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Archaeology in Greece Online / Chronique des fouilles en ligne

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[First posted in AWOL 30 November 2009. Updated 17 February 2019]

Archaeology in Greece Online / Chronique des fouilles en ligne
Chronique des fouilles en ligne - AGO

Editorial project

Archaeology in Greece Online combines the Chronique published annually in the BCH by the French School at Athens, and Archaeology in Greece published as part of the annual Archaeological Reports by the Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies and the British School at Athens (which continues to appear in print in a new review format).
The project is managed jointly by the French School at Athens and the British School at Athens: data processing is divided by region and reflects the traditions, history and research foci of the two schools. Texts are thus either in English or in French, but the search engine draws on the entire database regardless of language.
 

Collaborators

The Chronique team of the French School at Athens consists of Alexandre Farnoux (School Director), Amélie Perrier (Director of Studies in Antiquity and Byzantine Studies), and Catherine Bouras (editorial secretary). Entries on Cyprus are written by Sabine Fourrier (CNRS). The drafting of entries is regularly entrusted to scientific members of the School. For the British School at Athens, the team consists of John Bennet (School Director), Chryssanthi Papadopoulou (Assistant Director), and Kostis Christakis (Knossos Curator).
 

General Information

The inclusion of material in Archaeology in Greece Online does not constitute its formal publication.
The EfA and the BSA cannot supply copies of illustrations here reproduced to which they do not hold copyright.
 

Website

This website has been entirely redevelop during the year 2018 in the EfA by L. Mulot (Software engineer) and G. Bejjaji (trainee in the IT department).
The geographic database is synchronized with the ATLAS platform, supported and maintained in the BSA by Chavdar Tzochev and Jean-Sébastien Gros.

The site has been tested with different browsers (for computers, phones and tablettes) in their most recent versions, supporting actual HTML standards. It is strongly recommended that you update your browser to avoid problems with display, animation, content management, and security.
Refer to the official site of your web browser for more information.

Open Access Journal: Roman Legal Tradition: A Journal of Ancient Medieval and Modern Civil Law

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[First posted in AWOL 14 May 2914, updated 17 February 2019]

Roman Legal Tradition: A Journal of Ancient Medieval and Modern Civil Law
ISSN 1943-6483
http://www.romanlegaltradition.org/img/banner.gif
A Journal of Ancient Medieval and Modern Civil Law
Roman Legal Tradition is a peer-reviewed journal published online by the Ames Foundation and the University of Glasgow School of Law. ISSN 1943-6483.
The journal aims to promote the study of the civilian tradition in English. The editors welcome contributions on any aspect of the civilian tradition in ancient, medieval, and modern law.
All articles and reviews published in Roman Legal Tradition are available from this site free of charge. In addition, all articles and reviews are also available to subscribers of HeinOnline. We encourage readers to use and distribute these materials as they see fit, but ask readers not to make any commercial use of these materials without seeking the consent of the editors and relevant authors.
Contents. The contents for all issues are here. The articles are in PDF format. They may be saved and printed without restriction.
Index of Sources. A full index of primary sources cited in the first five volumes are here.
Guidelines for Contributors. These guidelines are provided mainly for the benefit of those who are providing final copy to the editors.
Contact Information and Subscriptions. This page contains details for editorial communication with the editors, subscriptions, and purchase of back issues.
The first three volumes were published by the Roman Law Society of America, with the support of the University of Kansas Law School, and appeared both online and in print under ISSN 1551-1375. Back issues of Volumes Two and Three are available from Amazon.com from the link to the left. 

2018 —

The Riccobono Seminar of Roman Law in America: The Lost Years
Timothy Kearley

The Riccobono Seminar of Roman Law in America was the preeminent source of intellectual support for Romanists in the United States during the middle of the twentieth century (1930-1956). It was named in honor of the great Italian Romanist Salvatore Riccobono, who was a visiting professor at the Catholic University of America (CUA) in 1929. His lectures at the CUA inspired American Romanists to create an organization that would foster the study and teaching of Roman law in the United States following his departure. In the course of the Seminar's existence, many of the era's greatest Roman law scholars, both foreign and domestic, gave presentations at the Riccobono Seminar. The history of the Seminar after it came under the aegis of the CUA in 1935 has been readily available, but that is not the case for the years 1930-1935, when it moved among several law schools in the District of Columbia. This paper uses archival information and newspaper sources to describe the Seminar's activities in those "lost years."
[14:1–13 | Blog on article
Alan Watson 1933–2018O. F. Robinson

Professor Robinson writes on the death of Alan Watson, Distin­guished Research Professor and holder of the Ernest P. Rogers Chair at the University of Georgia School of Law.
[14:14–17 | Blog on article
2017 —The Vices and Virtues of Friendship. Juridical Metaphors in Horace
(Ep. 2.2 and Sat. 1.3)

Consuelo Carrasco García

Two poems by Quintus Horatius Flaccus (65-8 BC) provide us with the occasion to study how Roman society of the first century BC perceived the law. They allow us to see the creative process of the poet from a literary point of view and at the same time to become aware of his moral and philosophical values. This is a work of Roman law, but also of literature and of the language in which both are expressed. The legal analysis of the poems helps us to understand the way in which the author avails himself of legal situations and morphosyntactic phenomena that are characteristic of the language of law in order to achieve poetic effects, which would be impossible if he did not thoroughly understand the mechanisms of the ius that he refers to. One could say the same with respect to the public with whose complicity he reckons: a public - at least the elite that Horace addresses himself to especially - that knows how to "read between the lines," since it is able to appreciate and understand, among the metaphors and other literary devices, the subtlety of the Roman jurists' thinking; all this because the legal world is nothing strange to it. Dating to around 19 and 36 BC respectively, both poems have as their underlying argument the taking shape of the concept of "vice," of the body and of the mind, and its antonym "virtue," the latter understood as careful consideration in judging the "defects or shortcomings" of others, especially one's friends.
[13:10–47 | Blog on article
ReviewGergely Deli

Corpus und Universitas. Römisches Körperschafts- und Gesellschaftsrecht: zwischen griechischer Philosophie und römischer Politik. By Andreas Groten. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck. 2015. xv + 477 pp. ISBN 978-3-16-153316-7.
[13:5–9
ReviewErnest Metzger

Cicero's Law: Rethinking Roman Law of the Late Republic. Edited by Paul J. du Plessis. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. 2016. x + 241 pp. ISBN 978-1-4744-0882-0.
[13:1–4 | Blog on article
2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2004 | 2002

Fasti Congressum

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[First posted in AWOL 4 June 2015, updated 18 February 2019]

Fasti Congressum
Romans used to call fasti to chronologically organized records. Originally, fasti were the days in which public events were allowed: coming from fas, that which is legitimate in Gods’ eyes. So, Romans exposed calendars in their cities with necessary instructions for daily life. Eventually, documents recording magistrates and most important events each year were also called fasti. These traditions are combined to name this proyect, Fasti Congressuum.

Every week, somewhere in the world, a congress, seminar, encounter, conference or workshop is hold, with a subject directly related with Classics. The interest generated by this period within the academic world leads to an exchange of ideas which is hard to track. Fasti Congressuum is born with the aim of becoming a useful tool for professionals, researchers, students and amateurs by compiling the greatest number of events as possible in a single calendar with two kinds of information: Call for Papers and Congress programs. Topics are framed in the many aspects of Classics: Rome, Greece, Egypt, East, History, Proto-History, Archaeology, Epigraphy, Numismatics, Art, Philology, Literature, Philosophy, Reception, Topography, Law...

Accepting the challenge of helping to transmit information about encounters and debates on Antiquity, we welcome and encourage you to collaborate with us.
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Recent Egyptological Dissertations from. the University of Cambridge

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Recent Egyptological Dissertations from the University of Cambridge

Lourenço Gonçalves, P. M. (2019). Landscape and environmental changes at Memphis during the dynastic period in Egypt (Doctoral thesis). https://doi.org/10.17863/CAM.35048
Abstract
Memphis is considered to have been the main metropolis of dynastic Egypt. For more than 3000 years the settlement played a primary role in political, economic and cultural life of the state, functioning as capital for long periods. Nonetheless, little is known about the setting and archaeology of the city itself, even when compared to other Egyptian settlements. This work investigates the context and archaeology of Memphis, recognising distinctive development phases, and examines potential reasons for historical changes. Sedimentary records of 77 boreholes taken in the area of Mit Rahina are analysed to detect palaeoenvironmental conditions and palaeo-landscape features. Their interpretation is sustained by a multidisciplinary approach drawing together prior archaeological, historical and geomorphological studies. A model reflecting the transformations of Memphis is formulated and multi-scale landscape and environmental changes in the Memphite region over the last 5000 years are established. According to this new model, a settlement was founded during the Early Dynastic Period on a complex of sandbanks which were separated and surrounded by three branches of the Nile. After its foundation and during the Early Dynastic Period and the Old Kingdom, the city grew on the western cluster of sandbanks while the West Channel was losing flow. During the First Intermediate Period and the beginning of the Middle Kingdom extreme floods significantly affected the settlement. It recovered during the Middle Kingdom when large-scale landscape management initiatives and strong interventions on the margins of the Central Channel were undertaken. By the New Kingdom, the Middle Birka was already dry land, mainly as a result of human intervention. The East Channel became the only active branch of the Nile serving the city and the Eastern Koms were intensively settled. In the Late Period the city had expanded to the Northern Koms and the North Birka silted up. During the Ptolemaic Period, the city reached its maximum extension, despite important changes in its status and social-economic background. Subsequently, the importance of the city declined with the end of the dynastic state, while the East Channel started to migrate slowly eastward. The city decayed and was abandoned after a few centuries. Some landscape and environmental changes are positively associated both with urban mutation and with different social, economic and political phases of Memphis’ history. Human interventions actively induced the evolution of both landscape and local environment. Events at the supra-regional level, both natural and especially anthropic, also had impact and are linked to changes at Memphis. Conversely, contingencies restricted to the Memphite region influenced the development of the state. Local situations at Memphis—e.g., crisis, disaster, conflict, prosperity, or affluence—could be magnified to the extent that they have been perceived as having affected the state as a whole. The foundation and development of Memphis were tightly interconnected with the fortunes of state and power. The city embodied the cultural and political identity of the state and maintained its prominence through dynastic Egyptian history. Triangular complex cause–effect relations between local changes in Memphis, historical change in Egypt, and climatic and environmental evolution both at regional and supra-regional scales are recognised. The significance of each varied with time, determining the evolution of Memphis and also of dynastic Egypt.
Janulíková, B. (2018). Non-elite mortuary variability in the Early Dynastic Memphis region (Doctoral thesis). https://doi.org/10.17863/CAM.26020
Abstract
No settlement remains at Early Dynastic Memphis, the first ‘capital’ of the newly emerging Egyptian state, have yet been located. This study draws together exclusive evidence from three well-known non-elite Memphite cemeteries Saqqara-Serapeum, Turah and the recently excavated site of Helwan (all dating from 3200 to 2700 BC) to explore the society of this early urban centre through its funerary remains. The study engages in statistical analyses of cemetery data comparing grave parameters such as volume, quantity of grave goods, their materials and pottery vessel types, but also architecture, body protection, skeletal sex and the age of the deceased across sites. The application of statistical hypothesis testing techniques forms a methodological cornerstone highlighting some pitfalls of mortuary analyses rooted in Processual theoretical frameworks. As a result, a nuanced funerary culture with a significant degree of mortuary variability was revealed at each of the sites investigated. Non-elite funerary provision at Memphis was influenced by a complex web of factors such as economic potential, relationships to local elites, communal and personal identities, choice, and practicality. While mortuary differentiation by sex could not be proven statistically, evidence emerged for significant age differentiation in the funerary provision. The four communities investigated are distinct and each represent a different population within the Memphite region ranging from a main necropolis (Helwan) to a cemetery of a secondary or tertiary local centre (Turah). The smallscale regionality observed at Memphis should serve as a springboard for future research on Early Dynastic Egypt. Finally, the study has highlighted the research potential of statistical analyses to extract vital information from old data, alongside the importance of hypothesis testing in the evaluation of such analyses.
Strong, M. (2018). Illuminating the path of darkness: social and sacred power of artificial light in Pharaonic Period Egypt (Doctoral thesis). https://doi.org/10.17863/CAM.24194
Abstract
Light is seldom addressed in archaeological research, despite the fact that, at least in ancient Egypt, it would have impacted upon all aspects of life. When discussing light in Egyptology, the vast majority of scholarly attention is placed on the sun, the primary source of illumination. In comparison, artificial light receives very little attention, primarily due to a lack of archaeological evidence for lighting equipment prior to the 7th century BC. However, 19th and 20th century lychnological studies have exaggerated this point by placing an overwhelming emphasis on decorated lamps from the Greco-Roman Period. In an attempt to move beyond these antiquarian roots, recent scholarship has turned towards examining the role that light, both natural and artificial, played in aspects of ancient societies’ architecture, ideology and religion. The extensive body of archaeological, textual and iconographic evidence that remains from ancient Egypt is well suited to this type of study and forms three core data sets in this thesis. Combining a materials-based examination of artificial light with a contextualized, theoretical analysis contributes to a richer understanding of ancient Egyptian culture from the 3rd to 1st millennium BC. The first three chapters of this study establish a typology of known artificial lighting equipment, as well as a lexicon of lighting terminology. A comparison of the archaeological and textual evidence allows for a discussion on the consumption of lighting in ancient Egypt and its impact on social and economic spheres. From this material it becomes apparent that artificial light was a luxury and this corresponds to its inclusion in religious texts and iconography, as well as the presence of lighting implements in tombs of the wealthy elite. The second half of the thesis examines the ritual application of artificial light, incorporating iconographic and textual evidence, consideration of ritual space and timing, and experimental archaeology. This interdisciplinary approach allows for a discussion of the sensory experience of artificial lighting and its perceived potency in ancient Egypt. It also demonstrates the contribution that Egyptology can make to lychnological and sensory studies of the ancient Near East and Mediterranean by examining the impact of light on phenomenology and aesthetics.
Hinson, B. S. P. (2018). Coming of Age or an Age of Becoming? The Role of Childhood in Identity Formation at Deir el-Medina, New Kingdom Egypt (Doctoral thesis). https://doi.org/10.17863/CAM.22076
Abstract
This thesis explores the role of childhood in identity formation. The concept that childhood contributes to an individual’s identity—how a person becomes who they are, and how childhood influences this—is universally relevant. However, whilst the influence of childhood is universal, exactly what ‘childhood’ means is not. Because the existence of children is a common thread linking all societies, it is unsurprising that every society has a different conception of what ‘childhood’ means, which members were considered children, and the freedoms, restrictions or expectations placed on those at this stage of life. The discussion here is framed within the context of ancient Egypt—specifically, the site of Deir el-Medina—but its approach is also relevant to those studying childhood in other areas. Today, identity is considered equivalent to how we define and understand ourselves, influenced by our personal experiences. However, these experiences are themselves informed by how society defines and groups us, based on factors such as gender, ethnicity or religion. Identity therefore involves two inter-linked components: how society defines the individual, and how individuals define themselves. In exploring the role of childhood in identity formation, the aim of this thesis is to consider both components as they relate to children. The first reflects how society at Deir el-Medina constructed and conceptualised ‘childhood’, informing how children were treated, their scope for social participation, and the relationships they engaged in. The second reflects how children as individuals lived within these social structures, and how such personal experiences contributed to a sense of self. Only by considering both elements can a holistic picture be formed.
 Ownby, M. (2010). Canaanite jars from Memphis as evidence for trade and political relationships in the Middle Bronze Age (Doctoral thesis). https://doi.org/10.17863/CAM.15961
Abstract
Trade between two regions often necessitates that the respective parties are political entities. This was indeed the case for trade between Egypt and the Levant during the Middle Bronze Age (ca. 2000-1550 BC, MBA) and Late Bronze Age (ca. 1550-1200 BC, LBA). Scientific analyses of Canaanite jars, transport vessels, from the site of Memphis, Egypt provided an ideal proxy for examining the relationship between trade and politics. During the MBA, Levantine peoples were present at the site of Tell el-Dabca in the eastern Nile Delta. However, archaeologically there is little evidence for contact between these peoples and the Egyptians at Memphis. Results of comparison of MBA Canaanite jars from both sites suggest the political situation fostered trade with the Levant and limited interaction with the Egyptians. During the LBA, Egyptian kings controlled territory in the Levant. A comparison of MBA and LBA Canaanite jars from Memphis revealed that the political changes in some cases affected the trade partners but not in others. Further, the production of the jars appeared to have altered in some regions. These results suggest that the affect of political situations on trade can vary, from only minor changes, to the complete exclusion of trade partners and the introduction of new trade contacts. However, the influence of lucrative trade networks on political developments was also illustrated. The utility of provenance studies of ceramics for understanding the complex relationship between trade and politics was confirmed.
 
 

Project Announcement: Linking Islands of Data

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Linking Islands of Data
https://data-islands.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk/images/layouts/salamis.jpg
“Linking Islands of Data” will create a research network based around centres of excellence that study the Classical World. This network will focus on classics, archaeology, epigraphy and museology and create a variety of digital and analogue outputs - including an application programming interface (API), documentation and guidance for best practice in the use of Linked Open Data and high resolution document handling - using established and emergent technological methods and communities of practice based around 3 workshops held at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Brown University and Open Context.
The outputs of this networked activity will build upon the extremely strong collective outputs that were generated at the National Endowment for the Humanities funded Linked Ancient World Data Institute held at New York and Drew Universities in 2012 and 2013. The PI and Co-I were both members of faculty for the Institute and this project will draw on the experience of our American partners (Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, Brown, Iowa, Open Context, New York University, American Numismatic Society, the Getty) to inform and develop this network to be inclusive, open and ultimately of academic and public value. This network will address the paucity of exemplars, guidance and documentation that exists within the museum and digital humanities sector about integrating multiple digital approaches into a coherent and sustainable exhibition framework. Worldwide, there are beacons of brilliance in individual areas but lack of face to face time and funding makes it hard to coalesce this knowledge into something tangible. This project provides this opportunity and will build on the USA institutional partners’ track records of building digital tools that become infrastructure or software as a service platforms (SaaS).
Our proposed network draws on a wide array of partners and collaborators with specialist experience in all of the key museological areas, including Epigraphy (Brown), Linked Open Data (the Getty, American Numismatics Society, Pelagios, Portable Antiquities Scheme, British Museum, Open Context, Kerameikos), the use and implementation of IIIF (American Numismatics Society, Cambridge University, J. Paul Getty Trust), 3D technologies which include replication, printing, Augmented Reality, and Virtual Reality (Fitzwilliam Museum and University of London) and Crowdsourcing (Fitzwilliam Museum and British Museum). Our network is also based around long term and proven excellence and uses the expertise of its team. For example, PI Pett on the British Museum’s Portable Antiquities Scheme and MicroPasts and 3D technologies, Vitale on Classical Archaeology and the Pelagios project, Co-I Barker on the Pelagios project, University of Virginia and the American Numismatic Society on Keramikos and numismatics projects respectively, Open Context’s extensive specialist knowledge of publishing digital data from archaeology and related fields, ISAW’s Pleiades network which is now seen as digital infrastructure for a wide variety of projects, Kings College London’s Historic Gazetteer of Cyprus, Brown University’s work on epigraphy, the Getty’s work on conceptual modelling, IIIF and metadata as a service, the scholarly network of Cambridge University’s museums and Classical Archaeology department.
This project which is generously funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and can be found under grant number AH/S012478/1.

Open Access Monograph Series: Ancient Narrative Supplementum

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[First posted in AWOL 18 June 2015, updated 28 February 2019]

Ancient Narrative Supplementum
ISSN: 1568-3540
Page Header
Ancient Narrative publishes regular volumes and supplements, which appear both in print and online. AN is published continuously, not in separate issues, but after the end of the year a volume containing all articles of the past year will appear simultaneously in print and on this website.
Fully open access volumes 1-12, partially open access volumes 11 ff.

2018

ANS 25 The Alexander Romance: History and Literature

The Alexander Romance: History and Literature
Ancient Narrative Supplements 22
Richard Stoneman, Krzysztof Nawotka & Agnieszka Wojciechowska (eds.)

ANS 24.2 Re-Wiring the Ancient Novel 2: Roman Novels and Other Important Texts

Re-Wiring the Ancient Novel
Volume 2: Roman Novels and Other Important Texts
Ancient Narrative Supplements 24.2
Edmund Cueva, Gareth Schmeling, Paula James, Karen Ní Mheallaigh, Stelios Panayotakis, Nadia Scippacercola

ANS 24.1 Re-Wiring the Ancient Novel 1: Greek Novels

Re-Wiring the Ancient Novel
Volume 1: Greek Novels
Ancient Narrative Supplements 24.1
Edmund Cueva, Stephen Harrison, Hugh Mason, William Owens, Saundra Schwartz (eds.)

2017

ANS 22 Xenophon’s Ephesiaca

Xenophon’s EphesiacaA Paraliterary Love-Story from the Ancient World
Ancient Narrative Supplements 22
Aldo Tagliabue

2016

ANS 21 From Bedroom to Courtroom

From Bedroom to Courtroom
Law and Justice in the Greek Novel
Ancient Narrative Supplements 21
Saundra Schwartz

2015

ANS 20 Philosophy and the Ancient Novel

Philosophy and the Ancient Novel
Ancient Narrative Supplements 20
Edited by Marí­lia P. Futre Pinheiro and Silvia Montiglio

ANS 19 Holy Men and Charlatans in the Ancient Novel

Holy Men and Charlatans in the Ancient Novel
Ancient Narrative Supplements 19
Edited by Stelios Panayotakis, Gareth Schmeling, and Michael Paschalis

2014

ANS 18 The Ancient Novel and the Frontiers of Genre

The Ancient Noveland the Frontiers of Genre
Ancient Narrative Supplements 18
Edited by Marí­lia P. Futre Pinheiro, Gareth Schmeling, and Edmund P. Cueva

2013

ANS 17 The Construction of the Real and the Ideal…

The Construction of the Real and the Ideal in the Ancient Novel
Ancient Narrative Supplements 17
Edited by Michel Paschalis and Stelios Panayotakis

2012

ANS 16 The Ancient Novel and Early Chr. and Jewish Narrative

The Ancient Novel and Early Christian and Jewish Narrative: Fictional Intersections
Ancient Narrative Supplements 16
Marí­lia P. Futre Pinheiro, Judith Perkins, Richard Pervo (Eds.)

ANS 15 The Alexander Romance in Persia and the East

The Alexander Romance in Persia and the East
Ancient Narrative Supplements 15
Richard Stoneman, Kyle Erickson, Ian Netton (Eds.)

2011

ANS 14.2 Fictional Traces 2

Fictional Traces: Receptions of the Ancient Novel Volume 2
Ancient Narrative Supplements 14.2
Marí­lia P. Futre Pinheiro and Stephen J. Harrison (eds.)

ANS 14.1 Fictional Traces 1

Fictional Traces: Receptions of the Ancient Novel Volume 1
Ancient Narrative Supplements 14.1
Marí­lia P. Futre Pinheiro and Stephen J. Harrison (eds.)

ANS 13 Echoing Narratives

Echoing Narratives: Studies of Intertextuality in Greek and Roman Prose Fiction
Ancient Narrative Supplements 13
Konstantin Doulamis (ed.)


2009

ANS 12 Readers and Writers in the Ancient Novel

Readers and Writers in the Ancient Novel
Ancient Narrative Supplements 12
Michael Paschalis, Stelios Panayotakis, Gareth Schmeling (eds.)FREE

2008

ANS 11 Paideia at Play

Paideia at Play: Learning and Wit in Apuleius
Supplements 11
Werner Riess (ed.)FREE

2007

ANS 10 Philosophical Presences in the Ancient Novel

Philosophical Presences in the Ancient Novel
Ancient Narrative Supplements 10
J.R. Morgan, Meriel Jones (eds.)FREE

ANS 9 Greek Identity and the Athenian Past in Chariton

Greek Identity and the Athenian Past in Chariton:
The Romance of Empire
Ancient Narrative Supplements 9
Steven D. SmithFREE

ANS 8 The Greek and the Roman Novel: Parallel Readings

The Greek and the Roman Novel: Parallel Readings
Ancient Narrative Supplements 8
Michael Paschalis, Stavros Frangoulidis, Stephen Harrison, Maaike Zimmerman (eds.)FREE

ANS 7 Seeing Tongues, Hearing Scripts

Seeing Tongues, Hearing Scripts: Orality and Representation in the Ancient Novel
Ancient Narrative Supplements 7
Victoria Rimell (ed.)FREE

2006

ANS 6 Lectiones Scrupulosae

Lectiones Scrupulosae: Essays on the Text and Interpretation of Apuleius' Metamorphoses in Honour of Maaike Zimmerman
Ancient Narrative Supplements 6
W.H. Keulen, R.R. Nauta, S. Panayotakis (eds.)FREE

ANS 5 Authors, Authority, and Interpreters in the Ancient Novel

Authors, Authority, and Interpreters in the Ancient Novel: Essays in Honor of Gareth L. Schmeling
Ancient Narrative Supplements 5
Shannon N. Byrne, Edmund P. Cueva, Jean Alvares (eds.)

2005

ANS 4 Metaphor and the Ancient Novel

Metaphor and the Ancient Novel
Ancient Narrative Supplements 4
Stephen Harrison, Michael Paschalis, Stavros Frangoulidis (eds.)FREE

ANS 3 The Bakhtin Circle and Ancient Narrative

The Bakhtin Circle and Ancient Narrative
Ancient Narrative Supplements 3
R. Bracht Branham (ed.)

2004

ANS 2 The Recollections of Encolpius

The Recollections of Encolpius: The Satyrica of Petronius as Milesian Fiction
Ancient Narrative Supplements 2
Gottskálk JenssonFREE

2002

ANS 1 Space in the Ancient Novel

Space in the Ancient Novel
Ancient Narrative Supplements 1
Michael Paschalis, Stavros Frangoulidis (eds.)FREE

    Open Access Journals: Palaeohistoria

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    Palaeohistoria
    ISSN: 0552-9344
    Palaeohistoria
    The annual journal Palaeohistoria - full title Acta et Communicationes Instituti Bio-Archaeologici Universitatis Groninganae - is edited by the staff of the Institute, and carries detailed articles on material culture, analysis of radiocarbon data and the results of excavations, surveys and coring campaigns. Palaeohistoria plays an essential role in the exchange network of journals that has been established with 160 other archaeological institutes in the Netherlands and abroad.

     See the full List of Open Access Journals in Ancient Studies

    Newly added in the Open Textbook Library

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    Newly added in the Open Textbook Library
    Read more about Greek and Latin Roots: Part I - Latin

    Greek and Latin Roots: Part I - Latin

    Peter Smith, University of Victoria

    Greek and Latin Roots: Part I - Latin is part one of a two part series. This series examines the systematic principles by which a large portion of English vocabulary has evolved from Latin and (to a lesser degree) from Greek. This book focuses on Latin roots. A link to the second part focusing on the Greek roots can be found below. Part I will try to impart some skill in the recognition and proper use of words derived from Latin. There is a stress on principles: although students will be continually looking at interesting individual words, their constant aim will be to discover predictable general patterns of historical development, so that they may be able to cope with new and unfamiliar words of any type that they have studied. They will be shown how to approach the problem by a procedure known as “word analysis,” which is roughly comparable to the dissection of an interesting specimen in the biology laboratory. The text assumes no previous knowledge of Latin, and does not involve the grammatical study of this language—except for a few basic features of noun and verb formation that will help students to understand the Latin legacy in English. Although there will be some attention paid to the historical interaction of Latin with English, this text is definitely not a systematic history of the English language. It focuses on only those elements within English that have been directly or indirectly affected by this classical language. In order to provide the broadest possible service to students, the text emphasizes standard English vocabulary in current use. The more exotic technical vocabulary of science and medicine can be extremely interesting, but is explored in only summary fashion. Nevertheless, this text should be of considerable value, say, to a would-be botanist or medical doctor, if only by providing the foundation for further specialized enquiry.


    (1 review
    Read more about Greek and Latin Roots: Part II - Greek

    Greek and Latin Roots: Part II - Greek

    Peter Smith, University of Victoria

    Greek and Latin Roots: Part II - Greek is part two of a two part series. This series examines the systematic principles by which a large portion of English vocabulary has evolved from Latin and (to a lesser degree) from Greek. This book focuses on Greek roots. A link to the first part focusing on the Latin roots can be found below. Part II will try to impart some skill in the recognition and proper use of words derived from Greek. There is a stress on principles: although students will be continually looking at interesting individual words, their constant aim will be to discover predictable general patterns of historical development, so that they may be able to cope with new and unfamiliar words of any type that they have studied. They will be shown how to approach the problem by a procedure known as “word analysis,” which is roughly comparable to the dissection of an interesting specimen in the biology laboratory. The text assumes no previous knowledge of Greek, and does not involve the grammatical study of this language—except for a few basic features of noun and verb formation that will help students to understand the Greek legacy in English. All students will be asked to learn the Greek alphabet. This skill is not absolutely essential for a general knowledge of Greek roots in English. However, it will help students understand a number of otherwise puzzling features of spelling and usage. Although there will be some attention paid to the historical interaction of Greek with English, this text is definitely not a systematic history of the English language. It focuses on only those elements within English that have been directly or indirectly affected by this classical language. In order to provide the broadest possible service to students, the text emphasizes standard English vocabulary in current use. The more exotic technical vocabulary of science and medicine can be extremely interesting, but is explored in only summary fashion. Nevertheless, this text should be of considerable value, say, to a would-be botanist or medical doctor, if only by providing the foundation for further specialized enquiry.

    No ratings
    (0 reviews)
    Read more about Intermediate Biblical Greek Reader: Galatians and Related Texts

    Intermediate Biblical Greek Reader: Galatians and Related Texts

    Nijay Gupta, Portland Seminary
    Jonah Sandford

    After completing basic biblical Greek, students are often eager to continue to learn and strengthen their skills of translation and interpretation. This intermediate graded reader is designed to meet those needs. The reader is “intermediate” in the sense that it presumes the user will have already learned the basics of Greek grammar and syntax and has memorized Greek vocabulary words that appear frequently in the New Testament. The reader is “graded” in the sense that it moves from simpler translation work (Galatians) towards more advanced readings from the book of James, the Septuagint, and from one of the Church Fathers. In each reading lesson, the Greek text is given, followed by supplemental notes that offer help with vocabulary, challenging word forms, and syntax. Discussion questions are also included to foster group conversation and engagement. There are many good Greek readers in existence, but this reader differs from most others in a few important ways. Most readers offer text selections from different parts of the Bible, but in this reader the user works through one entire book (Galatians). All subsequent lessons, then, build off of this interaction with Galatians through short readings that are in some way related to Galatians. The Septuagint passages in the reader offer some broader context for texts that Paul quotes explicitly from the Septuagint. The Patristic reading from John Chrysystom comes from one of his homilies on Galatians. This approach to a Greek reader allows for both variety and coherence in the learning process.



    (1 review)

    Read more about The Ideologies of Lived Space in Literary Texts, Ancient and Modern

    The Ideologies of Lived Space in Literary Texts, Ancient and Modern

    Jo Heirman, University of Amsterdam
    Jacqueline Klooster, University of Amsterdam

    In a brief essay called Des espaces autres (1984) Michel Foucault announced that after the nineteenth century, which was dominated by a historical outlook, the current century might rather be the century of space. His prophecy has been fulfilled: the end of the twentieth century witnessed a ‘spatial turn' in humanities which was perhaps partly due to the globalisation of our modern world. Inspired by the spatial turn in the humanities, this volume presents a number of essays on the ideological role of space in literary texts. The individual articles analyse ancient and modern literary texts from the angle of the most recent theoretical conceptualisations of space. The focus throughout is on how the experience of space is determined by dominant political, philosophical or religious ideologies and how, in turn, the description of spaces in literature is employed to express, broadcast or deconstruct this experience. By bringing together ancient and modern, mostly postcolonial texts, this volume hopes to stimulate discussion among disciplines and across continents. Among the authors discussed are: Homer, Nonnus, Alcaeus of Lesbos, Apollonius of Rhodes, Vergil, Herodotus, Panagiotis Soutsos, Assia Djebar, Tahar Djaout, Olive Senior, Jamaica Kincaid, Stefan Heym, Benoit Dutuertre, Henrik Stangerup and David Malouf.



    (1 review)

    Read more about Introduction to Human Osteology

    Introduction to Human Osteology

    Roberta Hall, Oregon State University
    Kenneth Beals, Oregon State University
    Holm Neumann
    Georg Neumann, Indiana University
    Gwyn Madden, Grand Valley State University

    This text was designed for use in the human osteology laboratory classroom. Bones are described to aid in identification of skeletonized remains in either an archaeological or forensic anthropology setting. Basic techniques for siding, aging, sexing, and stature estimation are described. Both images of bone and drawings are included which may be used for study purposes outside of the classroom. The text represents work that has been developed over more than 30 years by its various authors and is meant to present students with the basic analytical tools for the study of human osteology.



    (7 reviews)

    New Open Access Journal: New Classicists

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    New Classicists
    New Classicists 01
    New Classicists is an online periodical aimed at providing a publication platform for postgraduate students in any field that relates to the Classical World.  Our advisory board members aid in sourcing international academics for the two person, blind peer reviewing of each accepted article before publication.
    To begin with, there will be two publications a year, February and September, starting in February 2019.  Thanks to generous funding from the Classics department at King's College London, the journal will now be an open access publication.
    If you are a postgraduate student of any recognised institution, or are within two years of completing a degree, and you would like to have an article peer reviewed and published, please submit a finished draft of up to 5000 words, along with a short abstract.  Articles can be submitted at any time during the year, but the peer reviewing process can take up to three months so bear this in mind if you want your article included in a particular edition.  Please use the Harvard referencing style for modern sources and the Oxford style for ancient sources, with footnotes, if required, at the bottom of each page.  For more information, please see this referencing guide.

    Each article will be assessed for suitability and an outcome will be forwarded to you within two weeks of this date.
    We are also looking for book reviews of recent Classical books.  Please contact the editor for more information if you would like to submit a book review.
    In the meantime, please follow us on our social media sites and spread the word to your fellow postgrad students and friends!


     

    AXON: Silloge di Iscrizione Storiche Greche

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    [First posted in AWOL 27 January 2016, updated (new URLs) 19 February 2019]

    AXON: Silloge di Iscrizione Storiche Greche / Greek Historical Inscriptios
    Axon Project aims to offer a selection of Greek inscriptions, from the birth of the polis in the Archaic Age to 31 BC. The documents are provided with complete lemma and critical apparatus, information about date and place of their discovery, Italian translation, commentary, and updated bibliography. This digital anthology has been selected according to a broader notion of ‘historical’ inscription, which includes those documents relevant not only for their political and institutional contents, but also for the social as well as cultural issues they display.
    Specific queries can be carried out with our Search functions, browsing the entire collection and using the interactive Map.
    The Project is patronised by Istituto Italiano per la Storia Antica and has an affiliation agreement with Europeana EAGLE Project.
    Il Progetto AXON nasce in seno alla Sezione Greca del Laboratorio di Epigrafia Greca diretta da Claudia Antonetti e trova in esso la sua sede scientifica ed operativa. Esso è stato finanziato dall’Università Ca’ Foscari nel quadro dei Progetti di Ateneo (PRA) 2013 e come tale è coordinato da Stefania De Vido.
    AXON intende presentare una silloge di iscrizioni greche selezionate in base alla loro rilevanza ‘storica’, valorizzando il documento epigrafico quale fonte indispensabile non solo per la ricostruzione dei diversi aspetti della storia politica o istituzionale del mondo greco, ma anche come fondamentale risorsa per l’indagine diretta a numerosi temi di storia sociale e culturale. Accogliendo tale accezione ‘ampia’ di iscrizione storica, la silloge abbraccia un arco temporale particolarmente esteso, dalla nascita della polis al 31 a.C., corrispondente ai termini convenzionalmente impiegati nella didattica per definire la ‘storia greca’.

    New in the Open Monograph Series Archéo.doct

    Finding the Limits of the Limes: Modelling Demography, Economy and Transport on the Edge of the Roman Empire

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    Finding the Limits of the Limes: Modelling Demography, Economy and Transport on the Edge of the Roman Empire
    • Philip Verhagen
    • Jamie Joyce
    • Mark R. Groenhuijzen
    Open Access
     Book

    Introduction

    This open access book demonstrates the application of simulation modelling and network analysis techniques in the field of Roman studies. It summarizes and discusses the results of a 5-year research project carried out by the editors that aimed to apply spatial dynamical modelling to reconstruct and understand the socio-economic development of the Dutch part of the Roman frontier (limes) zone, in particular the agrarian economy and the related development of settlement patterns and transport networks in the area. The project papers are accompanied by invited chapters presenting case studies and reflections from other parts of the Roman Empire focusing on the themes of subsistence economy, demography, transport and mobility, and socio-economic networks in the Roman period.
    The book shows the added value of state-of-the-art computer modelling techniques and bridges computational and conventional approaches. Topics that will be of particular interest to archaeologists are the question of (forced) surplus production, the demographic and economic effects of the Roman occupation on the local population, and the structuring of transport networks and settlement patterns. For modellers, issues of sensitivity analysis and validation of modelling results are specifically addressed. This book will appeal to students and researchers working in the computational humanities and social sciences, in particular, archaeology and ancient history.

    1. Front Matter
      Pages i-xvi
    2. Philip Verhagen, Jamie Joyce, Mark R. Groenhuijzen
      Pages 1-19 Open Access
    3. Demography and Settlement

    4. Economy

    5. Transport and Movement

      1. Front Matter
        Pages 215-215
      2. Philip Verhagen, Laure Nuninger, Mark R. Groenhuijzen
        Pages 217-249 Open Access
      3. César Parcero-Oubiña, Alejandro Güimil-Fariña, João Fonte, José Manuel Costa-García
        Pages 291-311 Open Access
      4. Katherine A. Crawford
        Pages 313-327 Open Access
    6. Back Matter
      Pages 329-337

    Open Access Journal: REUDAR. European Journal of Roman Architecture

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    REUDAR. European Journal of Roman Architecture
    ISSN: 2603-6177
    Page Header
    REUDAR aims to be a proactive scientific agent to enrich the European common culture which binds more than 300 millions of citizens. REUDARintends to achieve this enrichment of the European citizenship through its historical architecture, concretely, the Roman architecture, which influence in the different European Classicism styles and is so prevalent in the European urban landscapes. REUDAR was created with a vocation of union and consensus through the scientific debate, leaded by researchers from different European countries, with contributions in all the European languages. REUDAR seeks to be, in essence, a 3rd Millennium intellectual forum to share a common topic, which is, sometimes, scattered in a multiplicity of existing Classical Archaeology journals, with no intention of replacement. REUDAR intends to be a reference, a call for scientific creativity through science, brightness, innovation and change inherent to our common secular identity with the Roman architecture as a driving force.

    Vol 02 Num. 1-2 (2018)


    Enrique J. Montenegro Rúa
    7-27

    Núm. 1 (2017)

     

    Recent Open Access Publications from the Center for Hellenic Studies

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    Recent Open Access Publications from the Center for Hellenic Studies

    Now Online! | Plato’s Phaedo, translated by Gwenda-lin Grewal

    “You yourself, Phaedo, were you present with Socrates on that day on which he drank the poison in the prison, or did you hear from someone else?” Thus begins the account of the final day in the life of Socrates, as portrayed by Plato in the Phaedo, which the CHS is pleased to offer in a new translation by Gwenda-lin Grewal, Visiting Assistant Professor at Vassar College and Visiting Scholar at Harvard University. Read more…

    Now Online! | Achilles Unbound: Multiformity and Tradition in the Homeric Epics, by Casey Dué

    The CHS is pleased to announce the online publication of Achilles Unbound: Multiformity and Tradition in the Homeric Epics, by Casey Dué. Read more…

    Now Online! | Two curated articles by Thomas J. Figueira

    The CHS is pleased to announce the online publication of the article “Theognidea and Megarian Society,” along with a supplemental timeline “Chronological Table: Archaic Megara, 800-500 B.C.,” by historian Thomas J. Figueira. Read more…

    And See AWOL's List of Open Access Publications of the Center for Hellenic Studies

    Wissenschaftsgeschichte der Altertumswissenschaften

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    Wissenschaftsgeschichte der Altertumswissenschaften
     
     
    "Da steht mir der Verstand still". Adolf Harnack und Ulrich von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff über die Schmidt-Spiegelberg-Kontroverse
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Mülke, M. (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2003

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Die Altertumswissenschaften und die Kirchenväterkommission an der Akademie: Theodor Mommsen und Adolf Harnack
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Kocka, J. (Hrsg.)
    Year: 1999

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Die Erfindung der "Großforschung". Theodor Mommsen als Wissenschaftsorganisator
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: von Kaenel, H.-M. (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2004

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Leonidas und die Thermopylen. Zum Spartabild in der deutschen Altertumswissenschaft
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Luther, A. ; Meier, M. (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2006

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    "Mommsen ist er niemals näher getreten". Theodor Mommsen und Hermann Diels
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Calder, W.M. ; Mansfeld, J. (Hrsg.)
    Year: 1999

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Alfred Heuß: Ansichten seines Lebenswerkes. Mit einem Anhang: Alfred Heuß im Dritten Reich
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte:
    Year: 2000

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Otto Seeck, Theodor Mommsen und die "Römische Geschichte"
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Kneissl, P. ; Losemann, V. (Hrsg.)
    Year: 1998

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Otto Seeck und die Notwendigkeit, Alte Geschichte zu lehren
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Calder, W.M. ; Hose, M. ; Dubischar, M. ; Vogt-Spira, Gregor (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2000

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Theodor Mommsen, die deutschen Professoren und die Revolution von 1848
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Demandt, A. ; Goltz, A. ; Schlange-Schöningen, H. (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2005

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Zwischen Anpassung und Widerstand? Die Berliner Akademie der Wissenschaften von 1933 bis 1945
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Näf, B. (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2001

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    "Unser Werk lobt keinen Meister". Theodor Mommsen und die Wissenschaft vom Altertum
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Wiesehöfer, J. (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2005

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Theodor Mommsen. Wissenschaftler, Politiker, Literaturnobelpreisträger
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte:
    Year: 2003

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Hermann Bengtson an Walther Wüst
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Bernhard, A. ; Raulff, U. (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2005

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Akademie
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte:
    Year: 1999

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Der alte Meergreis, die Rose von Jericho und ein höchst vortrefflicher Schwiegersohn: Mommsen, Harnack und Wilamowitz
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Nowak, Kathrin ; Oexle, O.G. (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2001

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Der Briefwechsel zwischen Theodor Mommsen und Friedrich Althoff. Ein Editionsvorhaben der Historischen Kommission bei der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte:
    Year: 2001

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    From Thermopylae to Stalingrad. The Myth of Leonidas in German Historiography
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Powell, A. ; Hodkinson, St. (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2002

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Orbis Romanus. Deutungen der römischen Geschichte im Zeitalter des Historismus
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Nowak, Kathrin ; Oexle, O.G. ; Rendtorff, T. ; Selge, K.-V. (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2003

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Theodor Mommsen und das Verhältnis von Alter Geschichte und Patristik
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Herzog, Rudolf ; Fontaine, J. ; Pollmann, K. (Hrsg.)
    Year: 1993

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Historismus I. Allgemein
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte:
    Year: 2000

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Universität III. Neuzeit ab 1800
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte:
    Year: 2003

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Giovanni Battista de Rossi und Theodor Mommsen
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte:
    Year: 1995

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Mommsen, Harnack und die Prosopographie der Spätantike
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte:
    Year: 1997

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Die Altertumswissenschaften im 19. und 20. Jahrhundert
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Wirbelauer, E. (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2004

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Nationalsozialismus und Alte Geschichte. Kontinuität und Diskontinuität in Forschung und Lehre
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Stark, I. (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2005

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Römische Wertbegriffe: Wissenschaftsgeschichtliche Anmerkungen aus althistorischer Sicht
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Haltenhoff, A. ; Heil, A. ; Mutschler, F.-H. (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2005

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Adolf Erman und die Berliner Akadamie der Wissenschaften
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Schipper, Bernd U. (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2006

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Umgang mit toten Freunden – Droysen und das Altertum
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Rosenberger, Veit (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2008

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Hermann Bengtson und Alfred Heuß. Zur Entwicklung der Alten Geschichte in der Zwischen- und Nachkriegszeit
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Lehmann, Volker ; Droß, Kerstin ; Velte, Sarah (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2009

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Eduard Schwartz und die Alterumswissenschaften seiner Zeit
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte:
    Year: 2014

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Wilhelm von Humboldt oder: Die Entstehung des Bürgertums aus dem Geiste der Antike
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Chaniotis, Angelos ; Kuhn, Annika ; Kuhn, Christina (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2009

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    The making of a bourgeois antiquity: Wilhelm von Humboldt and greek history
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Schüren, Ute ; Segesser, Daniel Marc ; Späth, Thomas (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2015

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Deutsche Eindrücke. Alfred Heuß über das Dritte Reich im August 1934
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte:
    Year: 2012

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Die Altertumswissenschaften an der Preussischen Akademie der Wissenschaften in der Zeit von U. von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff (1848-1931), A. von Harnack (1851-1930) und E. Meyer (1855-1930)
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte:
    Year: 2014

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Christian asceticism and barbarian incursion: the making of a christian catastrophe
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte:
    Year: 2009

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Berlin und die antike Epigraphik
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Eck, Werner ; Funke, Peter ; Dohnicht, Marcus ; Hallof, Klaus ; Heil, Matthäus ; Schmidt, Manfred G. (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2014

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Ecco Montsene. Theodor Mommsen und Rom
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Wallraff, Martin ; Matheus, Michael ; Lauster, Jörg (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2011

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Eine Entzweiung. Theodor Mommsen und Heinrich von Treitschke
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Leihfried, Stefan ; Markschies, Christoph ; Osterkamp, Ernst ; Stock, Günter (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2015

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    «Geben Sie ihm eine gute Ermahnung mit auf den Weg und den Ordinarius.» Berufungspolitik und Schulbildung in der Alten Geschichte
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Hesse, Christian ; Schwinges, Rainer Christoph (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2012

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Das Handbuch der Klassischen Altertumswissenschaft: Enzyklopädisches Wissen im Zeitalter des Historismus
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Almazova, Nina ; Egorova, Sofia ; Keyer, Denis ; Verlinsky, Alexander (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2015

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    „Dass ein strahl von Hellas auf uns fiel“. Platon im George-Kreis
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte:
    Year: 2008

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Altertumswissenschaften zwischen Kaltem Krieg und Studentenrevolution. Zur Geschichte der Mommsen-Gesellschaft von 1950 bis 1968
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte:
    Year: 2015

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    “Ich komme schwerlich wieder”. Theodor Mommsen und das Deutsche Archäologische Institut
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Fenet, Annick ; Lubtchansky, Natacha (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2015

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Late Antiquity in Modern Eyes
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Rousseau, Philipp (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2009

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Vom Nutzen und Nachteil der Großwissenschaft. Altertumswissenschaftliche Unternehmungen an der Berliner Akademie und Universität im 19. Jahrhundert
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Baertschi, Annette M. ; King, Colin G. (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2009

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Le triumvirat scientifique. Mommsen, Harnack et Wilamowitz
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Bonnet, Corinne ; Krings, Véronique (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2008

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Hermann Bengtson (1909-1989)
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Weigand, Katharina (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2010

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Exercitationibus interfui historicis. Carl Friedrich Lehmann-Haupt, Theodor Mommsen und die Alte Geschichte
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Fink, Sebastian ; Eisterer, Klaus ; Rollinger, Robert ; Rubpnow, Dirk (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2015

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Personale Netzwerke und wissenschaftliche Normierung: Das Handbuch der klassischen Altertumswissenschaft
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte: Krierer, Karl R. ; Friedmann, Ina (Hrsg.)
    Year: 2016

    (Abstract / Full text)

     
    Spengler redivivus? Garth Fowden’s First Millennium
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte:
    Year: 2016

    (Abstract / Full text)
    Alte Geschichte zwischen Demokratie und Diktatur. Der Fall Helmut Berve
    Autor: Rebenich, Stefan
    Weitere Beteiligte:
    Year: 2001

    (Abstract / Full text)

    E-stampages

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    E-stampages
    https://www.e-stampages.eu/files/asset/3a2c45ab5484fc3ed3dab84283a95820065b705f.jpg
    E-STAMPAGES, ectypothèque numérique, offre à la consultation publique des images associées à des métadonnées redocumentarisées des importantes collections d'estampages qui furent produites, depuis la fin du XIXe siècle, lors des fouilles et études conduites par les épigraphistes de l'École française d'Athènes sur les sites de Thasos, Delphes, Délos et Philippesen Grèce.
     
    Issu d'un partenariat entre l’École française d’Athènes, le laboratoire Histoire et Sources des Mondes Antiques HiSoMA, le Pôle Système d’information et réseaux de la Maison de l’Orient et de la Méditerranée Jean Pouilloux et le Digital Epigraphy and Archaeology Project de l’Université de Floride,  le programme E-STAMPAGES fut initié dans le cadre de l'appel à projets 2014 de la Bibliothèque scientifique numérique (MESR-France). 
     
    E-STAMPAGES collabore depuis 2017 avec le Venice Squeeze Project pour la publication de la collection d'estampages du Laboratorio di Epigrafia Greca de l'Université Ca' Foscari.
     
    Version 1.0 mise en ligne en janvier 2019


    Digital Scholarly Editions: Call for Reviews

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    Digital Scholarly Editions: Call for Reviews
    RIDE is calling for reviews of scholarly digital editions and other related projects. We are particularly interested in reviews of some projects, which are listed here. Prospective reviewers are welcome to choose from this list or suggest a project for review to the Managing Editor. Please contact the Managing Editor if you would like to volunteer to review a project from the list or of your own choosing and include the project, your name and the institution you work for, as well as information regarding your qualification in the email. Please also check this page for projects that have already been assigned reviewers. Publications will be licensed under CC-BY. RIDE does not charge submission, processing or publication fees of any sort.
    Also check out our RIDE Award for the best review!
    This is the list of Suggested Projects for Review:

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    Multilingual Parallel Bible Corpus

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    Multilingual Parallel Bible Corpus
    Here you can find a multilingual parallel corpus created from translations of the Bible. This an effort to create a parallel corpus containing as many languages as possible that could be used for a number of NLP tasks. Using the Book, Chapter and Verse indices the corpus is aligned (almost) at a sentence level. (There are cases where two verses in one language are translated as one in another)

    Following a similar effort by Philip Resnik and Mari Broman Olsen at the University of Maryland (website) I have encoded the text of each language in XML files using the Corpus Encoding Standard

    The following table contains the XML Bibles in 100 languages (all the languages that an electronic version was freely available online) along with information about each language from Ethnologue

    Open Access Journal: Meander

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    [First posted in AWOL 1 January 2015, updated 22  February 2019]

    Meander
    ISSN: 0025-6285
    Meander Cover Image
    "Meander" was first issued in 1946 by two distinguished classical scholars, Kazimierz Kumaniecki and Kazimierz Michalowski. It covers a wide range of issues related to classical studies, including classical languages, ancient history and philosophy, the reception of Greek and Roman culture in Europe, and the classical scholarship in Poland. It presents work of both leading and younger Polish scholars. The articles are scholarly, yet intended to reach the wider audience of non-classicists interested in ancient culture.

    Starting with the year 2013 the journal frequency has changed to annual.
      1 The Seaside as a Place of Relax and Contemplation in Ancient Literature

        Online digitized searchable Reallexikon der Assyriologie und Vorderasiatischen Archäologie

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        Online digitized searchable Reallexikon der Assyriologie und Vorderasiatischen Archäologie

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