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Open Access Journal: Kernos - Revue internationale et pluridisciplinaire de religion grecque antique

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[First posted in AWOL 23 February 2011. Most recently updated 2 March 2020]

Kernos - Revue internationale et pluridisciplinaire de religion grecque antique
ISSN électronique 2034-7871

Kernos - Couverture du no 23 | 2010
Kernos est la seule revue scientifique internationale entièrement consacrée à l’étude des faits et phénomènes religieux de la Grèce antique. Elle a pour ambition de fournir aux chercheurs en ce domaine, mais aussi à toute personne intéressée par les questions religieuses, un instrument de réflexion et des outils de travail pour progresser dans la connaissance du système religieux des Grecs.
Actuellement, les textes des numéros 1 à 17 sont uniquement accessibles au format pdf [fac-similé], librement téléchargeables.

Derniers numéros

Numéros en texte intégral

Sketchfab Launches Public Domain Dedication for 3D Cultural Heritage

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Sketchfab Launches Public Domain Dedication for 3D Cultural Heritage
We are pleased to announce that cultural organisations using Sketchfab can now dedicate their 3D scans and models to the Public Domain using the Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication (CC0). This newly supported dedication allows museums and similar organisations to share their 3D data more openly, adding amazing 3D models to the Public Domain, many for the first time. This update also makes it even easier for 3D creators to download and reuse, re-imagine, and remix incredible ancient and modern artifacts, objects, and scenes.

We are equally proud to make this announcement in collaboration with 27 cultural organisations from 13 different countries. We are especially happy to welcome the Smithsonian Institution to Sketchfab as part of this initiative. The Smithsonian has uploaded their first official 3D models to Sketchfab as part of their newly launched open access program.

This announcement is only just the start of Sketchfab’s support for CC0—we expect and invite more institutions to add 3D models to the public domain via the CC0 dedication in the future. If you work at a museum, gallery, or archive and want help dedicating your organisation’s 3D models to the Public Domain, please get in touch.

Sketchfab + Creative Commons

In 2014, Sketchfab adopted Creative Commons Attribution licenses for the newly introduced download option. Since 2014, over 300,000 3D models have been made available by creators offering their work for reuse under these generous and standardised licenses. Attribution licenses allow people to reuse a 3D model under the condition that:
You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made – Attribution 4.0 International, creativecommons.org
With the introduction of the CC0 dedication for cultural heritage content, Sketchfab continues to foster ongoing artistic and academic reuse of 3D data under clear and easily understandable terms. The main difference between CC attribution licenses and the CC0 dedication is that under the CC0 dedication:
You can copy, modify, distribute and perform the work, even for commercial purposes, all without asking permission. – CC0 1.0 Universal, creativecommons.org
This means that 3D artists, filmmakers, VR & AR creatives, 3D print studios, brands, 3D hobbyists and everyone in between can dive right in and incorporate classic and ancient 3D data into their workflows—even for commercial purposes—without any need to credit the original creator.
See how 3D artists are already remixing cultural and historical 3D models in the collection below.
We’ve also added a post to the Sketchfab Forum with more information about what you can and can’t do with Public Domain 3D.

Supporting Open Access

Sketchfab’s implementation of CC0 dedication for 3D cultural heritage content is in harmony with the ongoing trend of open access policies that are being adopted by many of the world’s leading cultural organizations. With thousands of museums, libraries, art galleries, and archaeological projects already using Sketchfab to share their 3D data online, we want to make it easy for organisations to align their digital 3D collections with their open access policies.

We are especially grateful to our launch collaborators (listed below) and look forward to continuing this program with more organisations long into the future. For now, click a link below and dive right in to explore public domain 3D from any one of these amazing collections. Where a link takes you to a profile page, this indicates that the organisation in question has dedicated their entire collection (with maybe one or two exceptions) to the public domain.

Where is the Cuneiform?

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Where is the Cuneiform?
Cuneiform objects were bought and sold on the black market for decades and are still being sold. Many institutions of higher education in the United States acquired some of these objects, but there is no single database identifying all of them. In an effort to decolonize the field and reconstruct the pathways of these stolen objects, I have put together this list of institutions with cuneiform in their collections. But I need your help. If any of the information in this spreadsheet is incorrect or if there is an institution that I’ve missed, please use this form to let me know. Together we can find all of the cuneiform in the US.

Open Access Series: Varia Anatolica

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[First posted in AWOL 15 October 2016, updated 3 March 2020]

Varia Anatolica
http://www.persee.fr/renderCollectionCover/anatv.png
L'Institut Français d'Études Anatoliennes, fondé en 1930 sous le nom d'Institut Français d'Archéologie de Stamboul, se dota en 1933 d'une collection destinée à publier les travaux en archéologie de ses membres appelée Mémoires de l'Institut Français d'Archéologie de Stamboul. Doublée en 1935 par les Études orientales, qui accueillaient des travaux issus d'autres disciplines, ces deux collections fusionnèrent en 1959. La Bibliothèque Archéologique et Historique de l'Institut Français d'Archéologie de Stamboul perdura jusqu'en 1976, année où elle fut rebaptisée Bibliothèque de l'Institut Français d'Études Anatoliennes, s'adaptant ainsi à la nouvelle dénomination. Dans le courant des années 80, la diversité des recherches menées à l'IFEA liée au développement du département d'études contemporaines décide le directeur à (re)créer des collections à orientation disciplinaire. Successivement, Varia Turcica (1985) pour les études turques, Varia Anatolica et la revue Anatolia Antiqua (1988), pour l'archéologie anatolienne voient le jour et sont suivies en 1991 par la création d'Anatolia Moderna, revue annuelle d'histoire qui connut 10 numéros.

Varia Anatolica publie monographies, catalogues, ouvrages collectifs ou actes de colloques en archéologie anatolienne, de la Préhistoire à l'époque seldjoukide. Sa version en ligne est diffusée en accès intégral sur le portail Persée avec un embargo de 2 ans et sa version imprimée est diffusée par la librairie De Boccard à Paris.

    Katz Center Fellow Jacqueline Vayntrub on the Revitalization of Philology, Biblical Poetics, and Generational Dynamics in Biblical Authorship

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    Katz Center Fellow Jacqueline Vayntrub on the Revitalization of Philology, Biblical Poetics, and Generational Dynamics in Biblical Authorship
    March 03, 2020
    by Jacqueline Vayntrub 
    This blog post is part of a series focused on the research of current fellows. In this edition, Katz Center Director Steven Weitzman sits down with Jacqueline Vayntrub, whose work examines practices of knowledge transmission in biblical and ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean narratives.
    Steven P. Weitzman (SPW): It’s a distinctive pleasure to have this chance to ask you a few questions about your work because you and I have tackled some overlapping areas in our research and share some interpretive sensibilities, and yet you think in ways that go beyond the limits of my thinking. I appreciate having my mind challenged and opened in that way.
    Your recently published book, Beyond Orality, begins with a quote from Johann Gottfried Herder that all poetry has its origin in speech. What did he mean by that, and how does your work challenge that claim as it applies to biblical poetry?
    Jacqueline Vayntrub (JV):It’s a privilege to speak with you—and in particular, I don’t think enough of these conversations happen in our field, but I think we stand to learn much by looking at our objects of study through the questions of others. One interesting paradox of the classic model of the “biblical philologist”—the scholar of biblical texts and language—is that this model is marked by a deeply held value for uncovering the text’s singular origin story. But at the same time, this value is accompanied by the goal of arriving at the “true” or “singular” reading of the text. This often means that one’s interpretation is construed in competitive terms, to render itself superior to all previous readings. This kind of socialization makes it both difficult to recognize the effect one’s own time and place has on their work—how we too are products of history—and to see the value in the intellectual engagements others have had with these same texts, to understand where they are coming from.
    I decided to open the book with Herder’s voice because, recognized or not, his thinking on ancient textualized language and what it can tell us about culture has had an outsized effect not only on our area of study, but on other fields such as philosophy, comparative literature, and history, to name a few. And, in fact, the Hebrew Bible is a unique locus of inquiry in that its study leads us down varied paths. It leads us from the ancient Near East and the birth of writing, to the role of the Bible’s interpretation in early modern self-fashioning and political theory, to contemporary challenges, to orientalism and colonialism. Herder’s statement, that all poetry has its origins in speech, captures much of the Bible’s role in a persistent way of thinking about the deep past—as both powerful in its truth but primitive in its articulation—and how we consider ourselves in relation to that past. Herder’s statement is also complicated by the fact that we do not have transcripts of ancient Israelite singing but a textualized anthology. And yet Herder’s statement is also profoundly resonant for a reading of the biblical text, since the narratives in the Hebrew Bible have painted a picture of their own past as one punctuated by poetry and song. The task I wanted to set before me was to reconcile these dissonant phenomena—the perception of poetry as a kind of emotive, less rational literature that comes before the development of prose; biblical poetry as it comes to us in written texts; and the role poetry plays as character speech in the Hebrew Bible.

    SPW: In my work on related topics, I was under the sway of my dissertation advisor James Kugel, who challenged how scholars distinguished between prose and poetry in the Bible, and argued that the application of the category of poetry to the Bible is anachronistic, a projection of a later Hellenized literary category onto biblical texts that has distorted what scholars and translators understand them to mean. Do you share his challenge to the idea of biblical poetry? If you accept poetry as a non-anachronistic category for the Bible, what is it exactly? What are its defining characteristics or what distinguishes it from prose?\
     JV: Kugel’s observation in that regard is a rather important one. The study of biblical poetry has long relied on Greek-inflected literary categories, and yet genre categories and rhetorical principles native to the Greek tradition do not correspond neatly to many of the categories and principles that underlie the biblical texts. But perhaps the question of what in the Bible is poetry and what is prose obscures a more fundamental problem that we face as biblical scholars. The language we speak as scholars is deeply indebted to forms of intellectual expression that go back to fifth century BCE Athens. One of my goals in the book was to show how our reliance on this intellectual tradition fails to account for the different ways in which the biblical literary tradition reflected upon itself in its compositional practices. Biblical literature did not develop a theoretical and critical language—or at least, a language that is recognizable from a Greek-inflected system of literary categorization and evaluation. For that reason, the ways in which biblical authors theorized and challenged generic boundaries will necessarily look distinct from how Plato or Aristotle theorized their own literary tradition. Instead of developing an external critical apparatus, the biblical authors participated in literary criticism within their craft, reshaping genres, themes, devices, and patterns of expression. A deeper understanding of the biblical literary tradition can be gained through mapping rhetorical strategies across genres, including poetry, prophecy, wisdom, and law. A simple answer to the question of what characterizes biblical poetry is that those texts we frequently identify as poetry, with its recognizable rhythm and patterns of organization, are speeches attributed to characters and often given in their narrated voice. From that point, the questions—at least from my perspective—can widen from “How do these texts fit into our literary categories?” to “Why do these texts look the way they do?” and “Why is a character’s voice an important way to frame certain kinds of literature?” When you move towards those kinds of questions, you’ve created the distance necessary to defamiliarize the text and the world that created it—you allow antiquity to come back to life in a fuller and clearer way, not molded by our own values and assumptions.
    Click through for the rest of the dialogue.
     

    Open Access Journal: Euroclassica Newsletter

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     [First posted in AWOL 29 April 2016, update 3 March 2020]

     Euroclassica Newsletter
    Euroclassica Logo 



    Euroclassica, whose aims are pedagogical, cultural and scientific, has the following aims and objectives:
    a) to bring together all the associations of teachers of classical languages and civilisations in Europe and to promote their cooperation;
    b) to ensure the promotion and defence of the study of classical languages and civilisations, providing a unifying link and a powerful platform for cultural cohesion among European countries, especially through representation at international organisations;
    c) to assert publicly the contemporary relevance of classical languages and civilisations, and to highlight the pressing need to teach them, fully respecting the autonomy of each country;
    d) to encourage cooperation with associations outside Europe which have similar aims.
    • 2020 Euroclassica Newsletter

    • The Newsletter contains a lot of interesting and important information concerning the European basic languages Latin and Greek. Detailansicht
    • Newsletter Euroclassica 2020
    • 2019 Euroclassica Newsletter

    • The Newsletter contains a lot of interesting and important information concerning the European basic languages Latin and Greek. Detailansicht
    • Newsletter 2019
    • 2018 Euroclassica Newsletter


      The Newsletter contains a lot of interesting and important information concerning the European basic languages ​​Latin and Greek. Detailansicht
      Newsletter 2018
    • 2017 Euroclassica Newsletter

      The Newsletter contains a lot of interesting and important information concerning the European basic languages Latin and Greek. Detailansicht
      Newsletter 2017
    • EC Newsletter 2016

      The Newsletter contains a lot of interesting and important information concerning the European basic languages Latin and Greek. Detailansicht
      Newsletter 2016
    • 2015 Euroclassica Newsletter

      The Newsletter contains a lot of interesting and important information concerning the European basic languages Latin and Greek. Detailansicht
      Newsletter 2015
    • 2014 Euroclassica Newsletter

      The Newsletter contains a lot of interesting and important information concerning the European basic languages Latin and Greek.Detailansicht
      Newsletter 2014
    • 2013 Euroclassica Newsletter

      The Newsletter contains a lot of interesting and important information concerning the European basic languages Latin and Greek (1 MB). Detailansicht
      Newsletter 2013
    • 2012 Euroclassica Newsletter

      The Newsletter contains a lot of interesting and important information concerning the European basic languages Latin and Greek (0,8 MB). Detailansicht
      eduhi.at
    • 2011 Euroclassica Newsletter

      The Newsletter contains a lot of interesting and important information concerning the European basic languages Latin and Greek. (pdf; 1 MB) Detailansicht
      eduhi.at
    • 2010 Euroclassica Newsletter 2010: First details about the European Certificate for Classics/Vestibu

      The Newsletter contains a lot of interesting and important information concerning the European basic languages Latin and Greek. Detailansicht
      eduhi.at
    • 2009 Euroclassica Newsletter

      The Newsletter contains a lot of interesting and important information concerning the European basic languages Latin and Greek. Detailansicht
      eduhi.at
    • 2008 Euroclassica Newsletter

      The Newsletter contains a lot of interesting and important information concerning the European basic languages Latin and Greek. Detailansicht
    • 2007 Euroclassica Newsletter

      The Newsletter contains a lot of interesting and important information concerning the European basic languages Latin and Greek. Detailansicht
      eduhi.at
    • 2006 Euroclassica Newsletter

      The Newsletter contains a lot of interesting and important information concerning the European basic languages Latin and Greek. Detailansicht
      eduhi.at
    • 2005 Euroclassica Newsletter

      The Newsletter contains a lot of interesting and important information concerning the European basic languages Latin and Greek and many current issues. Detailansicht
      eduhi.at
    • 2002 Euroclassica Newsletter

      The Newsletter contains a lot of interesting and important information concerning the European basic languages Latin and Greek. Detailansicht
      eduhi.at
    • 2003 Euroclassica Newsletter

      The Newsletter contains a lot of interesting and important information concerning the European basic languages Latin and Greek. Detailansicht
      eduhi.at
    • 2004 Euroclassica Newsletter

      The Newsletter contains a lot of interesting and important information concerning the European basic languages Latin and Greek. You can read about the European classic network, the new homepage, the new European Curriculum etc. Detailansicht
      eduhi.at

    Open Access Journal: Bulletin of the History of Archaeology

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    [First posted in AWOL 10 December 2011. Updated 3 March 2020]

    Bulletin of the History of Archaeology
    ISSN: 2047-6930 (online)
    ISSN: 1062-4740 (print)

    The Bulletin of the History of Archaeology (BHA) was inaugurated nearly 19 years ago as a forum to exchange research, information on on-going projects, and resources solely devoted to the history of archaeology. Since that time it has become global in its reach and interests, but retains its focus on exchanging knowledge about the history of archaeology.

    Research Paper: Asia/Pacific

    Research Paper: Europe/Middle East

    And see AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies

    Open Access Journal: FOLD&R (Fasti On Line Documents & Research)

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    [First posted in AWOL 30 April 2012, updated 3 March 2020] 

    FOLD&R (Fasti On Line Documents & Research)
    ISSN: 1828-3179  (Italy Series)
    ISSN: 2412-5229 (Conservation Series)
    folder_cover

    FOLD&R is an archaeological journal published since 2004 by the International Association for Classical Archaeology in collaboration with the Italian Ministry for Cultural Heritage and Activities.
    The journal is dedicated to the proposition that reports on all excavations should be easily available to the general public. It is a peer-reviewed journal, with an editorial board that covers all of the archaeological disciplines. We welcome illustrated submissions, in English, Italian, French, Spanish or German, on recent Italian excavations or geophysical or surface surveys of individual sites. We guarantee a rapid review of the material, which, after any agreed changes, should be published within a month. Two sets of proofs will be submitted for correction by the authors. The reviewers are asked to address the scientific validity and presentation of the submission rather than the scale or importance of the excavation; all excavations are important. No translation is offered, but we are willing to advise on translators for anyone who wishes to publish their text in another language.
    An on-line journal follows the same rules as those on paper from both an academic and a juridical point of view. Publications on FOLD&R are thus valid from the point of view of a personal curriculum and should be cited just like other publications. The law protects the intellectual property of the author and the journal. Texts are published in a pdf format, and they can be consulted online, with Acrobat Reader, and downloaded for printing and circulation to colleagues. Texts can be republished by their authors (although only by the authors) without permission from the review; however, we request that the first publication be credited to FOLD&R.

    Texts and illustrations, in colour or black and white, should be sent to Helga Di Giuseppe, Piazza San Marco 49, Rome 00186 (tel. 39-06 68683399), or by email to helga.digiuseppe@aiac.org, The illustrations may be sent either as digital or paper files. If the site in question is not already part of the Fasti Online it must be accompanied by a completed Record Sheet

    We will register each FOLD&R article at the CNR central library, the Biblioteca Centrale “G. Marconi”, that has established a database, SOLAR, which registers the deposition of digital scientific publications. Registration and certification by the CNR guarantees the author and the preservation of the work. We assume that the authors of submissions will authorize the deposition of their texts. The authors will receive, via email, the certificate of deposition, which can be annexed to their own FOLD&R for distribution.
    FOLD&R Italy
    The 5 most recently published FOLD&Rs
  • 461 - Federica Boschi - Università di Bologna, Ilaria Venanzoni - Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici delle Marche, Vincenzo Baldoni - Università di Bologna, Michele Scalici, Università di Bologna, Michele Silani - Università di Bologna. 2020. Il progetto ArcheoNevola e la pianificazione di una scoperta: la tomba di un principe Piceno a Corinaldo (Ancona) . PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 460 - Mara Migliavacca, consulente scientifico Museo Civico “Domenico Dal Lago” di Valdagno; docente a contratto presso Università degli Studi di Padova, Dipartimento dei Beni Culturali.. 2020. Il sito di Uomo della Roccia (Muzzolon di Cornedo, Vicenza). Campagne 2015-2018 . PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 459 - Michelle Hobart, Alessandro Carabia . 2020. Excavation at Castellaraccio (Civitella-Paganico – GR) 2018. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 458 - Elena Chirico. 2020. La mansio di Hasta ad Alberese (GR, Toscana, Italia). PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
  • 457 - Adolfo Panarello. 2020. Note preliminari sui resti di una struttura muraria in opera poligonale di epoca repubblicana nel basamento della Chiesa di S. Bartolomeo – Frazione Sipicciano di Galluccio (Provincia di Caserta – Italia centro-meridionale) . PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
    • FOLD&R Archaeological Conservation Series

      The 5 most recently published FOLD&Rs
    • 5 - Albrecht Matthaei (Consulente Scienti co del PSPP), Anna Anguissola (Università di Pisa), Ralf Kilian (Fraunhofer IBP), Monica Martelli Castaldi (Consulente Restauratrice del PSPP), Sara Saba (Fraunhofer IBP), Erwin Emmerling, Prof. Dr. Daniele Malfitana (Istituto per i Beni Archeologici e Monumentali des CNR), Antonino Mazzaglia, Giovanni Leucci, Giovanni Fragalà, Lara De Giorgi, Danilo P. Pavone, Samuele Barone, Salvatore Russo. 2017. Pompeii Sustainable Preservation Project: i lavori del 2015 e il futuro del progetto. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
    • 4 - Alaa el Habashi, Tarik Moujoud, Abdessalam Zizouni. 2016. The Conservation and Reconstruction of the Islamic Bath at Volubilis, Morocco. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
    • 3 - Stefano De Caro. 2015. Excavation and conservation at Pompeii: a conflicted history.. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
    • 2 - Michele Asciutti. 2015. Restauro, riqualificazione e valorizzazione di aree di scavo archeologico: Valle del Colosseo/Palatino nord-orientale . PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
    • 1 - Sergio Palladino, Laura Bottiglieri. 2015. Ricostruzione e restituzione tridimensionale del corridoio e del viridarium della domus dei Valerii sul Celio, dagli scavi nell’Ospedale dell’Addolorata. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet

    • FOLD&R Archaeological Survey Series


      The 5 most recently published FOLD&Rs
    • 11 - Aomar Akerraz – Gaetano Palumbo – Abdelaziz El Khayari – Layla es-Sadra – Victoria Amoros-Ruiz – Abdeljalil Bouzouggar – Jose Cristobal Carvajal Lopez – Anke Lizbeth Cross – Abdallah Fili – Richard Fletcher – Fabio Parenti – Frank Stremke – Simone Belarmino – Fadoua Benjaâfar – Youssef Djellal – Mikel Herrán Subiñas – Devin Johnson – Hesham Moustafa Mohamed Nasr – Zayd Ouakrim – El Mehdi Sehasseh. 2020. The Transformation of the Moroccan Landscape in the Early Islamic Period. Preliminary report on the 2017-2018 fieldwork. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
    • 10 - Alberto Cazzella – Rachele Modesto –Vittorio Mironti – Claudia Sabbini – Enrico Lucci. 2019. L’ambiente montano appenninico tra Paleolitico medio ed età del Bronzo: nuovi dati dal “Molise Survey Project”. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
    • 9 - Federica Boschi (University of Bologna, Department of History and Cultures). 2018. Filling in the gaps: half-hidden pre-Roman settlements in the northern Marche (Italy). PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
    • 8 - Francesco Martorella. 2018. Tracce di urbanizzazione nella vallata mediana della città di Eraclea. PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
    • 7 - Linda R. Gosner – Alexander J. Smith. 2018. Landscape Use and Local Settlement at the Nuraghe S’Urachi (West-Central Sardinia): Results from the First Two Seasons of Site Survey (2014-2015). PDFpermalinkRecord Sheet
    •  See also FASTI

      Communicating the Past in the Digital Age: Proceedings of the International Conference on Digital Methods in Teaching and Learning in Archaeology (12th-13th October 2018)

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      Communicating the Past in the Digital Age: Proceedings of the International Conference on Digital Methods in Teaching and Learning in Archaeology (12th-13th October 2018)
      Sebastian Hageneuer (ed.)
      Recent developments in the field of archaeology are not only progressing archaeological fieldwork but also changing the way we practise and present archaeology today. As these digital technologies are being used more and more every day on excavations or in museums, this also means that we must change the way we approach teaching and communicating archaeology as a discipline. The communication of archaeology is an often neglected but ever more important part of the profession. Instead of traditional lectures and museum displays, we can interact with the past in various ways. Students of archaeology today need to learn and understand these technologies, but can on the other hand also profit from them in creative ways of teaching and learning. The same holds true for visitors to a museum.
      This volume presents the outcome of a two-day international symposium on digital methods in teaching and learning in archaeology held at the University of Cologne in October 2018 addressing exactly this topic. Specialists from around the world share their views on the newest developments in the field of archaeology and the way we teach these with the help of archaeogaming, augmented and virtual reality, 3D reconstruction and many more. Thirteen chapters cover different approaches to teaching and learning archaeology in universities and museums and offer insights into modern-day ways to communicate the past in a digital age.

      Open Accesss Journal: Aitia. Regards sur la culture hellénistique au XXIème siècle

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       [First posted in AWOL 30 May 2012, updated 4 March 2020]

      Aitia. Regards sur la culture hellénistique au XXIème siècle
      ISSN electronic edition: 1775-4275
      Aitia. Regards sur la culture hellénistique au XXIe siècle est une revue internationale électronique. Elle s'intéresse à l’ensemble de la culture hellénistique. Cette revue entend favoriser les approches croisées entre les domaines de la recherche, en particulier la littérature et la philosophie. L’émergence à Athènes et à Rome des grandes écoles et traditions philosophiques de la période ne peut être considérée indépendamment de son contexte culturel. Inversement, on voit une philosophie popularisée prendre une place toujours plus grande dans l’ensemble de la vie culturelle et influencer souvent fortement la production littéraire.
      La revue Aitia entend avoir une vocation internationale : elle publie des articles en différentes langues (notamment : français, anglais, italien, allemand, espagnol, grec moderne…) ; elle entend favoriser particulièrement les contributions de jeunes chercheurs. La publication des articles est soumise à l’accord d’un comité de lecture scientifique également international.

      Le bouvier dans la poésie hellénistique et le roman grec

      Cowherds in Hellenistic Poetry and Greek Novel
      Il bovaro nella poesia ellenistica e il romanzo greco
      Sous la direction de Jérôme Bastick, Christophe Cusset et Claire Vieilleville
      Dans la poésie bucolique, le bouvier est avec les autres pâtres un personnage essentiel et éminent – à partir de la figure légendaire et fondatrice de Daphnis. La présence du bouvier ne se limite toutefois pas à cet univers générique précis, on le voit peupler l’espace de différents autres genres littéraires depuis Homère et la poésie archaïque.
      Les textes réunis dans ce volume mettent en relation deux représentations concurrentes du bouvier dans la poésie hellénistique et dans le roman de l’époque impériale; ils visent à mettre en lumière les potentialités poétiques, dramatiques et anthropologiques de cette figure pastorale.
      In bucolic poetry, the cowherd is with the other herdsmen an essential and eminent character—starting with the legendary and founding figure of Daphnis. But the presence of the cowherd is not limited to this precise generic universe, but he is also populating the space of various other literary genres since Homer and archaic poetry.
      The texts in this volume relate two competing representations of the cowherd in Hellenistic poetry and in the novel of the imperial period; they aim to highlight the poetic, dramatic and anthropological potentialities of this pastoral figure.
      A partire da Daphnis, figura leggendaria e fondatrice, il bovaro è, insieme agli altri pastori, un personaggio essenziale ed eminente nella poesia bucolica. Tuttavia, la presenza del bovaro non si limita soltanto a questo preciso ambito letterario, ma si estende a vari altri generi dopo Omero e la poesia arcaica.
      I testi raccolti in questo volume mettono in relazione due rappresentazioni contrapposte del pastore nella poesia ellenistica e nel romanzo di età imperiale; essi mirano ad evidenziare le potenzialità poetiche, drammatiche e antropologiche di questa figura.

      Open Access Journal: The Journal of Ancient Egyptian Architecture

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      [First posted in AWOL 20 December 2016, updated 4 March 2020]

      The Journal of Ancient Egyptian Architecture
      ISSN: 2472-999X
      The Journal of Ancient Egyptian Architecture is a scientific, open access and annual periodical. Its purpose is to promote the publication of research devoted to Ancient Egyptian architecture (domestic, civil, military, ritual/religious and funerary), from the Predynastic Period to the Roman imperial era, whatever the modern geographical context (Egypt, Sudan, Near East, etc). The subject scope includes everything relating to construction, regardless of its original importance or purpose.

      The journal publishes fieldwork reports and studies undertaken in the Egyptological tradition, including discussions of epigraphy and iconography, but also work that utilizes specific skills such as structural and materials sciences, or modern investigative techniques. In this way, JAEA seeks to encourage the development of detailed technical descriptions, and deeply theorized understanding (of architectural symbolism, propaganda, climatic and geological influences, etc.). This interdisciplinary approach will help connect adjacent areas of expertise which, alone, could not reflect the richness and complexity of the Ancient Egyptian built heritage.

      The periodical welcomes any study that meets any one of these goals, only on the condition that the formatting and content of articles are subject to JAEA scientific publication requirements.

      2020

      A new survey of the upper chambers of Snefru’s pyramids at Dahshur (p. 1)

      Franck Monnier

      This article presents a new survey of the corbelled chambers within Snefru’s Bent and Red pyramids at Dahshur, based on photogrammetry work carried out by French company Iconem in 2018. As a consultant to the project, the author was involved in the research design and gave the company guidance on where to focus their efforts to optimize data acquisition and survey effectiveness. Once the data was processed, an analysis of the architecture was carried out and is reported here for the first time. The site survey history including pre-existing reports for the spaces of interest are first reviewed. The 3-dimensional digital models of the interior spaces are then analyzed. High-quality photogrammetry images from the project are presented here, along with new diagrams and a new description of the formation history of the funerary chambers.

      Published 21 December 2019 1630 Views 328 Downloads

      An animal embalming complex at Saqqara (p. 19)

      Tatjana Beuthe

      This paper is a new examination of the original find context of the Saqqara lion tables (CG 1321–2) in ‘Gallery C’, an underground structure in the Step Pyramid complex. The substructure may date to the 1st millennium BCE, and this structure was likely part of an embalming complex for the Apis or other sacred animals. The adjacent Western Galleries were probably re-used during this period as an animal necropolis.

      Published 26 January 2020 929 Views 107 Downloads

      Moving heaven and earth for Khufu: Were the Trial Passages at Giza components of a rudimentary stellar observatory? (p. 29)

      David I. Lightbody

      This article describes a digital archaeological experiment to test a new hypothesis that explains the purpose and unusual form of the so-called Trial Passages at Giza. The enigmatic connected passages are carved into the bedrock on the east side of the Great Pyramid of Khufu and have been interpreted in various ways over the decades since they were first cleared. Based on a new analysis of their design, it is proposed here that they could serve very well as a place from which to observe the northern stars. Prolonged and accurate measurement of the stars of the circumpolar region of the northern sky could have been made from inside the main inclined passage, which rises from south to north. Accurate location of the Northern Celestial Pole (NCP) during these observations could have facilitated the accurate cardinal alignment of sides of the Great Pyramid. Other details of the architecture support this interpretation, and are set out here for consideration.

      Published 28 February 2020 535 Views 112 Downloads


      The results of the 2019 Digital Humanities Awards have been announced

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      The results of the 2019 Digital Humanities Awards have been announced

      I list below awards going to projects dealing with the Ancient World. For the full list follow the link above. Congratulations to all!

       AWOL was a winner for 2015:
      DHAwards2015-blog

      ANS News: 270 hoard documents and 60 authorites added to the ANS Archives

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      270 hoard documents and 60 authorites added to the ANS Archives
      In a major digital archival publication today, 270 documents pertaining to Greek coin hoards have been added into the ANS Digital Archives, Archer, and 60 new archival authorities have been added into the ANS Biographies (EAC-CPF records published in xEAC). These authorities include numerous prominent numismatists, archaeologists, dealers, and collectors, as well as some individuals who are not prominent--people only attested through our archives and a scant provenance records from other museums. Each of these authorities will be created or updated in the Social Networks and Archival Context (SNAC) project, along with links back to our archival records.

      A nice example is Sir Arthur Evans, the famous archaeologist of Knossos. He is mentioned in several letters between Sidney Noe and other scholars. Although Evans is not a prominent scholar in our own archives, his papers are held in other institutions. We are able to make our few letters more broadly available to researchers interested in Arthur Evans through SNAC.

      The record for Arthur Evans, with links to hoard documents.

      The archival documents themselves represent the first portion of a larger collection of scanned letters, invoices, inventories, notes, hoard photographs, and other research materials related to The Inventory of Greek Coin Hoards and subsequent Coin Hoards volumes. Coin Hoards will be published online in the near future, after we migrate the old IGCH platform into a completely new database system that operated more like Coin Hoards of the Roman Republic.

      The display of IGCH 140, with new archival documents

      Under the hood, these archival records are TEI documents generated from spreadsheet metadata entered by Peter van Alfen. The images are IIIF-compliant and follow the procedures we have already established with Edward T. Newell's research notebooks. The Archer framework, EADitor, was updated to accommodate other types of archival materials represented as TEI (manuscripts, etc.), and EADitor is capable of serializing these files directly into RDF for Archer's SPARQL endpoint (that drives the interconnectivity between the authority records and archival items, as well as the display of archival items in MANTIS and IGCH). Additionally, the TEI files, and TEI-encoded annotations, are serialized dynamically into IIIF manifests.

      Because all TEI files use the same annotation system in the back-end of EADitor (Masahide Kanzaki's Image Annotator: https://www.kanzaki.com/works/2016/pub/image-annotator), these new archival documents can be annotated with URIs from Nomisma.org, coins in our collection, coin types or monograms in PELLA or other corpora. As a proof of concept, I annotated the names of Mithradates VI and Lysimachus with their respective Nomisma URIs on the notes of Wayte Raymond about IGCH 973: http://numismatics.org/archives/ark:/53695/igch973.001. These annotations, stored natively in TEI surface elements within a facsimile, are serialized into JSON-LD according to the IIIF spec in real time, and displayed at the link above in Mirador. The names are also listed in the index below the Mirador viewer.

      While we still have more metadata to enter for more archival documents, the data-entry workflow and processing scripts are fully established at this stage. This is the next step in transforming the IGCH database into a more comprehensive research platform for Greek coin hoards.

      Open Access Journal: MUSE: The Annual of the Museum of Art and Archaeology, University of Missouri

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      MUSE: The Annual of the Museum of Art and Archaeology, University of Missouri 
      ISSN 0077-2194
      Volume 52, 2018
      MUSE, Volume 52, 2018
      Volume 51, 2017
      MUSE, Volume 51, 2017
      Volume 50, 2016
      MUSE, Volume 50, 2016
      Volume 49, 2015
      MUSE, Volume 49, 2015
      Volume 48, 2014
      MUSE, Volume 48, 2014
      Volume 47, 2013
      MUSE, Volume 47, 2013
      Volume 46, 2012
      MUSE, Volume 46, 2012
      Volumes 44 & 45, 2010–2011
      MUSE, Volumes 44 & 45, 2010–2011
      Volume 43, 2009
      MUSE, Volume 43, 2009
      Volume 42, 2008
      MUSE, Volume 42, 2008
      Volumes 39, 40, & 41
      Volumes 39, 40, & 41, 2005-2007
      Volumes 36, 37 & 38
      MUSE, Volumes 36, 37 & 38, 2002-2004
      Volumes 33, 34 & 35
      MUSE, Volumes 33, 34 & 35, 1999–2001
      Volumes 31 & 32
      MUSE, Volumes 31 & 32, 1997–1998
      Volumes 29 & 30
      MUSE, Volumes 29 & 30, 1995–1996
      Volumes 27 & 28
      MUSE, Volumes 27 & 28, 1993–1994
      Volume 26
      MUSE, Volume 26, 1992
      Volume 25
      MUSE, Volume 25, 1991
      Volume 23 & 24
      MUSE, Volume 23 & 24, 1989–1990
      Volume 22
      MUSE, Volume 22, 1988
      Volume 21
      MUSE, Volume 21, 1987
      Volume 20
      MUSE, Volume 20, 1986
      Volume 19
      MUSE, Volume 19, 1985
      Volume 18
      MUSE, Volume 18, 1984
      Volume 17
      MUSE, Volume 17, 1983
      Volume 16
      MUSE, Volume 16, 1982
      Volume 15
      MUSE, Volume 15, 1981
      Volume 14
      MUSE, Volume 14, 1980
      Volume 13
      MUSE, Volume 13, 1979
      Volume 12
      MUSE, Volume 12, 1978
      Volume 11
      MUSE, Volume 11, 1977
      Volume 10
      MUSE, Volume 10, 1976
      Volume 9
      MUSE, Volume 9, 1975
      Volume 8
      MUSE, Volume 8, 1974
      Volume 7
      MUSE, Volume 7, 1973
      Volume 6
      MUSE, Volume 6, 1972
      Volume 5
      MUSE, Volume 5, 1971
      Volume 4
      MUSE, Volume 4, 1970
      Volume 3
      MUSE, Volume 3, 1969
      Volume 2
      MUSE, Volume 2, 1968
      Volume 1
      MUSE, Volume 1, 1967

       

      Société, économie, administration dans le Code Théodosien

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      Société, économie, administration dans le Code Théodosien
      Société, économie, administration dans le Code Théodosien
      En 429 ap. J.-C., Théodose II, qui règne alors à Constantinople, décide de réaliser un recueil des lois émises depuis Constantin. Promulgué en 438, le Code Théodosien entre en vigueur en janvier 439. Source précieuse pour l’histoire de l’Antiquité tardive, ce code, qui rassemble plus de 2 500 constitutions, n’a cependant jamais fait l’objet d’une traduction française, une tâche de longue haleine à laquelle s’est attelé un groupe de savants français.
      Les multiples problèmes que pose le Th...


      Lire la suite
      • Éditeur : Presses universitaires du Septentrion
      • Collection : Histoire et civilisations
      • Lieu d’édition : Villeneuve d'Ascq
      • Année d’édition : 2012
      • Publication sur OpenEdition Books : 04 mars 2020
      • EAN (Édition imprimée) : 9782757403921
      • EAN électronique : 9782757421734
      • Nombre de pages : 560 p.
      Sylvie Crogiez-Pétrequin et Pierre Jaillette
      Introduction

      Open Access Journal: Birmingham Egyptology Journal

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      [First posted in AWOL 2 March 2018, updated 5 March 2020]

      Birmingham Egyptology Journal
      ISSN: 2053-3586
      http://birminghamegyptology.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/BELogo2-150x150.png
      Birmingham Egyptology Journal is a peer-reviewed scholarly journal available only online and free of charge.
      The journal offers a platform for the presentation of research relating to ancient Egyptian culture, history, and archaeology from the Pre-dynastic to Graeco-Roman Periods.
      The Journal officially launched on March 14, 2013 with the first articles being published online shortly thereafter. It is intended that articles will be presented as the review and publication processes are completed with the total submissions for each calendar year comprising one volume. Further information for prospective contributors to the Journal is available from the drop-down menu of the ‘Journal’ head on this page.
      Birmingham Egyptology Journal, Department of Classics and Ancient History, Room 304, Arts Building, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT. 
      Submissions and enquiries should be forwarded to: editor@birminghamegyptology.co.uk

      Volume 6: 2018      
      1. Review
      Carla Gallorini
      Review of S. Wallace Jones. Egyptian and Imported Pottery from the Red Sea Port of Mersa Gawasis, Egypt
      To reference this article we suggest:
      Gallorini, C. 2018. Review of S. Wallace-Jones. Egyptian and Imported Pottery from the Red Sea Port of Mersa Gawsis, Egypt. Archaeopress Egyptology 20, Archaeopress Publishing, Oxford. 2018. Birmingham Egyptology Journal 6: 1-5.

      Volume 5: 2017
      1. Article
      The Transition between the Twentieth and Twenty-First Dynasties Revisited
      Ian Mladjov
      To reference this article we suggest:
      Mladjov, I. 2017.’ The Transition between the Twentieth and Twenty-First Dynasties Revisited’. Birmingham Egyptology Journal 5: 1-23.

      2. Review
      Steven R. W. Gregory
      Review of S. Ikram (ed.). Divine Creatures: Animal Mummies in Ancient Egypt
      To reference this article we suggest:
      Gregory, S. R. W. 2017. Review of S. Ikram (ed.). Divine Creatures: Animal Mummies in Ancient Egypt. The American University in Cairo Press: Cairo. 2015.  Birmingham Egyptology Journal 5: 24-26.

      Occasional publication 3, 2016. Conference Proceedings
      Proceedings of the Third Birmingham Egyptology Symposium, University of Birmingham, 19th February 2016
      Edited by Steven R. W. Gregory.
      Elliot, C. ‘Pyramisks and Obelids – Pitch Imperfect? The reception of ancient Egyptian architectural elements in pre-nineteenth century Europe’. 1-18.  
      Scott, M. ‘The blundered name of Khufu’: Ancient identity and modern identification’. 19-28.


      Volume 4: 2016
      1. Review
      Review of A. Dodson. Afterglow of Empire: Egypt from the fall of the New Kingdom to the Saite renaissance
      Steven R. W. Gregory
      To reference this article we suggest:
      Gregory, S. R. W. 2016. Review of A. Dodson. Afterglow of Empire: Egypt from the fall of the New Kingdom to the Saite renaissance. The American University in Cairo Press: Cairo  New York. 2012. Birmingham Egyptology Journal 4: 1-4.

      2. Review
      Review of A. Stevenson (ed.) The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology: Characters and Collections
      Stephanie L. Boonstra
      To reference this article we suggest:
      Boonstra, S. L. 2016. Review of A. Stevenson (ed.). The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology: Characters and Collections. UCL Press: London. 2015. Birmingham Egyptology Journal 4: 5-9.

      3. Article
      Texts and Iconography of Padiamun’s Coffin in the Liverpool Museum
      Luca Miatello
      To reference this article we suggest:
      Miatello, L. 2016. ‘Texts and Iconography of Padiamun’s Coffin in the Liverpool Museum’. Birmingham Egyptology Journal 4: 10-61.

      Occasional publication 2, 2016. Conference Proceedings
      Proceedings of the Second Birmingham Egyptology Symposium, University of Birmingham, 20th February 2015
      Edited by Steven R. W. Gregory.
      Hufft, B. E. ‘The Kushite kings of the Twenty-fifth Dynasty in the light of Transcultural Studies: an iconographic approach’. 1-20.
      Sidpura, T. ‘Where is my Mummy…Who is my Mummy? A Re-Evaluation of the Dra Abu-el Naga Coffin of Queen Ahhotep (CG 28501) with Queen Satkamose’. 21-46.
      Simmance, E. ‘The authority behind statues and the authority of statues: sistrophores and intermediaries’. 47-66.

      Volume 3: 2015
      1. Review
      Review of S. Wachsmann 2013. The Gurob  Ship-Cart Model and Its Mediterranean Context
      Marsia Sfakianou Bealby
      To reference this article we suggest:
      Bealby, M. S. 2015. Review of S. Wachsmann. The Gurob Ship-Cart Model and Its Mediterranean Context. Texas A & M University Press: College Station, Texas. 2013. Birmingham Egyptology Journal 3: 1-4.

      2. Review
      Review of D. Gange 2013. Dialogues with the Dead: Egyptology in British Culture and Religion, 1822-1922
      Steven R. W. Gregory
      To reference this article we suggest:
      Gregory, S. R. W. 2015. Review of D. Gange. Dialogues with the Dead: Egyptology in British Culture and Religion, 1822-1922. Oxford University Press: Oxford. 2013. Birmingham Egyptology Journal 3: 5-8.

      3. Article
      The Two Inner Directions of the Ancient Egyptian Script
      Carlos Gracia Zamacona
      To reference this article we suggest:
      Zamacona, C. G. 2015.’ The Two Inner Directions of the Ancient Egyptian Script’. Birmingham Egyptology Journal 3: 9-23.

      4. Article
      The encounter between the sun and the moon on hypocephali
      Gyula Priskin
      To reference this article we suggest:
      Priskin, G. 2015. ‘The encounter between the sun and the moon on hypocephali’. Birmingham Egyptology Journal 3: 24-41.

      Occasional publication 1, 2014. Conference Proceedings
      Proceedings of the First Birmingham Egyptology Symposium, University of Birmingham, 21st February 2014
      Edited by Steven R. W. Gregory.
      Simmance, E. ‘The significance of location for the mediating statues of Amenhotep son of Hapu’. 1-13.
      Asbury, B. L. ‘Pitt-Rivers, the Painter and the Palaeolithic Period’. 14-22.
      Godefroid, A. ‘Book of the Dead Chapter 182: a case of related structure between the text and its vignette’. 23-34.
      Mushett Cole, E. ‘Did the political upheaval during the Late Bronze Age cause a change in the form of Egyptian control in the Levant? An analysis of the changes in the political landscape of the Levant during the late New Kingdom’. 35-44.



      Volume 2: 2014
      1. Article
       The High Priests of Amun at the End of the Twentieth Dynasty
      Jennifer Palmer
      To reference this article we suggest:
      Palmer, J. 2014. ‘The High Priests of Amun at the End of the Twentieth Dynasty’. Birmingham Egyptology Journal 2: 1-22.
      2. Article
      A map of Egypt reconstructed from the description of the country at Edfu
      Gyula Priskin
      To reference this article we suggest:
      Priskin, G. 2014. ‘A map of Egypt reconstructed from the description of the country at Edfu’. Birmingham Egyptology Journal 2: 23-41.
      3. Review
      Review of J. A. Hill, P. Jones, and A. J. Morales (eds.) 2013. Experiencing Power, Generating Authority: Cosmos, Politics, and the Ideology of Kingship in Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia
      Steven R. W. Gregory
      To reference this article we suggest:
      Gregory, S. R. W. 2014. Review of J. A. Hill, P. Jones, and A. J. Morales (eds.). Experiencing Power, Generating Authority: Cosmos, Politics, and the Ideology of Kingship in Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia. University of Pennsylvania Press: Philadelphia. 2013. Birmingham Egyptology Journal 2: 42-46.

      Volume 1: 2013
      1. Object Highlight
      Eton College Myers Collection of Egyptian Antiquities Object Highlight – ECM822, A Faience Nubian Head
      Carl Graves
      To reference this article we suggest:
      Graves, C. 2013. ‘Eton College Myers Collection Object Highlight: A Faience Nubian Head’. Birmingham Egyptology Journal 1: 1-4.
       2. Article
      Piankh and Herihor: Art, Ostraca, and Accession in Perspective
      Steven R. W. Gregory
      To reference this article we suggest:
      Gregory, S. R. W. 2013. ‘Piankh and Herihor: Art, Ostraca, and Accession in Perspective’. Birmingham Egyptology Journal 1: 5-18.
      3. Review
      Review of J.  Padgham 2012. A New Interpretation of the Cone on the Head in New Kingdom Tomb Scenes.
      Eleanor B. Simmance
      To reference this article we suggest:
      Simmance, E. B. 2013. Review of J. Padgham. A New Interpretation of the Cone on the Head in New Kingdom Tomb Scenes. BAR International Series. Archaeopress: Oxford. 2012. Birmingham Egyptology Journal 1: 19-21.
      4. Review
      Review of Raven, Verschoor, Vugts and Walsem 2011. The Memphite Tomb of Horemheb. Commander in Chief of Tutankhamun. V. The forecourt and the area south of the tomb with some notes on the tomb of Tia
      Gabrielle Heffernan
      To reference this article we suggest:
      Heffernan, G. 2013. Review of M. Raven, V. Verschoor, M. Vugts and R. Walsem. The Memphite Tomb of Horemheb. Commander in Chief of Tutankhamun. V. The forecourt and the area south of the tomb with some notes on the tomb of Tia. Brepols 2011. Birmingham Egyptology Journal 1: 22-24.
       5. Article
      Coffin Texts Spell 155 on the Moon
      Gyula Priskin
      To reference this article we suggest:
      Priskin, G. 2013. ‘Coffin Texts Spell 155 on the Moon’. Birmingham Egyptology Journal 1: 25-63.

      Open Access Journal: Revista Numismática Hécate

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      [First posted in AWOL 25 December 2015, updated 6 March 2020]

      Revista Numismática Hécate
      ISSN: 2386-8643
      http://www.revista-hecate.org/files/6914/0061/5046/logo.jpg

      ¡Bienvenidos todos a la nueva revista de numismática Hécate!

      La revista Hécate debe su nombre a la diosa griega tricéfala, que representa las diferentes formas de entender el mundo y el ser humano en su necesidad de transmitir Historia. Así Hécate nos muestra una encrucijada de conocimientos, de nuevos caminos y tendencias que debemos recorrer; senderos que nos llevarán a comprender y abordar el saber desde una perspectiva libre y globalizadora en esta nueva época de cambio y tecnología.

      Número 6 (2019)

      ARTÍCULOS
      • Ponderales procedentes de El Raso (Candeleda, Ávila): una aproximación analítica y contextualBarrios Rodríguez, Diego y González Hernández, Pablo (pp. 1-16) 
      • Monedas de cecas fenicias y libiofenicias procedentes de Suel (Fuengirola, Málaga)
      García Carretero, Juan Ramón, Martín Ruiz, Juan Antonio y Carcedo Rozada, Marcelino (pp. 17-37)
      • Las dracmas ligeras de Emporion
      Amela Valverde, Luis (pp. 38-55)
      • Sobre la(s) era(s) de Pompeyo
      Amela Valverde, Luis (pp. 56-76)
      • Una aproximación al mercado de la moneda augustea y sus variablesLabrador Ballestero, Patricia y Vico Belmonte, Ana (pp. 77-87)
      • Acerca del reverso VENVS FELIX en las monedas acuñadas en Roma a nombre de SeverinaOliveto, Fabián, Blanco, Santiago y Paniagua, Eric (pp. 88-95)
      • Las monedas de la villa romana de ‘Las Viñas’ (Cuevas del Becerro, Málaga)Ortiz Córdoba, José (pp. 96-121)
      • La figura histórica de Iudila a través de sus emisiones monetales: ¿rey o usurpador?
      Castillo Lozano, José Ángel (pp. 122-130)
      El acceso al oficio de monedero en León a mediados del s. XIV
      Roma Valdés, Antonio (pp. 131-135)
      • El cruzado de vellón de Enrique II y las acuñaciones de frontera. Tipos y cecas (1369 y 1373)Fuentes Ganzo, Eduardo (pp. 136-163)
      • Las primeras acuñaciones de la Nueva España a través del análisis de códicesMárquez Lorenzo, Emmanuel (pp. 164-176)
      • Dos troqueles de medalla en la historia de la Casa de Moneda de Santiago de Chile: la huella de Manuel TorresCastro Alfonso, Erea (pp. 177-189)
      • La producción de plata y la escasez de moneda en el norte de Nueva España en el siglo XVIII
      Cano Borrego, Pedro Damián (pp. 190-203)
      • Superintendentes administradores, ensayadores y grabadores en las cecas del Perú  virreinal (1800-1826)
       Álvarez Carrasco, Ricardo Iván (pp. 204-224)
      • Determinantes de la Prima de los Ecus españoles
       Santos, Juan Luis y González Sánchez, Francisco José (pp. 225-235)
      • 
      Posicionamiento y estado de las revistas numismáticas españolas en bases de datos científicas
      Vázquez Miraz, Pedro (pp. 236-246)
      RECENSIONES
      \

      • Número 5 (2018)

      Número 4 (2017)

      • Número 3 (2016)

      • Número 2 (2015)

      • Número 1 (2014)

      AWOL's list of Open Access Ancient Numismatics Journals
        
      AWOL's List of

      Open Access Journal: PalArch's Journal of Archaeology of Egypt / Egyptology

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       [First posted in AWOL 26 December 2013, updated 6 March 2020]

      PalArch's Journal of Archaeology of Egypt / Egyptology
      ISSN 1567-214X
      The PalArch Foundation publishes three journals: PalArch’s Journal of Archaeology of Egypt/Egyptology (PJAEE; ISSN 1567-214X), PalArch’s Journal of Vertebrate Palaeontology (PJVP; ISSN 1567-2158) and PalArch’s Journal of Archaeology of Northwest Europe (PJANE; ISSN 1573-3939). These are so-called ‘open access’, which means that the publiciations are freely availabe and can be downloaded by everyone (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_access_(publishing)). Note that the downloaded PDF publications are for personal use only: distribution is not permitted. Notifying third parties should be done by reference to the Foundation’s website www.PalArch.nl

      For detailed information on the journals, see the appropriate pages. The proceedings (ISSN 1567-2166; currently only related to Archaeology of Egypt/Egyptology) are an irregularly appearing publication. The Newsletter (ISSN 1872-4582) ceased to exist with the new website: items and news are published online in the News section.

      Archive for category PalArch's Journal of Archaeology of Egypt / Egyptolog
      Recent content includes:

      Janssen, Rosalind. 2020. The Pleated Dress of Nywty. – PalArch’s Journal of Archaeology of Egypt/Egyptology 17(1) (2020), 1-11. ISSN 1567-214X. 11 pages + 4 figures.

      A description of a fragment of a pleated dress, discovered in situ in 1982 by the late Peter Munro and his team in the tomb of Nywty. An evaluation of its importance for our understanding of pleated dresses in ancient Egypt. Download PDF file

      Yarmolovich, Victoria & Elena Chepel. 2019. Achaemenid Influence on Egyptian Pottery: New Evidence from Memphis. – PalArch’s Journal of Archaeology of Egypt/Egyptology 16(3) (2019), 1-27. ISSN 1567-214X. 27 pages + 7 figures, 3 tables.

      The authors analyse new pottery finds from recent excavations of the Centre for Egyptological Studies (Russian Academy of Sciences [CES RAS]) at Memphis. Three groups of archaeological material present particular interest for our discussion: 14 fragments of high-necked bowls, 33 beakers, and one table amphora. All these vessels were produced using Egyptian clays, but their […]

      Fradley, Michael & Servane Hardouin. 2019. Remote Sensing of Endangered Archaeology on Gebel Ataqah, Egypt. – PalArch’s Journal of Archaeology of Egypt/Egyptology 16(2) (2019), 1-21. ISSN 1567-214X. 21 pages + 9 figures.

      This paper reports on a recent survey of a range of archaeological sites on and around Gebel Ataqah, a mountain area to the west of Suez. These sites were identified through the analysis of publicly available satellite imagery, principally Google Earth (GE), as part of the Endangered Archaeology in the Middle East and North Africa […]

      Brichieri-Colombi, Stephen. 2019. The Ramp at Hatnub Quarry: No Solution for Pyramids. – PalArch’s Journal of Archaeology of Egypt/Egyptology 16(1) (2019), 1-21. ISSN 1567-214X. 21 pages + 10 figures, 5 tables.

      Certain features of the ramp first uncovered by the IFAO/University of Liverpool team in 2015 at the Old Kingdom alabaster quarry at Hatnub have been heralded as a model for ramps used in construction of the Great Pyramid of Giza. These features include a steep slope of up 20% (11⁰), inclined stairways on both sides […]

      The Getty Provenance Index®

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      The Getty Provenance Index®
      This vast collection of digital records is expanded and enriched on a regular basis. The quantity and scope of research material that is available varies by region, period, and type of document. These resources are currently accessible through two interfaces:


      Open Access Ancient Numismatics Journals

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      [First posted in AWOL 8 November 2011. Updated 6 March 2020]

      These are the open access eJournals focused on ancient numismatics of which I am aware.  Are there others?  Please let me know.