Castlecary – Fraser Hunter ;
17. The Kirkintilloch hoard revisited – J.D. Bateson ;
18. The external supply of pottery and cereals to Antoni
London’s Waterfront 1100–1666: excavations in Thames Street, London, 1974–84 by John Schofield, Lyn Blackmore and Jacqui Pearce, with Tony Dyson. Paperback; 210x297mm; xxiv+514 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (132 colour plates). English text with summaries in French and German.. 422 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695595. £65.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781784918385. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Please note: 2018 hardback edition is now out of print. New paperback edition published in March 2020.

London’s Waterfront 1100–1666: excavations in Thames Street, London, 1974–84 presents and celebrates the mile-long Thames Street in the City of London and the land south of it to the River Thames as an archaeological asset. The argument is based on the reporting of four excavations of 1974–84 by the Museum of London near the north end of London Bridge: Swan Lane, Seal House, New Fresh Wharf and Billingsgate Lorry Park. Here the findings of the period 1100–1666 are presented.

Buildings and property development on sixteen properties south of Thames Street, on land reclaimed in many stages since the opening of the 12th century, include part of the parish church of St Botolph Billingsgate. The many units of land reclamation are dated by dendrochronology, coins and documents. They have produced thousands of artefacts and several hundred kilos of native and foreign pottery. Much of this artefactual material has been published, but in catalogue form (shoes, knives, horse fittings, dress accessories, textiles, household equipment). Now the context of these finds, their deposition in groups, is laid out for the first time. Highlights of the publication include the first academic analysis and assessment of a 13th- or 14th-century trumpet from Billingsgate, the earliest surviving straight trumpet in Europe; many pilgrim souvenirs; analysis of two drains of the 17th century from which suggestions can be made about use of rooms and spaces within documented buildings; and the proposal that one of the skeletons excavated from St Botolph’s church is John Reynewell, mayor of London in 1426–7 and a notable figure in London’s medieval history.

The whole publication encourages students and other researchers of all kinds to conduct further research on any aspect of the sites and their very rich artefactual material, which is held at the Museum of London’s Archaeological Archive. This is a significantly large and varied dataset for the archaeology and history of London in the period 1100 to 1666 which can be continuously interrogated for generations to come.

About the Authors
John Schofield was an archaeologist at the Museum of London from 1974 to 2008. He has written several well-received books on the archaeology of London and of British medieval towns; and as Cathedral Archaeologist for St Paul’s Cathedral, archaeological accounts of the medieval and Wren buildings. ;
Lyn Blackmore is a Senior Ceramics and Finds Specialist who has worked for MOLA and its predecessors since 1986. In 2009–14 she was Assistant Treasurer of the Medieval Pottery Research Group and in 2017 was elected co-editor of its journal Medieval Ceramics, a role she first held in 1989–94. ;
Jacqui Pearce is a Senior Ceramics Specialist with MOLA, focusing especially on medieval and later pottery, on which she has published widely. In 2017 she was elected President of the Society for Post-Medieval Archaeology. ;
Tony Dyson was the principal documentary historian and general editor at the Department of Urban Archaeology of the Museum of London from 1974 to 1998.

The Neglected Goat: A New Method to Assess the Role of the Goat in the English Middle Ages by Lenny Salvagno. Paperback; 203x276mm; 888 pages; 744 figures, 351 tables (colour throughout). 113 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696295. £120.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696301. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Distinguishing between the bones of sheep and goats is a notorious challenge in zooarchaeology. Several methods have been proposed to facilitate this task, largely based on macro-morphological traits.

This approach, which is routinely adopted by zooarchaeologists, although still valuable, has also been shown to have limitations: morphological discriminant traits can differ in different sheep/ goat populations and a correct identification is highly dependent upon experience, as well as the availability of appropriate reference collections and the degree to which a researcher is prepared to ‘risk’ an identification.

The Neglected Goat provides a new, more objective and transparent methodology, based on a combination of morphological and biometrical analyses, to distinguish between sheep and goat post cranial bones. Additionally, on the basis of the newly proposed approach, it reassesses the role of the goat in medieval England.

There are several historical and archaeological questions concerning the role of this animal that have so far remained unanswered: why is the goat commonly recorded in the Domesday Book, when it appears to be so scarce in the contemporary archaeological record? Is the goat under-represented in the archaeological record or over-represented in the Domesday Book? Why is this animal, when identified in English medieval animal bone assemblages, almost exclusively represented by horncores?

Through the investigation of a number of English sheep and goat medieval assemblages, this study sheds light on these questions, and suggests that the goat was indeed rarer than the Domesday Book suggests.

About the Author
Lenny Salvagno has an Honours Degree in Cultural Heritage with Archaeology from the University of Parma (Italy) and a PhD in zooarchaeology from the University of Sheffield (UK). At Sheffield, she also completed a two-year Post-Doc (funded by the Gerda Henkel Stiftung) focussing on changes in pig husbandry during the Late Medieval-Early Modern transition in England. She is now an Honorary Research Fellow at the Department of Archaeology in Sheffield and a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Post- Doctoral Fellow at the Institute of Palaeoanatomy, domestication research and veterinary history, at the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich (Germany). Lenny’s main interests are in animal domestication and husbandry intensification, the use of animals in medieval and post-medieval Britain, as well as Bronze and Iron Age Italy, ritual deposits, and the use of statistics and geometric morphometrics in zooarchaeology. She is also passiona oarchaeology and the presentation of this field of study to the general public.
Late Prehistoric Fortifications in Europe: Defensive, Symbolic and Territorial Aspects from the Chalcolithic to the Iron AgeProceedings of the International Colloquium ‘FortMetalAges’, Guimarães, Portugal edited by Davide Delfino, Fernando Coimbra, Gonçalo P. C. Cruz and Daniela Cardoso. Paperback; 205x290mm; 256 pages; 93 figures; 5 tables; 2 maps (colour throughout). 617 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692549. £45.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692556. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Late Prehistoric Fortifications in Europe: Defensive, Symbolic and Territorial Aspects from the Chalcolithic to the Iron Age presents the contributions to the International Colloquium ‘FortMetalAges’ (10th–12th November 2017, Guimarães, Portugal), The Colloquium was organised by the Scientific Commission ‘Metal Ages in Europe’ of the International Union of Prehistoric and Protohistoric Sciences (UISPP/ IUSPP) and by the Martin Sarmento Society of Guimarães. Nineteen papers discuss different interpretive ideas for defensive structures whose construction had necessitated large investment, present new case studies, and conduct comparative analysis between different regions and chronological periods from the Chalcolithic to the Iron Age.

About the Editors
Davide Delfino obtained his PhD from the University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro. He is a Bronze Age specialist at the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities, Visiting Professor at the Polytechnic Institute of Tomar (UNESCO Chair in Humanity and Cultural Integrated Landscape Management), and an internal researcher of the Geosciences Centre (University of Coimbra). In 2015 Davide was appointed secretary of the UISPP/IUPPS Scientific Commission ‘Metal Ages in Europe’. ;

Fernando A. Coimbra holds a PhD in Prehistory and Archaeology (University of Salamanca ‘Extraordinary Prize’). Fernando is Visiting Professor at the Polytechnic Institute of Tomar, and internal researcher of the Geosciences Centre (University of Coimbra), Portugal, where he completed post-doctoral research on the Bronze and Iron Age rock art of the Tagus Valley. He is a member of several research projects in Portugal, Italy, Malta and Greece. ;

Gonçalo P. C. Cruz graduated in History and Archaeology at the University of Minho (Braga, Portugal) and is a staff archaeologist at the Martins Sarmento Society, Guimarães. His work involves the research and management of the archaeological sites under the administration of the Society, namely the Citânia de Briteiros and Castro de Sabroso, as well as the functioning and activity in different nuclei of the Martins Sarmento Museum. ;

Daniela Cardoso graduated in Landscape Archaeology at the Polytechnic Institute of Tomar, held an Erasmus award in Italy at the University of Ferrara in 2000, and completed in 2002 her Master of Advanced Studies degree at the Institute of Human Palaeontology, Paris. In 2015 she obtained her PhD in ‘Quaternário, Materiais e Culturas’ at the University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Portugal. She is currently Senior Museum Technician at the Martins Sarmento Society.
Approaches to the Analysis of Production Activity at Archaeological Sites edited by Anna K. Hodgkinson and Cecilie Lelek Tvetmarken. Paperback; 205x290mm; 206 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (58 pages in colour). 609 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695571. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695588. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Approaches to the Analysis of Production Activity at Archaeological Sites presents the proceedings of an international and interdisciplinary workshop held in Berlin in 2018, which brought together scholars whose work focusses on manufacturing activities identified at archaeological sites. The various approaches presented here include new excavation techniques, ethnographic research, archaeometric approaches, GIS and experimental archaeology as well as theoretical issues associated with how researchers understand production in the past. These approaches are applied to research questions related to various technological and socio-economic aspects of production, including the organisation and setting of manufacturing activities, the access to and use of raw materials, firing structures and other production-related installations. The chapters discuss production activities in various domestic and institutional contexts throughout the ancient world, together with the production and use of tools and other items made of stone, bone, ceramics, glass and faience. Since manufacturing activities are encountered at archaeological sites on a regular basis, the wide range of materials and approaches presented in this volume provides a useful reference for scholars and students studying technologies and production activities in the past.

About the Editors
Anna K. Hodgkinson (PhD Liverpool 2014) has recently completed a post-doctoral research fellowship at the Excellence Cluster Topoi. Her research focusses on Late Bronze Age (LBA) Egyptian settlement archaeology, LBA glass industries and chemical analysis of LBA glass objects. She has conducted archaeological fieldwork at the LBA Egyptian sites of Amarna, Gurob and Qantir.

Cecilie Lelek Tvetmarken (PhD Liverpool 2013) has worked as a post-doctoral researcher on several projects at the German Archaeological Institute (DAI), Berlin, and is currently involved in the joint Iranian-Danish research project ‘Tracking Cultural and Environmental Change’ (Razi University, Kermanshah, and the University of Copenhagen). Her research focusses on architecture and the use of space during the Neolithic in the Near East. She has conducted archaeological fieldwork at several Neolithic sites in Turkey, Jordan and Iran.
Eastern Roman Mounted Archers and Extraordinary Medico-Surgical Interventions at Paliokastro in Thasos Island during the ProtoByzantine PeriodThe Historical and Medical History Records and the Archaeo-Anthropological Evidence by Anagnostis P. Agelarakis. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+50 pages; 28 figures, 1 table (colour throughout). 111 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789696011. £20.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789696028. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Procopius’ History of the Wars, and the Strategikon offer important aspects of Eastern Roman military tactical changes adopted against their enemies that brought the mounted archer-lancer to domineer in the synthesis of the army, along with concise descriptions of their training, panoply, and effectiveness in the battlefield during the later ProtoByzantine period. Yet, evidence in the archaeo-anthropological records of these highly specialized military members has remained elusive.

A recent archaeological discovery at the strategically positioned, upland, site of Paliokastro in Thasos island, Greece, and the subsequent study of the human skeletal remains interred in four monumental funerary contexts, in a dedicated naiskos building, provide for the first time through the archaeological record of the region a unique insight of the mounted archers and their female kin during the turbulent ProtoByzantine period. The interdisciplinary study of the anthropological materials focusing on skeletal developmental, acquired skeleto-muscular manifestations and skeleto-anatomical changes recovered valuable evidentiary data on aspects of their in vivo long-term training and preparation, traumatisms and pathologies along with extraordinary traces of cranial and infra-cranial surgical interventions and medical regimens by the hands of a most experienced surgeon.

In conjunction with the archaeological and anthropological evidence, historical and medical history records are integrated aiming toward a nexus with the human dynamics that transpired at Paliokastro within the context of the catastrophic consequences of the ‘barbarian’ invasions in the Aegean Thraco-Macedonia, and the ravages afforded by the Justinian plague during the later component of the ProtoByzantine period.

About the Author
Anagnostis P. Agelarakis is Professor of Anthropology in the Department of History at Adelphi University in New York. He studied Classical Archaeology and European Ethnology as an undergraduate, and as graduate Environmental Studies at Lund University and Lund Polytechnic Institute in Sweden. He holds a M. Phil. and Ph.D. (1989) in Anthropology from Columbia University, New York.
Pottery of ManqabadA Selected Catalogue of the Ceramic Assemblage from the Monastery of ‘Abba Nefer’ at Asuyt (Egypt) by Ilaria Incordino. Paperback; 203x276mm; 128 pages; fully illustrated catalogue in colour. 110 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695137. £30.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695144. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Pottery of Manqabad presents a catalogue of selected pottery from the monastic site of Manqabad (Asyut, Egypt), which has, since 2011, been the object of an ongoing study and conservation project at the University of Naples ‘L’Orientale’ (UNIOR). The ceramic material, dated to the Late Antique Period, derives mostly from the SCA warehouse of el-Ashmunein, where it was kept soon after its accidental discovery in 1965. About 40 items derive from the surface collection and survey conducted on the site during the last fieldwork season (2018). The typologies identified include the most relevant Byzantine classes and a particular link with production from the Middle Egypt region. Part of the field survey was devoted to the analysis of the pottery material still in situ, found in the Northern Sector of the site where a 230m long row of monastic housing units is located. Further investigations will hopefully support the hypothesis of a local pottery production area, which could be identified in a large ‘dump’ at the southern end of the site. More generally, the analysis of the ceramics from Manqabad has underlined the undoubtedly high cultural level of the local monastic community, which can be deduced also from the textual, architectural and wall depiction evidence from the site. Manqabad was largely unknown to the scientific community, but since the first season of work by the Italian-Egyptian project, it has emerged as an important venue for the religious development of Coptic culture between the second half of the Vth to the end of the VIII- early IXth century AD.

About the author
Ilaria Incordino is Research Fellow and Adjunct Professor of Egyptology (BA) at the University of Naples ‘L’Orientale’ (UNIOR). Since 2011 she has been Deputy Director of the Italian-Egyptian Project of Study and Conservation of the Monastery of Manqabad, Asuyt, Egypt (UNIOR, Rome University, SCA), in charge of the study of the Late Antique pottery. She was promoter of several academic events at UNIOR: the Summer School ‘Pottery of the Nile Valley. Classification, documentation and new technology of analysis’ (2019), the ‘Current Research in Egyptology conference’ (2017), the MA in ‘Egyptology: Research Methods and Technology’ (2010) and the ‘First Neapolitan Congress of Egyptology’ (2008). In 2016 she was Curator of the new exposition of the Egyptian Collection of the National Archaeological Museum in Naples (MANN). She was member of the UNIOR excavations in the Eastern Central Desert (UNIOR, Helwan University, Cairo University) and at Mersa/Wadi Gawasis (UNIOR, Boston University).
Las relaciones comerciales marítimas entre Andalucía occidental y el Mediterráneo central en el II milenio a.C. by Mercedes de Caso Bernal. Paperback; 203x276mm; 140 pages; 30 figures (27 pages in colour). Spanish text. 109 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695113. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695120. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

This volume reflects on the unique status of the Western Mediterranean in the Bronze Age, considering the independence of its development and the existence of an indigenous maritime trade. It looks at ways to establish a chronology of the period that is not based solely on ceramic typologies, and aims to clarify the cultural exclusion to which the Lower Guadalquivir is subjected.

Tres son los principales problemas que se abordan para la Edad del Bronce en el Mediterráneo Occidental: La independencia en su desarrollo. La realidad de un comercio marítimo autóctono y la existencia de una cultura con tintes supraregionales. A los que se suman otros dos: Establecer una cronología del periodo que no se deba únicamente a las tipologías cerámicas, y esclarecer la exclusión cultural a la que es sometida el Bajo Guadalquivir, en la Península Ibérica.

La Geografía Física y la Humana son las bases en la que se apoya toda la investigación. En ellas se sumergen los análisis de las culturas en estudio y sus relaciones comerciales a través de la arqueología. La climatología dará explicación a la cronología y a los comportamientos socioeconómicos producidos, pudiéndose realizar un estudio sobre el tipo de sociedad existente o los motivos de las diferentes inauguraciones y clausuras de las poblaciones.

Mercedes de Caso Bernal, doctora internacional en Historia y Arqueología Marítima. Ha participado en varias investigaciones en Italia y proyectos nacionales e internacionales. La tesis doctoral ha abordado la Edad del Bronce en el Mediterráneo Occidental, siendo el caballo moderno autóctono el tema de su investigación posdoctoral en el que profundiza, al ser entendido como elemento de prestigio comercial para el mismo periodo cronológico.
Digging into the Dark AgesEarly Medieval Public Archaeologies edited by Howard Williams and Pauline Magdalene Clarke. Paperback; 203x276mm; 368 pages; 162 illustrations (138 pages in colour). 108 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789695274. £55.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789695281. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

What does the ‘Dark Ages’ mean in contemporary society? Tackling public engagements through archaeological fieldwork, heritage sites and museums, fictional portrayals and art, and increasingly via a broad range of digital media, this is the first-ever dedicated collection exploring the public archaeology of the Early Middle Ages (5th–11th centuries AD).

Digging into the Dark Ages builds on debates which took place at the 3rd University of Chester Archaeology Student Conference hosted by the Grosvenor Museum, Chester, 13 December 2017. It comprises original perspectives from students integrated with fresh research by heritage practitioners and academics. The book also includes four interviews offering perspectives on key dimensions of early medieval archaeology’s public intersections. By critically ‘digging into’ the ‘Dark Ages’, this book provides an introduction to key concepts and debates, a rich range of case studies, and a solid platform for future research.

About the Editors
Professor Howard Williams is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Chester and researches mortuary archaeology, archaeology and memory, the history of archaeology and public archaeology. He regularly writes an academic blog: Archaeodeath.

Pauline Magdalene Clarke graduated with a BA (Hons) degree in Archaeology with History in 2018, and an MA Past Landscapes and Environments in 2019, both from the University of Chester. Her MA dissertation focussed on the taphonomy of plant macrofossils.
Farmsteads and Funerary Sites: The M1 Junction 12 Improvements and the A5–M1 Link Road, Central BedfordshireArchaeological investigations prior to construction, 2011 & 2015–16 by Jim Brown. Hardback; 205x290mm; xxiv+596 pages; highly illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. (Print RRP £120.00). 556 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789692600. £120.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789692617. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

With major contributions by Paul Blinkhorn, Dana Challinor, Andy Chapman, Chris Chinnock, Joanne Clawley, Olly Dindol, Claire Finn, Val Fryer, Rebecca Gordon, Tora Hylton, Sarah Inskip, James Ladocha, Phil Mills, Stephen Morris and Jane Timby.

MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) undertook extensive excavations during the construction of two separate, but adjacent road schemes, some 4.5km apart near Houghton Regis and Toddington, in south Central Bedfordshire. Taken as a whole, the excavations provide a detailed multi-period dataset for regional and national comparison.

The first evidence for occupation occurred in the middle/late Bronze Age comprising pits and clusters of postholes, including four-post and six-post structures. Two pit alignments, more than 2km apart, also indicate that land divisions were being established, and in the late Bronze Age/early Iron Age a significant new settlement emerged in the valley bottom. Parts of a further contemporary earlier-middle Iron Age settlement lay at the top of the valley but neither settlement extended into the Roman period. In the late Iron Age or early Roman period three or four new settlements emerged with occupation continuing into the late Roman period in at least one of these. Of particular interest was the recovery of two significant Aylesford-Swarling type cemeteries as well as a third cemetery which largely comprised unurned burials, including some busta, but with few accompanying grave goods.

In the late 7th-century a small probable Christian conversion open-ground inhumation cemetery was established with burials accompanied by a range of objects, including a rare work box, knives, brooches, chatelaine keys and a spearhead. Parts of three medieval settlements were uncovered including one with a potters' working area.
Piazza ArmerinaL'area nord dell'insediamento medievale presso la Villa del Casale edited by Carmela Bonanno. Paperback; 203x276mm; 172 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white. 107 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694604. £35.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694611. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Archaeological explorations in the area north of the Roman Villa of Casale in Piazza Armerina (Sicily) were carried out in 2013-2014. Investigations on the slopes of Monte Mangone overlooking the villa, and a survey carried out in the immediate surroundings of the hill in the Colla district, provided valuable new evidence regarding the extension of the medieval town. This exansion also impacted the areas east of the villa, and on the still existing road network that connected it to the river Gela-Nociara, in whose immediate vicinity it is now supposed there was a craft district.

The exhaustive archaeological investigations in the area demonstrate that to the north there are no structures relevant to the late antique villa, dating instead to the mid-tenth century; it is therefore an inhabited area of ​​the late Islamic era which is then abandoned and leveled. After a phase of abandonment, during which the area is sporadically used as a burial place, a Norman settlement is built, datable to the mid 11th and mid 12th century.

Sui resti della Villa tardoantica del Casale di Piazza Armerina, tra il X secolo d.C. e gli inizi dell’XI si era impiantato un vasto insediamento islamico che occupava una vasta area anche a sud e a nord della Villa, di cui è stato esplorato un ampio settore con una strada glareata su cui si aprivano le unità residenziali, alcune delle quali presentavano un cortile interno basolato in cui si trovavano anche un focolare e un forno, intorno a cui si dislocavano i vari ambienti e spesso anche una scala per l’accesso al piano superiore o al tetto. Improvvisamente l’abitato venne abbandonato e i suoi resti furono livellati ; mentre a partire dalla metà dell’XI secolo viene costruito un nuovo abitato normanno, in cui si trova un ambiente rettangolare con portico laterale, una torre difensiva sul lato corto e un silos all’esterno per la conservazione delle derrate. Era un quartiere artigianale ceramico sorto sulla riva del vicino torrente Nocciara.

Nei primi decenni del XII secolo forse per un violento terremoto che colpì la Sicilia centro orientale o in seguito alla repressione della rivolta della popolazione islamica da parte di Guglielmo I, l’abitato venne abbandonato, ma la vita in esso continuò fino all’età federiciana.

L’abitato bizantino e medievale si estendeva anche alle colline retrostanti la Villa (Monte Mangone e Colla); in particolare sulla collina di C.da Colla, durante un survay effettuato su una vasta estensione di terreno, sono state raccolte terra sigillata africana e lastrine di rivestimento in marmo pregiato, che hanno fatto ipotizzare la presenza di un esteso insediamento tardo antico sulla collina retrostante a sud della Villa del Casale.
Arqueología de la Edad Moderna en el País Vasco y su entorno edited by Idoia Grau Sologestoa and Juan Antonio Quirós Castillo. Paperback; 203x276mm; iv+306 pages; illustrated throughout in colour and black & white (68 pages in colour). 106 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789694383. £48.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789694390. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Post-medieval archaeology is currently going through a critical phase of consolidation and disciplinary redefinition across Europe, where mere proposals or ambitions are becoming tangible scientific and disciplinary realities. This renovation is most evident in Southern Europe, where, until recently, these studies have been treated as somewhat marginal. The convergence of new actors and disciplines (historical archaeology, archaeology of the post-medieval centuries, professional archaeology, ethnoarchaeology or archaeological sciences), the promotion of new patrimonialization initiatives, and the creation of new action frameworks as a result of the deep economic crisis of the years 2007-2008 are some of the factors that have shaped current approaches to the archaeology of the Modern Age. Focussing on archaeological studies of the Modern Age located in the Basque Country, Arqueología de la Edad Moderna en el País Vasco y su entorno recognises the main themes investigated (cities, rural spaces, funeral spaces, consumption and production, communications systems, maritime archaeology), detects some of the strengths and weaknesses, and proposes new lines of action and disciplinary consolidation. In short, this volume aims to provide a summary of the current archaeological framework for investigations of the Modern Age in the Basque Country, and to make proposals for developing these practices in the future.

Las arqueologías postmedievales atraviesan en la actualidad una fase critica de consolidación y redefinición disciplinar en casi toda Europa, donde han pasado de ser meras propuestas o ambiciones para convertirse en realidades científicas y disciplinares tangibles. Esta renovación es más evidente en el sur de Europa, donde estos estudios han tenido hasta ahora un peso más bien marginal. La convergencia de nuevos actores y disciplinas (arqueología histórica, arqueología de los siglos postmedievales, arqueología profesional, etnoarqueología o las ciencias arqueológicas), el impulso de nuevas iniciativas de patrimonialización, y la creación de nuevos marcos de actuación como consecuencia de la profunda crisis económica de los años 2007-2008, son algunas de las causas que explican por qué se han ido definiendo con mayor claridad los contornos de la Arqueología de la Edad Moderna. A partir del ejemplo del País Vasco, este volumen realiza un diagnóstico sobre las principales temáticas indagadas (ciudades, espacios rurales, espacios funerarios, consumo y producción, sistemas de comunicaciones, arqueología marítima), detecta algunas de las fortalezas y debilidades de la arqueología de la Edad Moderna y propone nuevas líneas de actuación y de consolidación disciplinar. En definitiva, este libro pretende mostrar qué es la Arqueología de la Edad Moderna en el País Vasco en la actualidad y qué puede llegar a ser.

About the Editors
Idoia Grau Sologestoa is currently a post-doctoral researcher at the Integrative Prehistory and Archaeological Science (IPAS/IPNA) department, University of Basel. Previously, she worked at the universities of Sheffield, Nottingham and the Basque Country. Her main research interest is human and animal relationships in historical periods, from Roman to modern times. She is currently editing a book on innovations in the rural world during the Early Modern Era. ;

Juan Antonio Quirós Castillo is a Professor of Medieval Archaeology at the University of the Basque Country and Honorary Senior Research Associate at the Institute of Archaeology (University College London). He is the director of the Heritage and Cultural Landscapes Research Group of the University of the Basque Country and the Rural Medieval Research Group, CSIC-UPV/EHU. His principal interests lie in the study of the archaeology of landscapes, the archaeology of rural societies, Mediterranean archaeology, the archaeology of architecture, and the study of social c
Bar Locks and Early Church Security in the British Isles by John F. Potter. Paperback; 203x276mm; xviii+144 pages; 90 figures, 11 tables (includes 96 colour pages). 105 2020. Available both in print and Open Access. Printed ISBN 9781789693980. £40.00 (No VAT). Epublication ISBN 9781789693997. Book contents pageDownload Full PDF  Buy Now

Bar Locks and Early Church Security in the British Isles examines the evidence for the measures taken to make church buildings secure or defensible from their earliest times until the later medieval period. In particular it examines the phenomenon of ‘bar locks’ which the author identifies in many different contexts throughout England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland.

Bar locks take various forms and can be made of different materials, but they all provide a means of locking a door by placing a bar behind it from the inside which is then secured onto the door frame or housings on adjacent walls. The most dramatic examples are provided by thick wooden bars slotted into recesses incorporated in the adjacent door jambs. The volume describes and lists all the examples identified by the author and also publishes his photographs of the evidence for the first time.

The recognition of the role of bar locks in securing churches led the author to consider further measures which may have been introduced to enhance church security; these measures could Have had major implications for structural change and design in the buildings. These supplementary protective requirements and methods for achieving them are many and various and are also considered in the volume.

About the Author
John F. Potter trained as a geologist (BSc Manchester) specialising in lithostratigraphy (PhD London). He served as Principal of Farnborough College of Technology in Hampshire from 1975 to 1997, was Hon. Secretary of the Institution of Environmental Sciences, and Editor for many years of the international quarterly journal, The Environmentalist. On retirement he was appointed Emeritus Professor at the University of Surrey and joined the University of Reading in order to continue with the church building fabric studies which he started in 1975.

 


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