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ICONEA: International Council of Middle Eastern Archaeomusicology

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ICONEA: International Council of Middle Eastern Archaeomusicology
 
ICONEA is now the host of articles, videos and sound files from scholars and students.
Papers will be submitted as pdf files, or Word and compatible. There is no peer reviewing and no restrictions as to the size of the articles. ICONEA has an inclusive policy which aims at helping students, and scholars and not excluding them from having their work published. Videos will appear as links to YouTube, Vimeo, etc. Recordings will be provided as mp4 files and other similar formats. Scholars are invited to upload criticism of papers presented. Articles will be archived in this site until a reasonable amount of them can be assembled as a volume which will be published both OnLine and as Print On Demand format.
Therefore, we invite all scholars and students of Ancient Middle Eastern archaeomusicology to provide their articles.
All articles, soundfiles, video links, pictures, and criticism to be sent to both: rdumbrill@iconea.org and to patrick.h.huang@gmail.com
ICONEA is setting up an online and live yearly conference in order to avoid costs and reducing  the carbon load. More details will be given when available
Mosr recent articles:

Richard Dumbrill: A FLUTE OR NOT A FLUTE? THAT IS THE QUESTION

Open Access Journal: Boletín de Arqueología Experimental

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Boletín de Arqueología Experimental
e-ISSN: 2530-3554
ISSN print version: 1138-9354
Journal Homepage Image
The Bulletin of Experimental Archeology is a magazine born in 1997, with an annual periodicity. It is the result of the scientific activities and dissemination of knowledge that the Experimental Archeology Laboratory LAEX, under the Department of Prehistory and Archeology of the Autonomous University of Madrid, promotes and produces.

It is a journal of scientific and informative orientation related to the development of experimental works in the field of Archeology and History open to all kinds of works that fall into this subjects. Among others, its objectives pretend to extent part of the scientific and teaching activity of this discipline directed preferably to scientific and academic world. The Bulletin of Experimental Archeology does not require authors to make any payment for publishing their articles in it.


The Journal provides open access to the content it publishes. This policy is based on the principle of free consultation in order to favor research and teaching. Therefore, no subscription is necessary to access its content.

2018



2017

Núm. 12 (2017)





















1997

No 1 (1997)


Des Anciens et des Modernes

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Des Anciens et des Modernes
Des Anciens et des Modernes
Extrait
Le principal thème de la recherche soviétique en histoire ancienne est, depuis 1960, l’esclavage dans la société antique. En effet, le plan septennal adopté en 1960 par l’institut d’histoire de l’Académie des Sciences d’URSS prévoyait une vaste histoire de l’esclavage conçue comme « une série de monographies scientifiques (…) donnant dans leur ensemble (…) un tableau complet (…) de l’apparition, du développement et de la destruction du mode de production esclavagiste dans le monde antique ...

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Note de l’éditeur

Ouvrage publié avec le concours du C.N.R.S.
  • Éditeur :Éditions de la Sorbonne
  • Collection : Histoire ancienne et médiévale | 23
  • Lieu d’édition : Paris
  • Année d’édition : 1990
  • Publication sur OpenEdition Books : 29 juillet 2019
  • EAN (Édition imprimée) : 9782859441944
  • EAN électronique : 9791035102401
  • DOI : 10.4000/books.psorbonne.25376
  • Nombre de pages : [VIII]-193 p.

Attic Inscriptions Online YouTube Channel

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L'Oïkos en fête: Célébrations familiales et sociabilité en Grèce ancienne

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L'Oïkos en fête: Célébrations familiales et sociabilité en Grèce ancienne
L'Oïkos en fête
Comment définir la famille en Grèce ancienne ? Qui invite- t-on chez soi ? Suivant quelles modalités ? Pourquoi ? Longtemps, les historiens ont exclu la famille du champ d'étude de la sociabilité, considérant qu'elle relevait de la sphère privée. L'analyse de célébrations ritualisées et normées, le plus souvent festives (mariage, naissance, décès ; sacrifices, banquets, processions, danses, chants), entre parents, amis et voisins, autrement dit entre familiers (oikeioi), ainsi que des disc...

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Note de l’éditeur

Ouvrage publié avec le concours du Conseil scientifique de l'université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne et de l'unité ANHIMA (UMR 8210 Anthropologie et histoire des mondes antiques).
  • Éditeur :Éditions de la Sorbonne
  • Collection : Histoire ancienne et médiévale | 111
  • Lieu d’édition : Paris
  • Année d’édition : 2012
  • Publication sur OpenEdition Books : 29 juillet 2019
  • EAN (Édition imprimée) : 9782859446901
  • EAN électronique : 9791035101657
  • DOI : 10.4000/books.psorbonne.30007
  • Nombre de pages : 265 p.

Open Access Monograph Series: Oriental Institute Publications (OIP)

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 [First posted in AWOL 12 September 2015, updated 1 August 2019]

Oriental Institute Publications (OIP)
ISSN: 0069-3367

For an up to date list of all Oriental Institute publications available online see:

Digital Encyclopaedia of the Hellenic World

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[First posted in AWOL 17 December 2010. Updated 1 July 2019]

Digital Encyclopaedia of the Hellenic World
The Encyclopaedia of the Hellenic World (EHW) is an original electronic project aiming at collecting, recording, documenting, presenting and promoting the historical data that testify to the presence of Hellenic culture throughout time and space. EHW includes entries that concern geographical-cultural areas lying beyond the borders of the Hellenic nation-state.
The EHW aims to offer a complete view of the development, spatial dissemination of the Hellenic cultural phenomenon through time. The issues under examination are not dealt with individually, detached from the framework within which they were created, but in relation to the geographical region in question as well as the non Hellenic cultural traditions. EHW’s ultimate goal is to contribute to the understanding of how Hellenic culture was shaped and disseminated, taking under consideration its contacts and osmoses with other cultural realities and traditions.
EHW’s entries cover the entire spectrum of the Hellenic life and activities and take advantage of the results of current research in relevant scientific fields. EHW draws information as well from archives and archaeological excavations.
The electronic format of the EHW enables it to utilize fully the new digital technologies regarding the design of practical methods of integration, structuring and management of a considerable volume of textual and audiovisual material. The applications developed within the framework of the EHW’s design result from general methodologies regarding the electronic and multimedia presentation of historical and cultural information. In this way, the applications can be useful during the process of other projects that have a similar thematic content....
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Open Access Journal: Bulletin de Correspondance Hellénique (recent issues)

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Bulletin de Correspondance Hellénique [Back issues available at Persée] [Accessible also at CEFAEL]
eISSN: 2241-0104 
Bulletin de correspondance hellénique
Depuis 1877, le Bulletin de correspondance hellénique rend compte de la recherche scientifique sur la Grèce ancienne, de la préhistoire à l’époque byzantine, dans les domaines de l’archéologie, de l’histoire et de l’épigraphie. Publié par l’École française d’Athènes, le Bulletin est semestriel. Les volumes 1877 à 2010 sont disponibles sur Persée.
185 × 240 cm - 446 p.
ISBN 978-2-86958-300-9



See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies

Size Matters – Understanding Monumentality Across Ancient Civilizations

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Size Matters – Understanding Monumentality Across Ancient Civilizations
Size Matters – Understanding Monumentality Across Ancient Civilizations
When talking about monuments, size undeniably matters – or does it?
But how else can we measure monumentality?
Bringing together researchers from various fields such as archaeology, museology, history, sociology, Mesoamerican studies, and art history, this book discusses terminological and methodological approaches in both theoretical contributions and various case studies. While focusing on architectural aspects, this volume also discusses the social meaning of monuments, the role of forced and free labour, as well as textual monumentality. The result is a modern interdisciplinary take on an important concept which is notoriously difficult to define.
2019-07-30, ca. 350 Seiten
ISBN: 978-3-8394-4538-9
Dateigröße: ca. 18.52 MB

Sunoikisis Digital Cultural Heritage programme, Fall 2019

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Sunoikisis Digital Cultural Heritage programme, Fall 2019

Convened by Valeria Vitale & Gabriel Bodard (Institute of Classical Studies)

All common sessions may be followed on the SunoikisisDC YouTube channel: Thursdays 16:00-17:15 UK time *
(* Except Oct 10, time TBA)
  1. Thurs Oct 3: Digital Images and Photography (Rossitza Atanassova, Eugenio Falcioni)
  2. *Thurs Oct 10: 3D Imaging and Photogrammetry (Gabriel Bodard, Emma Payne, Valeria Vitale)
  3. Thurs Oct 17: Decolonization of Cultural Heritage (Usama Gad, Zena Kamash, Patricia Murietta Flores)
  4. Thurs Oct 24: 3D Modelling for Cultural Heritage (Martina Polig, Valeria Vitale)
  5. Thurs Oct 31: Digital Gazetteers (Johan Åhlfeldt, Tom Elliott, Valeria Vitale)
  6. Thurs Nov 7: Linked Open Data (Gabriel Bodard, Paula Granados García, Matteo Romanello)
  7. Thurs Nov 14: Legal and Ethical Considerations (Gabriel Bodard, Richard Nevell, Andrea Wallace)
  8. Thurs Nov 21: GIS and Geovisualization (Chiara Palladino, Rebecca Seifried)
  9. Thurs Nov 28: Crowdsourcing Cultural Heritage (John Pearce, Mia Ridge)

Dongola 2015–2016. Fieldwork, Conservation and Site Management

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Dongola 2015–2016. Fieldwork, Conservation and Site Management
Włodzimierz Godlewski, Dorota Dzierzbicka and Adam Łajtar (eds), 
(=PCMA
Excavation Series 5), Warsaw: PCMA, WUW, 2018
Warsaw 2018
ISBN 978-83-235-3479-2 (print)
ISBN 978-83-235-3497-7 (online)
doi.org/10.31338/uw.9788323534877
280 pages
Soft cover with flaps

More on the book and other PCMA publications:
https://pcma.uw.edu.pl/en/2018/09/05/31009/
The royal city of Old Dongola was the political and economic center of Makuria, a medieval Christian kingdom. It flourished from the 5th/6th century, when the royal complex on the Citadel was built and enclosed within massive stone fortifications. Over the centuries, other representative buildings were founded, among them the imposing Throne Hall later converted into a mosque that still towers over the site today. Equally impressive are the religious complexes unearthed in Dongola. The Makurian capital’s churches and monastic buildings boast stunning mural paintings and inscriptions that shed light on local religious practice, while their architectural design testifies to the skills of local builders. After the royal court abandoned Dongola in 1364, the city remained an important urban center, as indicated by the extensive residential quarters functioning on and around the Citadel for several centuries. The city, still a vital node in the long-distance trade network, was inhabited by a lively community, which cultivated old traditions and embraced new trends.
The Polish Centre of Mediterranean Archaeology University of Warsaw mission to Old Dongola has been excavating the Makurian capital for over 50 years. This volume is the second comprehensive report on fieldwork and conservation conducted in 2015–2016 by a team led by Włodzimierz Godlewski. The contributions report on the work of recent seasons and present in-depth studies on the site’s urban development, architecture and building techniques. The volume also includes results of the most recent specialized research on material brought to light during these and earlier campaigns. The discussed categories of finds include inscriptions, ostraka, pottery, animal bones, and textiles. The wealth of archaeological finds recovered on the site in the seasons under consideration contributes new data to studies on the history of Dongola, as well as the culture, art, architecture and economy of Makuria.

CONTENTS:

Part I: The Monastery on Kom H

Chapter 1: Włodzimierz Godlewski – The Monastery Church – 15

Chapter 2: Dorota Moryto-Naumiuk – Transfer of wall paintings from the
Monastery Church on Kom H – 31

Chapter 3: Adam Łajtar – The Constantinopolitan Creed in an
inscription from the Monastery Church on Kom Η

in Dongola – 37

Chapter 4: Włodzimierz Godlewski – Building H.NW.B.I and its
successive construction phases – 47

Chapter 5: Barbara Czaja – The “golden textile” from a burial in the
monastery on Kom H in Dongola: conservation and restoration – 67

Chapter 6: Adam Łajtar and Vincent W.J. van Gerven Oei – Women in the
Southwest Annex – 75

Chapter 7: Dorota Dzierzbicka and Agata Deptuła – Courtyard A at the
Monastery on Kom H in Dongola: Fieldwork in 2014–2016 – 79

Chapter 8: Katarzyna Danys – Introductory remarks on pottery finds
from Courtyard A of the Monastery on Kom H in Dongola – 101

Chapter 9: Marta Osypińska Faunal remains from the Monastery on Kom H
in Dongola (seasons 2014–2016) – 107

Part II: The Citadel in the times of the Kingdom of Makuria

Chapter 10: Włodzimierz Godlewski – The Church of Archangel Raphael
(SWN.B.V) – 115

Chapter 11: Urszula Kusz – Conservation in the Church of Archangel
Raphael (SWN.B.V) in seasons 2015–2017 – 133

Chapter 12: Romuald Tarczewski Construction of a shelter over the
Church of Archangel Raphael (SWN.B.V) – 139

Chapter 13: Włodzimierz Godlewski, Urszula Kusz, and Adam Łajtar – A
fragmentary wooden icon from the Church of Archangel Raphael (SWN.B.V)
– 147

Chapter 14: Włodzimierz Godlewski with appendix by Adam Łajtar – The
Pillar Church – 155

Part III The city of Dongola in the Funj period

Chapter 15: Włodzimierz Godlewski – Buildings of the Funj period on
the Citadel – 173

Chapter 16: Katarzyna Danys and Maciej Wyżgoł – Smoking pipes from Old
Dongola – 189

Chapter 17: Katarzyna Danys – Glazed pottery of the 9th–16th centuries
from Old Dongola –  203

Chapter 18: Barbara Idzikowska – A reckoning counter from Nuremberg
found in Dongola –  227

Chapter 19: Włodzimierz Godlewski with appendices by Bogdan F. Zerek
and Anna Nowicka – Amulet for the wife of 'Abd Allāh b. Maryam – 231

Chapter 20: Naïm Vanthieghem – Textes arabes trouvés à Dongola en
2013–2016 – 237

Part IV: The Mosque Building

Chapter 21: Romuald Tarczewski – Construction work in the Mosque
Building (Throne Hall) in seasons 2015–2017 – 243

Open Access Journal: Annuaire de l'École pratique des hautes études, section des sciences historiques et philologiques

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 [First posted in AWOL 9 July 2009. Updated 3 August 2019]

Annuaire de l'École pratique des hautes études, section des sciences historiques et philologiques
ISSN: 1969-6310
http://ashp.revues.org/images/logo-ephe.png
L'Annuaire de l'École pratique des hautes études, section des sciences religieuses, est une publication annuelle qui regroupe principalement les comptes rendus des conférences des enseignants-chercheurs de la s
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Derniers numéros

Numéros en texte intégral

The Lettuce Connection:A re-examination of the association of the Egyptian god Min with the lettuce plant from the Predynastic to the Ptolemaic Period.

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The Lettuce Connection:A re-examination of the association of the Egyptian god Min with the lettuce plant from the Predynastic to the Ptolemaic Period.
Pauline Norris

    Abstract

    Min was one of the earliest known Egyptian deities and his origins remain obscure but, because of his association with fertility and the kingship, he retained his importance from the Predynastic Period into the Roman era. Although his depiction as an ithyphallic, mummified male with a flail balanced above his raised right arm remained unaltered throughout, the overall iconography of Min did exhibit changes, notably with the introduction in the Sixth Dynasty of what is accepted as a lettuce plant resembling the modern Cos or Romaine cultivar of Lactuca sativa L. It is the association of Min with the lettuce plant that is the subject of this thesis. It is the received opinion in the literature that the plant was offered to Min, a fertility god, as an aphrodisiac. Apart from two seminal works that are over fifty years old, little research has been conducted into the association of Min with the lettuce. Much early research is in need of re-examination because of changes in social attitudes and research techniques and this the thesis seeks to redress. The aims of the research are to review the evidence for the lettuce plant in ancient Egypt and to re-examine the previously noted association of the god Min with a plant identified as lettuce.The study is primarily library and museum based and examines the history and nature of lettuce in ancient Egypt. The nature of 'aphrodisiac' is examined and the use of such substances in ancient Egypt is compared with modern usage. Min as a god of fertility is re-analysed and, finally, texts and Ptolemaic temple inscriptions are examined for evidence as to why and by whom lettuce was offered. The research results are applied to a study of Min as a god of fertility.The evidence indicates that lettuce was offered by the king to Min to ensure the fertility and regeneration of agriculture and of the king which would secure the continuation of his line and humanity. There is no evidence to suggest lettuce was offered as an aphrodisiac to increase the sexual desire of the god.

    Details

    Original language English
    Awarding Institution
    Supervisors/Advisors
    Award date 31 Dec 2015

    A village, its people, and their texts: Euhemeria and the beginning of Roman rule in Egypt

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    A village, its people, and their texts: Euhemeria and the beginning of Roman rule in Egypt
    William Mundy
    UoM administered thesis: PhD

    Abstract

    The village Euhemeria, located in the Fayum region of Egypt, preserved a corpus of documents on papyri and ostraca from the first century of Roman rule. This thesis studies those documents as a group for the first time, and uses them to examine the question of how this small, rural settlement responded to the arrival of the Roman Empire. The question of how the Euhemerian documents made their way from Egypt to collections around the world is addressed, and the interrelations between the texts are explored. New groups of texts within the evidence, based around individuals and families, are identified and used to underpin an analysis of various aspects of life in Euhemeria. The documents are a particularly rich source of information about agriculture, the local economy, and social relations between the villagers. They also show the emergence of a prosperous new socio-economic group within the village, who seized the opportunities offered by the change of regime from Ptolemaic kingdom to Roman province. Overall, the thesis concludes that, while the village itself was typical of its time and place, the collection of documents that it left to posteriority is unique. A detailed examination of that evidence therefore provides a valuable complementary perspective to previous studies on early Roman Egypt.

    Details

    Original language English
    Awarding Institution
    Supervisors/Advisors
    Award date 1 Aug 2018

    BHLms: Index analytiquedes Catalogues de manuscrits hagiographiques latinspubliés par les Bollandistes

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    BHLms:  Index analytiquedes Catalogues de manuscrits hagiographiques latinspubliés par les Bollandistes
    UCL-Bibliotheca Hagiographica Latina Manuscripta
    La réorganisation des Bollandistes menée, à partir de 1876, sous l'impulsion du P. Ch. De Smedt, accordait une place déterminante à l'exploration méthodique des bibliothèques et à l'inventaire de leurs manuscrits hagiographiques. À une époque où les catalogues imprimés de manuscrits étaient encore rares, pas moins d'une soixantaine de bibliothèques de Belgique, des Pays-Bas, de France, d'Allemagne, d'Italie, d'Écosse et d'Irlande virent leurs fonds inventoriés de façon systématique, débouchant sur la publication de catalogues dans les Analecta Bollandiana et les Subsidia hagiographica (1).
    Cette gigantesque entreprise devait faciliter considérablement le travail des éditeurs de textes -- au premier rang desquels figuraient les Bollandistes eux-mêmes -- en leur faisant connaître aisément des témoins qu'ils n'auraient trouvés qu'à grand'peine et au terme de longues recherches. En même temps, des textes inédits venaient à la lumière, qui, s'ils n'étaient édités immédiatement en appendice du catalogue, se voyaient du moins identifiés, afin de figurer dans le grand répertoire des textes hagiographiques latins qui allait voir le jour au tournant du siècle, la Bibliotheca hagiographica latina.
    Si la BHL, mise à jour en 1911, puis à nouveau en 1986, est d'un usage relativement commode, il n'en va pas de même de l'ensemble constitué par les catalogues de manuscrits hagiographiques, du moins pour le chercheur désireux d'établir une liste de tous les témoins connus d'un texte déterminé: le nombre élevé des catalogues, leur dispersion dans des dizaines de volumes d'AB et de Subsidia, rendent ce travail long et peu commode.
    C'est le mérite de Guy Philippart d'avoir lancé, il y a quelques années, le projet de saisie de tous les catalogues bollandiens sur support électronique. Dans le cadre du Centre de recherche «Hagiographies» qu'il anime au sein du département d'histoire des Facultés universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix à Namur, Michel Trigalet et François De Vriendt, assistés de Paul Bertrand et de Bénédicte Legrain, créèrent la base de données «Légendiers», où les données des catalogues se combinent avec les rubriques correspondantes de la BHL. Celles-ci se voient en outre enrichies d'une série d'éléments de type sociologique et géographique, fournissant ainsi les matériaux d'une grande enquête statistique sur l'histoire de la sainteté et des textes qui s'y réfèrent (2) . De son côté, la Société des Bollandistes avait procédé à la saisie des incipit et desinit -- travail mené à bien par Jean-Marie Delanghe.
    L'une des finalités de l'entreprise était d'aboutir à un index hagiographique cumulatif de tous les catalogues de manuscrits publiés par les Bollandistes, à l'exception des «Inventaires hagiographiques des catalogues latins» régulièrement publiés dans les AB. De commun accord, il avait été décidé que la Société des Bollandistes se chargerait de la révision de l'ensemble et de sa publication. Le travail achevé, il fallut toutefois se rendre à l'évidence: une édition tradi tionnelle sous forme de livre imprimé eût rempli pas moins de 3000 pages: un volume énorme, peu maniable, dont le coût eût été prohibitif. De surcroît, une telle formule eût privé l'usager des multiples ressources offertes par une recherche informatisée, en même temps qu'elle eût figé l'ensemble au seul corpus des catalogues bollandiens.
    La solution qui s'imposait naturellement était celle d'une édition sur support électronique. Élaborée par Robert Godding et Xavier Lequeux, une nouvelle base de données a été constituée, combinant des éléments de la base «Légendiers» avec ceux saisis par les Bollandistes, et adaptant le tout à une consultation en ligne. Baptisé Bibliotheca hagiographica latina manuscripta (BHLms), ce nouveau service (3) est accessible gratuitement sur Internet (4).
    Bien entendu, le projet n'est pas clos. Limitée, à l'heure de son lancement, aux catalogues publiés par les Bollandistes, la BHLms entend bien, avec le temps, s'enrichir de l'apport d'autres catalogues de manuscrits latins imprimés, ainsi que des inventaires inédits dressés par les Bollandistes. Un projet parallèle est en cours d'élaboration pour l'hagiographie grecque.

    Les manuscrits hagiographiques grecs des Bollandistes

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    Les manuscrits hagiographiques grecs des Bollandistes 
     Le but de ce projet appuyé par le Labex RESMED est de mettre en ligne le fichier des manuscrits hagiographiques grecs des Bollandistes (Bibliotheca hagiographica graeca manuscripta), un outil de recherche indispensable dans le domaine de l’histoire religieuse à Byzance, mais qui présente plus largement des ramifications dans toute la chrétienté autour du bassin méditerranéen.

    La prestigieuse Société des Bollandistes, sise à Bruxelles, a pour mission depuis quatre siècles la recherche fondamentale et la création d’instruments de travail dans le domaine de l’hagiographie. Sont élaborées en particulier des claves qui servent à l’identification des textes hagiographiques dans toute les langues (BHG pour le grec, BHL pour le latin, BHO pour les langues orientales). En lien avec cette entreprise, tous les catalogues de manuscrits grecs et les publications relatives à l’hagiographie sont indexées dans un fichier papier qui recense la tradition manuscrite de plusieurs milliers de textes hagiographiques, classés suivant la nomenclature de la BHG. Cet important fichier est le fruit de plus d’un siècle de dépouillement et compte quelque 8750 fiches cartonnées manuscrites. Le fichier qui est une référence pour tous les spécialistes d’hagiographie n’est actuellement consultable que sur place ou par demande écrite auprès de la Société des Bollandistes.

    Open Access Journal: Monumentet

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    Monumentet
    ISSN: 0253-1607

    See AWOL's full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies

    Le paléolithique de la Grèce continentale: État de la question et perspectives de recherche

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    Le paléolithique de la Grèce continentale: État de la question et perspectives de recherche
    Le paléolithique de la Grèce continentale
    Bien que les plus anciennes informations sur la découverte d'outils lithiques en Grèce remontent à la fin du xixe s., il a fallu attendre l’époque de la Seconde Guerre mondiale pour qu’une première fouille soit effectuée sur un site paléolithique. Par la suite, prospections et fouilles se succéderont et s’étaleront sur toute la période d’après-guerre, notamment au cours de la décennie 1960-70, partagées entre plusieurs écoles archéologiques : les Anglais travailleront en Épire. Les América...

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    Note de l’éditeur

    Publié avec le concours du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique.
    • Éditeur :Éditions de la Sorbonne
    • Collection : Histoire ancienne et médiévale | 16
    • Lieu d’édition : Paris
    • Année d’édition : 1986
    • Publication sur OpenEdition Books : 29 juillet 2019
    • EAN (Édition imprimée) : 9782859441265
    • EAN électronique : 9791035102463
    • DOI : 10.4000/books.psorbonne.29698
    • Nombre de pages : 267 p.
    René Treuil
    Préface
    Georgia Kourtessi-Philippakis
    Avant-propos

    NUMISHARE News: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston joins numismatic linked data cloud

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    Museum of Fine Arts, Boston joins numismatic linked data cloud
    The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston is the newest entrant into the Nomisma.org Linked Open Data cloud, providing data for more than 1,600 Roman Republican and Imperial coins to Coinage of the Roman Republic Online and Online Coins of the Roman Empire. The MFA's collection is particularly strong with respect to late Roman gold pieces, many of which represent the sole specimen available for that typology in OCRE.

    Solidus of Constantius II (MFA 65.270), RIC VIII Rome 291.
    Of these coins, roughly 1,400 are Imperial and a little over 200 are from the Republican period. The MFA's terms of service are linked from the datasets page in Nomisma.org itself and the contributors pages in OCRE and CRRO.

    Data for these coins were provided by Laure Marest, Cornelius and Emily Vermeule Assistant Curator of Greek and Roman Art, and processed through OpenRefine to reconcile against the APIs available in both projects. The resulting CSV was transformed into RDF by a script I wrote and uploaded here and ingested into Nomisma's SPARQL endpoint.
     

    ToposText.org News

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    From Brady Kiesling
    I'm very happy to report that PAVLA S.A. has pushed out #ToposTextupdates, for iOS (iPhone), Android, and the website. Please spread the word to your students or teachers, tour guides, and zealous travelers across the Mediterranean
     
    No significant changes in the mobile app this time, just more (760) and cleaner ancient texts, more ancient places and museums (7539), improved Greek and Latin links, and Greek place descriptions enriched with more resources (EFA/BSA Chronique), and with bibliography for a number of underserved minor places borrowed from the Inventory of Archaic and Classical Poleis. Please find good wifi and download! If you've been following my bicycle rides, you'll know the ground-truthing is quixotically thorough for the Athens area, though more help is required to map every named antiquity in Spain or Ultima Thule...
    The ToposText.org website has been substantially reengineered to be faster and cleaner. We've switched to OpenStreetMaps, and map navigation is much faster and clearer. We've added a new map layer capability, so far only to show Athens antiquities overlaid on Anavasi's nifty map.
     
    Now, when cruising the place and person indexes, you instantly pull up the paragraph in question, and then decide whether you want to load the whole text (faster, but still slow for the longest texts). 
    The proximity search feature continues to churn out serendipitous, frequently ominous, answers to almost any juxtaposition of words or concepts (try \bTrump\b with world).
     
    And with the new API-based internal architecture, it's possible to query the site and extract for your own website or hypertext document, say as a pop-up text box, any paragraph from our ancient library. (Formatted as JSON and xml, which you will then want to parse somehow to make it pretty).
     
    Generate a URL of the form https://topostext.org/api/paragraph/readParagraph.php… and you'll get Herodotus 5.6. (It helps to have the Canonical Text Service (TLG/PHI/Stoa) numbers to be sure what paragraph you're asking for).
     
    But you can also find it by searching for a string of text you know the passage contains (with + filling spaces between words), such as https://topostext.org/api/paragraph/readParagraph.php…
    and you'll get a passage from Plato's Phaedrus. Search for Athens and you'll get the first literary mention, Homer's Iliad 2.546ff).
    Thanks as always to the Aikaterini Laskaridis Foundation for its support, and to the smart people at PAVLA who keep improving reality to match the dream.