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Classics and Social Justice

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Classics and Social Justice
The purpose of the group is to bring together those scholars in the field who are working in various ways on social justice, using Classics. This work is a form of outreach that brings Classics out of the academy and returns it to the least privileged in our society; we seek to draw together those trained in our field who are in some cases giving intellectual life-lines to those in nearly hopeless situations: the incarcerated, veterans, and children with least access to quality education. Each of these has so many underexplored dimensions and is too little visible at the SCS even though many individuals in the discipline are doing such work. Our goal is to create a dialogue about how Classicists and their students are using Classics, texts, traditions, and receptions, to address problems of inequality–social, educational, economic, etc.

The group members will discuss the practicalities of their programs and the theoretical structures that could help individual practitioners and expand our field’s interaction in the world outside of academia. We envision addressing such questions as: Should we use our positions in the academy as a springboard for activism? How do we include students and still teach them? What kinds of engaged work helps us foster our communities? How can we use art as an instrument of social justice?
The Committee sees these programs as continuing the work of opening the Classics beyond the elite; at the same time, advancing the discipline by showing the importance of a liberal education in the 21st century: the role of Classics in these marginalized settings gives new evidence of its value. By drawing into the field voices that have previously not been part of it, Classics as a discipline stands to benefit greatly. Invigorating new perspectives on Classical texts emerge from this work outside the traditional classroom. Thus, our discussions include the ways in which teaching outside the academy changes us as educators and how we see our profession.

Many in the teaching professions are beginning to wonder how we can call attention to the fundamental inequality between those who receive an education and those who do not and the role that this inequality plays in the problem of mass incarceration, and what we can do to help mend this inequality. The work of a Committee on Classics and Social Justice can advance that conversation and potentially rehabilitate our field — by establishing real connections to the communities outside of the academy in which Classics is very much alive and proving practically useful — just as much as it considers how we as Classicists can offer something to the rehabilitation of those in difficult life circumstances.

Open Access Journal: Bulletin d’études orientales

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[First posted in AWOL 25 December 2013, updated 17 January 2017]

Le Bulletin d’études orientales
ISSN électronique 2077-4079
Logo de l'Ifpo
Le Bulletin d’études orientales (BEO) est une revue scientifique créée en 1931 à l’initiative des chercheurs français travaillant au Proche-Orient dans le cadre de l’institut de recherche fondé initialement à Damas en 1922 pour étudier l’archéologie islamique et l’art proche-oriental ; la création du BEO a correspondu à un élargissement des champs d’intérêt et des disciplines à bien d’autres sciences humaines. Actuellement, le Bulletin d’études orientales publie des articles écrits par des universitaires, chercheurs ou doctorants spécialisés dans les domaines suivants Archéologie et histoire de l’art du Proche-Orient à l’époque islamique (à partir du VIIe siècle) ; Histoire du Proche-Orient depuis la conquête arabe (VIIe siècle) jusqu’à la fin de l’empire ottoman (1918) ; Littérature de langue arabe, classique et contemporaine ; Linguistique arabe ; Histoire de la pensée religieuse musulmane (« islamologie »), mais aussi chrétienne ou juive de langue arabe ; philosophie médiévale de langue arabe ; Histoire des sciences et des techniques dans le Proche-Orient d’époque islamique.
Les comptes rendus sont publiés uniquement en ligne sur ce site depuis décembre 2012.


Comptes rendus



Varia électroniques



Open Access Journal: Les Nouvelles de l’archéologie

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Les Nouvelles de l’archéologie
ISSN: 0242-7702
Fondée en 1979, la revue se veut à la fois un lieu de débat et le reflet des évolutions de la discipline. Quatre fois par an, elle présente aujourd’hui des problématiques scientifiques de pointe, sous forme de dossiers et dans une perspective internationale. Les articles peuvent être sollicités par la revue ou émaner de propositions spontanées. Ils sont soumis au comité de lecture qui peut demander des modifications. L’abondance d’information peut conduire à différer la publication d’un article de six mois.

Numéros en texte intégral

Resources for Teaching Ancient Geography

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Resources for Teaching Ancient Geography
From History From Below: Musings on Daily Life in the Ancient and Early Medieval Mediterranean By Sarah E. Bond

Making Maps

Antiquity À-la-carte“The Antiquity À-la-carte application is a web-based GIS interface and interactive digital atlas of the ancient world, featuring accurate historical, cultural, and geographical data produced by the AWMC in addition to the entire Pleiades Project feature set. The map is completely searchable with customizable features, allowing for the creation of any map covering Archaic Greece to Late Antiquity and beyond. AWMC welcomes feedback from community members on the experience of using the application and welcomes suggestions and comments. Click here ... to launch the map application. This application works best with Firefox, Chrome, or Safari. All site content and maps are released here under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC 3.0) license.”

Big Ancient Mediterranean: A project that marries texts, network analysis, and ancient geography. It currently allows you to see the people and places in the Book of Luke within the module Terra Biblica–built to house texts connected to early Christianity–and to explore a map of Latin authors. Project PIs are Sarah Bond, Paul Dilley, and Ryan Horne.

CartoDB: “is a Software as a Service (SaaS) cloud computing platform that provides GIS and web mapping tools for display in a web browser. CartoDB users can use the company’s free platform or deploy their own instance of the open source software. CartoDB is offered as freemium service, where accounts are free up to a certain size. For larger accounts, a fee is applied.[1] It was first released in Beta at FOSS4G in Denver in September 2011,[2] and officially debuted as a final release at Where2.0 in April 2012.” (Description via Wikipedia)

GPS Visualizer“GPS Visualizer is do-it-yourself mapping, for both beginners and power users. Its strengths are its simplicity and flexibility in terms of input, and its enormous number of options regarding the output. When you upload your GPS data, GPS Visualizer will automatically detect what kind of file it is and process it accordingly. The output can be in the form of Google Maps, KML files for Google Earth, JPEG maps, SVG drawings, elevation profiles, plain-text tables with all your raw data, or GPX files that can be used with many other GPS-related applications. Moreover, all of the maps and profiles can be adjusted in innumerable ways using the options on the input forms: you can change the size, the colors, the background map, etc. In the case of Google Maps, there is even more you can do to edit your map after it’s been created, if you’re comfortable with HTML and/or JavaScript.”

Google Earth and Google Earth Pro: Google Earth reads and produces a file called KML. “KML, or ‘Keyhole Markup Language’, is an XML grammar and file format for modeling and storing geographic features such as points, lines, images, polygons, and models for display in Google Earth, Google Maps and other applications. You can use KML to share places and information with other users of these applications. You can find example KML files on the KML Gallery and Google Earth Community site that describe interesting features and places.”

Harvard World Map: “WorldMap is an open source web mapping system that is currently under construction. It is built to assist academic research and teaching as well as the general public and supports discovery, investigation, analysis, visualization, communication and archiving of multi-disciplinary, multi-source and multi-format data, organized spatially and temporally. The first instance of WorldMap, focused on the continent of Africa, is called AfricaMap. Since its beta release in November of 2008, the framework has been implemented in several geographic locations with different research foci, including metro Boston, East Asia, Vermont, Harvard Forest and the city of Paris. These web mapping applications are used in courses as well as by individual researchers.”
Leaflet: “Leaflet is a modern open-source JavaScript library for mobile-friendly interactive maps. It is developed by Vladimir Agafonkin with a team of dedicated contributors. Weighing just about 33 KB of JS, it has all the features most developers ever need for online maps. Leaflet is designed with simplicity, performance and usability in mind. It works efficiently across all major desktop and mobile platforms out of the box, taking advantage of HTML5 and CSS3 on modern browsers while still being accessible on older ones. It can be extended with a huge amount of plugins, has a beautiful, easy to use and well-documented API and a simple, readable source code that is a joy to contribute to.”

LEGO Build with Chrome: is a web application that allows users to explore and build a world of digital LEGOcreations. A collaboration between Google Chrome and The LEGO Group, Build with Chrome was originally developed by a team ofGoogle Australia developers for the LEGO Festival of Play. In January 2014, the Google Chrome team opened up Build with Chrome to everyone and added features such as the ability to sign in with aGoogle Plusaccount to help you find builds that people in your circles have created, a new categorization system for completed builds, andBuild Academy.” (Pulled from Lego.Wikia)

MapBox: “is one of the biggest providers of custom online maps for major websites such as Foursquare, Pinterest,Evernote, the Financial Times and Uber Technologies.[2] Since 2010, it has rapidly expanded the niche of custom maps, as a response to the limited choice offered by map providers such as Google Maps.[2] Mapbox is the creator of, or a significant contributor to many popular open source mapping libraries and applications, including the MBTiles specification, the TileMill cartography IDE, the Leaflet JavaScript library, the CartoCSS map styling language and parser, and the mapbox.js JavaScript library.” (Description via Wikipedia)

Pelagios Project: A great tool for geography and for finding material culture for a certain area. It plugs you into the linked open data network for antiquity–e.g. inscriptions, ceramics, coins, and archaeological remains. Via the Pelagios Blog: “The aim of [the] work with Pelagios has been to create a static (non-layered) map of the ancient places in the Pleiades dataset with the capacity to serve as a background layer to online mapping applications of the Ancient World. Because it is based on ancient settlements and uses ancient placenames, our map presents a visualisation more tailored to archaeological and historical research, for which modern mapping interfaces, such as Google Maps, are hardly appropriate; it even includes non-settlement data such as the Roman roads network, some aqueducts and defence walls (limes, city walls). Thus, for example, the tiles can be used as a background layer to display the occurrence of find-spots, archaeological sites, etc., thereby creating new opportunities to put data of these kinds in their historical context.”

Tools

DIRT: Digital Research Tools“The DiRT Directory aggregates information about digital research tools for scholarly use. It evolved from “Bamboo DiRT”, a version of the directory developed by Project Bamboo, which itself developed out of Lisa Spiro’s DiRT wiki. The DiRT Directory makes it easy for digital humanists and others conducting digital research to find and compare resources ranging from content management systems to music OCR, statistical analysis packages to mindmapping software.”

Google Fusion Tables: “Fusion Tables is an experimental data visualization web application to gather, visualize, and share data tables.”

Esri’s StoryMapA video tutorial for using Esri’s Story Maps. Check out Odysseus’ Journey HERE. 

World Atlas: Find Longitude and Latitude: Find longitude and latitude coordinates quickly. Caveat internetor: Ancient places are not this Atlas’ strong point. Go with the Pleiades data.

Free Data 

Data.govDownloadable data from the US government.

Eurogeographics: “EuroGlobalMap is a 1:1 million scale topographic dataset covering 45 countries and territories in the European region.It is now available as opendata. EuroGlobalMap is perfect for use as background to many applications from planning, monitoring and network analysis to presenting environmental policies.”

Pleiades: “Get complete and regular shapshots of all Pleiades resources, available in multiple formats including CSV, KML, and RDF.”

USGS: The National Map: “The Global Map is an international effort by national mapping organizations to produce consistent and accurate mapping data of the world at a scale of 1:1,000,000. The 1997-2014 Edition of the National Atlas of the United States originally supplied all American data to the Global Map. The National Map will continue to publish two data collections at one million-scale: one for Global Map users and one for National Map users. In terms of vector geometry, the lines, points, and areas in these data collections are identical. The difference is in the attributes assigned to these features. The Global Map edition includes just the data fields and attribute values in the Global Map Specifications Version 2.2. National Map vector data includes all of the Global Map data fields and attributes plus those in the National Map data dictionary.”

GIS Classes (Some Free, Some Not So Free)

ESRI Virtual Campus Courses: online, self-paced, step by step lessons that cover a variety of topics related to GIS applications and technology. Currently there are 40+ course selections to choose from that are included with our standard subscription, and many more seminars are available that are free to the public.”

Coursera: “Maps and the Geospatial Revolution”: “This course brings together core concepts in cartography, geographic information systems, and spatial thinking with real-world examples to provide the fundamentals necessary to engage with Geography beyond the surface-level. We will explore what makes spatial information special, how spatial data is created, how spatial analysis is conducted, and how to design maps so that they’re effective at telling the stories we wish to share. To gain experience using this knowledge, we will work with the latest mapping and analysis software to explore geographic problems.”

Classroom Activities 

Google Editable Map: Ask students to contribute to an editable map and place information about themselves on it. This is a great way to start off a class and introduce spatial thinking, maps, layers, and data sharing.

Serpent Column: This activity explore the monument of the “serpent column” and how we can represent inscriptions and other textual sources geographically using Pleiades.stoa.org. The full Pleiades workshop video with this activity is available for viewing HERE.

Mapping Spartacus: Using Pleiades.stoa.org in order to teach the Third Servile War (i.e. The Spartacan War).

Finding Digital Humanities Projects

Centernet:Find Digital Humanities Centers.

HASTAC


Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies - De Gruyter Open - Published in 2016

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Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies - De Gruyter Open - Published in 2016

Understanding Material Text Cultures (2016)

Ed. by Hilgert, Markus
ISBN: 978-3-11-041784-5
Product Type: Books
Format: eBook (PDF)
Also available as Hardcover, eBook (EPUB)

Board Game Studies Journal

Product Type: Journals/Yearbooks
Format: Online
DE GRUYTER OPEN

Materiality of Writing in Early Mesopotamia (2016)

Ed. by Balke, Thomas E. / Tsouparopoulou, Christina
ISBN: 978-3-11-045963-0
Product Type: Books
Format: eBook (PDF)
Also available as eBook (EPUB), Hardcover

Sarri, Antonia

Material Aspects of Letter Writing in the Graeco-Roman World (to be published April 2017)

ISBN: 978-3-11-042695-3
Product Type: Books
Format: eBook (PDF)
Also available as Hardcover, eBook (EPUB)

Stol, Marten

Women in the Ancient Near East (2016)

ISBN: 978-1-61451-263-9
Product Type: Books
Format: eBook (PDF)
Also available as Hardcover, eBook (EPUB)

Writing Matters (to be published June 2017)

Ed. by Berti, Irene / Bolle, Katharina / Opdenhoff, Fanny / Stroth, Fabian
ISBN: 978-3-11-053459-7
Product Type: Books
Format: eBook (PDF)
Also available as Hardcover, eBook (EPUB)

Metatexte (2016)

Ed. by Focken, Friedrich-Emanuel / Ott, Michael R.
ISBN: 978-3-11-041794-4
Product Type: Books
Format: eBook (PDF)
Also available as Hardcover, eBook (EPUB)

Galeni in Hippocratis epidemiarum librum commentaria...

Volume 2,1 Galeni In Hippocratis Epidemiarum librum II Commentariorum I-III versio Arabica (2016)

Ed. by Vagelpohl, Uwe
ISBN: 978-3-11-045405-5
Product Type: Books
Format: eBook (PDF)
Also available as eBook (EPUB), Hardcover

Galeni in Hippocratis epidemiarum librum commentaria...

Volume 2,2 Galeni in Hippocratis Epidemiarum librum II commentariorum IV-VI versio Arabica et indices (2016)

Ed. by Vagelpohl, Uwe
ISBN: 978-3-11-046398-9
Product Type: Books
Format: eBook (PDF)
Also available as Hardcover, eBook (EPUB), Print/eBook

Kröll, Nicole

Die Jugend des Dionysos (2016)

ISBN: 978-3-11-041920-7
Product Type: Books
Format: eBook (PDF)
Also available as Hardcover, eBook (EPUB)

Gass, Anton

Das Siebenstromland zwischen Bronze- und Früheisenzeit (2016)

ISBN: 978-3-11-031119-8
Product Type: Books
Format: eBook (PDF)
Also available as Hardcover, eBook (EPUB)

Kinetic Landscapes (2016)

Ed. by Düring, Bleda S. / Glatz, Claudia
ISBN: 978-3-11-044497-1
Product Type: Books
Format: eBook (PDF)
Also available as Hardcover, eBook (EPUB)
DE GRUYTER OPEN

Open Archaeology

Product Type: Journals/Yearbooks
Format: Online
DE GRUYTER OPEN

V. Galeni in Hippocratis epidemiarum librum commentaria...

Vagelpohl, Uwe

Volume 1 Galeni In Hippocratis Epidemiarum librum I commentariorum I-III versio Arabica (2014)

ISBN: 978-3-11-040659-7
Product Type: Books
Format: eBook (PDF)
Also available as Hardcover
DE GRUYTER AKADEMIE FORSCHUNG

Sommerstein, Alan H. / Torrance, Isabelle C.

Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014)

ISBN: 978-3-11-022736-9
Product Type: Books
Format: eBook (PDF)
Also available as Hardcover, eBook (EPUB)

Bremmer, Jan N.

Initiation into the Mysteries of the Ancient World (2014)

ISBN: 978-3-11-029955-7
Product Type: Books
Format: eBook (PDF)
Also available as Print/eBook, Hardcover, eBook (EPUB)

Prosopographie der mittelbyzantinischen Zeit Online

Product Type: Databases
Format: Online

Population Dynamics in Prehistory and Early History (2012)

Ed. by Kaiser, Elke / Burger, Joachim / Schier, Wolfram
ISBN: 978-3-11-026630-6
Product Type: Books
Format: eBook (PDF)
Also available as Hardcover

A virtual trek through Petra with Google Cardboard

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A virtual trek through Petra with Google Cardboard

Dickinson College Commentaries

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 [First posted in AWOL 18 May 2012, updated 18 January 2017]

Dickinson College Commentaries


 
Latin and Greek texts with explanatory notes, vocabulary, and graphic, video and audio elements, for readers of Greek and Latin. Submissions to the series are welcome.
Dickinson College Commentaries presents Latin and Greek texts for reading, with explanatory notes, interpretive essays, vocabulary, and multimedia elements. The format has two columns, one with plain text on the left, and another on the right with three tabs for notes, vocabulary, and media. The commentaries are peer-reviewed, citable scholarly resources, licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License (CC BY-SA). Support for the project comes from the Christopher Roberts Fund for Classical Studies at Dickinson College, the Mellon Fund for Digital Humanities at Dickinson College, and Dickinson's Research and Development Committee. The Project Director is Christopher Francese, Asbury J. Clarke Professor of Classical Studies at Dickinson College (francese@dickinson.edu).
Portrait of Julius Caesar in Greek marble, recently found in a cistern (#861) from the Pantelleria acropolis in Sicily. Photo: Roger B. Ulrich

Tacitus

Agricola
Read Online
Portrait of Julius Caesar in Greek marble, recently found in a cistern (#861) from the Pantelleria acropolis in Sicily. Photo: Roger B. Ulrich

Vergil

Aeneid  Selections
Read Online

Tacitus, Annals 15.20–23, 33–45

Read Online
Get Print Book

Allen & Greenough’s Latin Grammar

Read Online
Portrait of Julius Caesar in Greek marble, recently found in a cistern (#861) from the Pantelleria acropolis in Sicily. Photo: Roger B. Ulrich

Caesar

Gallic War selections
Read Online

Callimachus

Aetia
Read Online

Cicero

Against Verres 2.1.53–86
Read Online
Get Print Book

Cicero

On Pompey’s Command (De Imperio), 27-49
Read Online
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Core Vocabularies

Latin and Ancient Greek
Read Online

Cornelius Nepos

Life of Hannibal
Read online
Get Print Book

Lucian

True Histories, Book 1
Read Online
Get Print Book

Ovid

Amores Book 1
Read Online
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Sulpicius Severus

The Life of Saint Martin of Tours
Read Online
   

Chester Beatty Papyri at The Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts (CSNTM)

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Chester Beatty Papyri at The Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts (CSNTM)
logo 
The Chester Beatty papyri, published in the 1930s and 1950s, are some of the oldest and most important biblical manuscripts known to exist. Housed at the Chester Beatty Library (CBL) in Dublin, they have attracted countless visitors every year. It is safe to say that the only Greek biblical manuscripts that might receive more visitors are Codex Sinaiticus and Codex Alexandrinus, both on display at the British Library.

The Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts (CSNTM) is pleased to announce that a six-person team, in a four-week expedition during July–August 2013, digitized all the Greek biblical papyri at the Chester Beatty Library. The CBL has granted permission to CSNTM to post the images.

 
Number Type Date
Rahlfs 963 Papyrus 2nd Century
Second century manuscript on papyrus; 55 leaves, 2 columns, fragmentary, up to 36 lines per column; Contents: LXX (Septuagint) Numbers and Deuteronomy. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: Rahlfs 963 (CBL BP VI)
Rahlfs 2149 Papyrus 4th Century
Fourth century manuscript on papyrus; 4 leaves, single column, up to 34 lines per column; Contents: LXX (Septuagint): Psalms 72.6–88.2 (sans Ps76). Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL BP XIII
Rahlfs 2150 Papyrus 4th Century
Fourth century manuscript on papyrus; 1 leaf, single column, 30 lines per column. Contents: LXX (Septuagint): Psalms 31, 26, and 2. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL BP XIV
Rahlfs 968 Papyrus 3rd Century
Early third century manuscript on papyrus; 13 leaves, Single Column, 26 lines per column. Contents: LXX (Septuagint): Daniel and Esther. Images are from the Chester Beatty Library Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL BP X
Rahlfs 965 Papyrus 3rd Century
Early third century manuscript on papyrus; 36 leaves, single column; Contents: LXX (Septuagint) Isaiah. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: Rahlfs 965 (CBL BP VII)
Rahlfs 962 Papyrus 3rd Century
Late third century manuscript on papyrus; 31 leaves, single column, up to 20 lines per column; Contents: LXX (Septuagint) Genesis 8–46. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL BP V
Rahlfs 961 Papyrus 4th Century
Early fourth century manuscript on papyrus; 51 leaves, 2 columns, fragmentary, up to 38 lines per column; Contents: LXX (Septuagint) Genesis 9–44. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL BP IV
Rahlfs 964 Papyrus 4th Century
Fourth century manuscript on papyrus; 2 leaves, single column, 33 lines per column; Contents: LXX (Septuagint) Ecclesiasticus (Sirach) 36.28–37.11; 37.1–122. 46.16b–47.2; 46.6–11. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: Rahlfs 964 (CBL BP XI)
Rahlfs 967 Papyrus 3rd Century
Early third century manuscript on papyrus; 9 leaves, 2 columns, fragmentary, up to 32 lines; Contents: LXX (Septuagint) Ezekiel and Esther. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: Rahlfs 967 (CBL BP IX)
Rahlfs 966 Papyrus 2nd or 3rd Century
Late second century or early third century manuscript on papyrus; 2 leaves, single column, fragmentary, up to 15 lines per column; Contents: LXX (Septuagint) Jeremiah 4.30–5.1; 5.9–13; 5.13–14; 5.23–24. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL BP VIII
Not yet catalogued Papyrus Unknown
Manuscript on papyrus; 1 leaf, fragmentary; Contents: LXX (Septuagint) Genesis, Enoch and Romans (folio 18 of P46). Images from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL BP 190
Not yet catalogued Papyrus 4th or 5th Century
Fourth or fifth century manuscript on papyrus; 1 leaf, fragmentary; Contents: Apology of Phileas and unknown text. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL BP X001
Not yet catalogued Papyrus 4th Century
Fourth century manuscript on papyrus; 8 Leaves + 1 fragment plate, single column, up to 44 lines per column; Contents: LXX (Septuagint); Enoch and Melito. Images from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL BP XII
Not yet catalogued Papyrus 3rd or 4th Century
Third or fourth century manuscript on papyrus; 8 leaves, single column; Contents: the Apocryphon of Jannes and Jambres the Magicians. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL BP XVI
Not yet catalogued Lectionary 12th Century
Late twelfth century Armenian lectionary of the Gospels on parchment; 259 leaves, 2 columns, 21 lines per column. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL ARM 624
P46 Papyrus 2nd-3rd Century
Late second century or early third century (c. 200) manuscript of Paul on papyrus; 86 leaves, single column, 23–26 lines per column. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL BP II (Dublin)
P47 Papyrus 3rd Century
Late third century manuscript of Revelation on papyrus; 10 leaves, single column, 25–30 lines per column. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL BP III
P97 Papyrus 6th–7th Century
Sixth or seventh century manuscript of the Gospels on papyrus; 1 leaf, single column, 11–27 lines per column. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL BP XVII
P99 Papyrus 5th Century
Late fifth century manuscript of Paul on papyrus; Greek-Latin diglot; 16 leaves (8 bifolia), single column, 27–32 lines per column. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL BP XXI
GA 106 Minuscule 11th–12th Century
Eleventh or twelfth century minuscule of the Gospels on parchment; 212 leaves, single column, 22 lines per column. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Chester Beatty Library, Dublin
Shelf Number: CBL W 135
GA 2603 Minuscule 12th Century
Twelfth century minuscule of the Gospels on parchment; 255 leaves, single column, 24-26 lines per column. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL W 134
GA 2604 Minuscule 12th Century
Twelfth century minuscule of the Gospels with commentary on parchment; 378 leaves, single column, 20 lines per column. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL W 139
GA 2605 Minuscule 13th Century
Thirteenth century minuscule of the Gospels on parchment; 176 leaves, single column, 24-27 lines per column. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL W 140
GA 2606 Minuscule 13th Century
Thirteenth century minuscule of the Gospels on parchment; 119 leaves, single column, 28–30 lines per column. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL W 141
GA Lect 1026 Lectionary 17th Century
Seventeenth century (1647) lectionary of the Gospels on paper; 1 leaf, 2 columns, 27 lines per column. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL W 143.4.13
GA Lect 1027 Lectionary 17th Century
Seventeenth century (1610) lectionary of the Gospels on paper; 14 leaves, single column, 29 lines per column. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL W 143.4.4–12, 14, 15; 143.5.1, 2, 4
GA Lect 1030 Lectionary 16th Century
Sixteenth century (1596) lectionary of the Gospels on paper; 1 leaf, single column, 18 lines per column. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL W 143.5.3
GA Lect 1031 Lectionary 16th Century
Sixteenth century (1599) lectionary of the Gospels on paper; 3 leaves, 2 columns, 25 lines per column. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL W 143.4.1, 2, 3
GA Lect 1957 Lectionary 10th–11th Century
Tenth or eleventh century majuscule lectionary on parchment; 200 leaves, 2 columns, 22 lines per column; Contents: lectionary contains weekday readings from Easter to Pentecost, and Saturday and Sunday readings for other weeks. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL W 138
GA Lect 2450 Lectionary 11th Century
Eleventh century lectionary of the Gospels on parchment; 1 leaf, 2 columns, 24 lines per column. This manuscript is included in the CBL ARM 624. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library
Shelf Number: CBL ARM 624
P45 Papyrus 3rd Century
Third century manuscript of the Gospels on papyrus; 30 leaves, single column, approximately 32-33 lines per column. Images are from the Chester Beatty Collection.
Location: Dublin, Chester Beatty Library and Vienna, Austrian National Library
Shelf Number: CBL BP I (Dublin), Pap. G. 31974 (Vienna)
P66 Papyrus 2nd–3rd Century
Late second or early third century manuscript of the Gospels on papyrus; 1 leaf, single column, 10–11 lines per column. Public images are from the Chester Beatty Collection. Images from other institutions available for private viewing.
Location: Cologny/Genf, Bodmeriana; Dublin, Chester Beatty Library; Cologne, Univ. Inst. fur Altertumskunde
Shelf Number: various

Protection of Cultural Property, Military Manual

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Protection of Cultural Property, Military Manual
O'Keefe, Roger, Péron, Camille, Musayev, Tofig and Ferrari, Gianluca (2016) Protection of Cultural Property, Military Manual. Manual. UNESCO, PARIS, 91p. ISBN 978-92-3-100184-0. [Book]
[img] PDF
Protecting Cultural Property Military Manual UNESCO Blue Shield 246633e.pdf
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike.
Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract (in English)

Unesco published this manual in order to enhance the importance of military and security forces'involvement in the protection of cultural heritage in times of conflicts. This is a practical guide to the implementation by military forces of rules of international law for the protection of cultural property in armed conflict.
Item Type: Book (Manual)
Authors:
Authors Email
O'Keefe, Roger UNSPECIFIED
Péron, Camille UNSPECIFIED
Musayev, Tofig UNSPECIFIED
Ferrari, Gianluca UNSPECIFIED
Languages: English
Keywords: armed conflicts; protection of cultural heritage; military; guidelines; manuals; international meetings; international organizations; damages; destruction of cultural heritage; vandalism; international rules; cultural property; tools
Subjects: G.DETERIORATION > 02. Causes of deterioration
G.DETERIORATION > 05. Prevention of deterioration
K.LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE ISSUES > 02. International legislation
K.LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE ISSUES > 05. International organizations
Number of Pages: 91
ISBN: 978-92-3-100184-0
Depositing User: Mrs Lucile Smirnov
Date Deposited: 19 Jan 2017 12:45
Last Modified: 19 Jan 2017 12:45
URI: http://openarchive.icomos.org/id/eprint/1739

Open Access Journal: Polis: revista de ideas y formas políticas de la Antigüedad

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Archaeopress: Open Access

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 [First posted in AWOL 29 July 2014, updated 19 January 2017]

Archaeopress: Open Access
Archaeopress logo
Open Access content is available to view online or you can download to your chosen device. All content is in PDF format. You are welcome to share Open Access content amongst your colleagues but please be sure to cite it fully and accurately. To learn more about publishing in Archaeopress Open Access please contact archaeo@archaeopress.com
Time Periods

Bronze Age and Iron Age
Classical and Hellenistic
Early Modern and Modern
Late Antiquity and Byzantium
Migration Period, Early Medieval and Medieval
Multiperiod
Neolithic / Chalcolithic
Palaeolithic / Mesolithic
Prehistory (general titles only)
Roman

Geographical Areas

Africa
Arabia
Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific
British Isles
Central and Eastern Europe
Central and South America and the Caribbean
Central and South Asia
Egypt and Sudan
Far East
Greece, Aegean, Crete and Black Sea
Levant / Near East
Mediterranean
Mesopotamia
North America
Scandinavia
Western Europe and Britain

Subject Areas

Agriculture / Farming / Husbandry / Land-use / Irrigation
Archaeobotany / Environment and Climate
Archaeometry / Scientific Dating
Archaeozoology / Bioarchaeology / Osteoarchaeology
Architecture / Domestic and Urban Buildings and Space / Urbanism
Art / Sculpture / Gems / Seals
Ceramics and Pottery Studies
Computing and Quantitative Methods
Craft working (general titles, bone, glass, textiles, etc.)
Death / Burial / Cemeteries / Tombs
Epigraphy / Ancient and Medieval Texts / Papyri
Ethnoarchaeology / Anthropology
Excavation / Fieldwork / Survey
Experimental Archaeology
History of Archaeology
Human Origins
Hunter-Gatherers / Hunting
Landscape Archaeology
Lithics / Stone Tools
Maritime and Underwater Archaeology
Metal Objects
Metallurgy / Mining
Military / Fortifications / Conflict
Museum Studies / Conservation / Heritage / Education
Numismatics
Remote Sensing, GIS and Aerial Photography
Ritual / Religion / Temples
Rock-Art / Semiotics
Theory and Method (general titles)
Trade / Exchange / Travel / Economy

Open Access Journal: Vita Latina

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Vita Latina
ISSN: 0042-7306
eISSN: 1783-1830
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Créée en 1957 dans le cadre des expériences de latin vivant, la revue Vita Latina est éditée par l’Association du même nom qui était originellement implantée en Avignon avant d’être hébergée en 1994 par l’université Montpellier III ; elle a pendant longtemps été entièrement rédigée en latin et, outre des articles sur les auteurs classiques, elle contenait des créations littéraires originales (poèmes, courts récits) et des réflexions sur l’actualité.
Son orientation éditoriale a évolué et elle s’adresse aujourd’hui à tous ceux qui souhaitent rester informés dans tous les domaines de la recherche en études anciennes (littérature, histoire, philologie, archéologie, philosophie, religion, mythologie, arts, architecture), des origines à l’Antiquité tardive, avec une spécificité pour les auteurs aux programmes des Agrégations de Lettres ou de Philosophie

1989-1999

2000-2009

2010-...


Launched: The Humanities Digital Library: Classics from the Institute of Classical Studies

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The Humanities Digital Library launched this week.

Humanities Digital Library 
The Humanities Digital Library is the open access library and catalogue for books published by the School of Advanced Study, University of London. It forms part of the School’s mission to embrace the opportunities of digital content delivery and enable greater access to knowledge. The Humanities Digital Library is managed by the Institute of Historical Research (IHR) and the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS).

We publish new titles, through our open access programmes, as well as open access versions of books previously available only in print. Each book is available as an open access PDF (full text) but can also be purchased in print (hardback and paperback) or as an ebook (EPUB format). Scholarly content made available through the website includes monographs, edited collections and shorter form works.

With open access providing increased accessibility and visibility to scholarly research, and becoming ever more relevant to research and funding councils, the Humanities Digital Library aims to bring together and promote freely available research for the School, its constituent Institutes and the wider humanities community.

In the first of our publishing partnerships, the Institute of Historical Research is working alongside the Royal Historical Society to bring their new open access series, New Historical Perspectives to the Humanities Digital Library. We expect the first books to be published in 2017-18. Learn more about our Partnerships.

The Open Access project team behind the Humanities Digital Library are: Jane Winters, Chair in Digital Humanities at the School of Advanced Study; Steve Whittle, Information Systems Manager at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies; Philip Carter, Head of Digital at the Institute of Historical Research; and Jon Newbury, Publishing Manager at the Institute of Historical Research.
The website is managed by Jon Newbury, Publishing Manager, jonathan.newbury@sas.ac.uk.
Among the initial set of subjects is Classics from the Institute of Classical Studies is the following volume listed as forthcoming in early 2017"
Profession and Performance: Aspects of oratory in the Greco-Roman World
Editors: Christos Kremmydas, Jonathan Powell, Lene Rubinstein
*THIS FORTHCOMING EBOOK WILL BE AVAILABLE IN EARLY 2017*
This volume brings together six papers relating to oratory and orators in public fora of Classical Greece and Rome. Edwards and Bers explore aspects of oratorical delivery in the Athenian courts and Assembly, including the demands placed on orators by the physical settings. Tempest examines the conceptions of oratorical competence and incompetence, particularly in respect of performance, as they are implied in Cicero’s criticisms of the rival prosecutor in the trial of Verres. Papers by Karambelas and Powell look at evidence for the importance of advocacy in the Second Sophistic and the late Roman Empire respectively. In an introduction, the editors discuss recurrent themes connected with the orator’s competence and performance, while the final paper of the volume, by Lord Justice Laws, reflects on the continuing relevance of rhetoric in the modern, highly professionalised practice of the law in England.

Digital Library: Digi20

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[First posted in AWOL 6 June 2011, updated 20 January 201]

Digi20
http://digi20.digitale-sammlungen.de/serializer/Digi20_header.jpg
Das vorliegende Projekt steht im Kontext der Aktionslinie „Digitalisierung der DFG-Sondersammelgebiete“ und konzentriert sich auf die Digitalisierung überwiegend geistes- und sozialwissenschaftlicher, nicht gemeinfreier Literatur mit Schwerpunkt auf monographischen Werken. 

Gegenstand des Projekts sind in einer ersten Phase rd. 4700 Titel aus Programmsegmenten der Verlage Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, Wilhelm Fink / Ferdinand Schöningh sowie Otto Sagner. In einer zweiten Phase werden entlang einer vereinbarten Moving Wall, d.h. einem zeitlichen Abstand zum aktuellen Erscheinungsjahr von drei bis fünf Jahren, sukzessive weitere rd. 1750 Titel bis zum Jahr 2014 digitalisiert. 

Entsprechende Vereinbarungen mit den Verlagen, die ihrerseits im Einvernehmen mit den Autoren handeln, eröffnen die Möglichkeit, die urheberrechtsbehafteten Werke zu digitalisieren und im Open Access entsprechend der Praxisregeln der DFG zur Verfügung zu stellen. 

Der Webauftritt bietet eine Volltextsuche über die gesamte Sammlung oder in einzelnen Fachkollektionen. Sämtliche Titel sind aber auch über den OPAC der Bayerischen Staatsbibliothek zugänglich. Die Einbindung in fachlich einschlägige Virtuelle Fachbibliotheken befindet sich in Vorbereitung.
The present project was developed in the context of the long-term project “Digitalization of the DFG (German Research Society) special subject fields”. It concentrates on the digitalization of literature not in public domain, predominantly in the field of humanities and social sciences with an emphasis on monographs.
In the first phase of the project, approx. 4700 titles of programme segments of the publishers Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, Wilhelm Fink / Ferdinand Schöningh as well as Otto Sagner were digitized. In a second phase, further approx. 1750 titles are being included till 2014 by consecutively digitizing all monographs up to a defined ‘Moving Wall’ of three to five years to the current year of publication.
Corresponding arrangements with publishing houses, who act in agreement with their authors, enable the BSB to digitize works protected by copyright and to provide accessibility according to the guidelines of the DFG via Open Access.
The Website provides a full-text search of the entire collection or of the single subject collections. All titles are also accessible with the OPAC of the Bavarian State Library. The inclusion in professionally relevant virtual subject libraries is in preparation.
 Digi20 has content relating to the ancient word in a variety of subject areas, for example:
Klassische Archäologie

American Travelers in Italy Online

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American Travelers in Italy
http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/ui/custom/default/collection/coll_ItalTravLit/images/banner_italtravlit.jpg
Italian travel literature has been a well-studied and rewarding genre among intellectuals for the past three centuries or more. As a multidisciplinary topic, the theme of Italian travel touches on different traditions and ways of thinking from the history of culture and art to philosophy and religion. This digital collection makes a number of titles available in full-text-searchable format for students, faculty, and others interested in Italian Studies.
The search capabilities enable the user to focus on a given Italian city, region, feature or monument. The collection is accessible even to those with a limited command of Italian, since the texts by American travelers (mostly from the 18th and 19th centuries) are in English. Further accounts of American travelers to Italy can be found here.
The invitation for the Harold B. Lee Library to cooperate with Centro Interuniversitario di Ricerche sul Viaggio in Italia (CIRVI) on this project can be traced, in part, to the natural affinities and relationships developed between Utah, site of the 2002 Winter Olympics, and Turin, home of CIRVI and site of the 2006 Winter Olympics.
 And see AWOL's round-up of Open Access Travel Literature.

Open Access Journal: Bulletin of the Council of University Classical Departments

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[First posted in AWOL 17 April 2013, updated 20 January 2017]

Bulletin of the Council of University Classical Departments
http://www.rhul.ac.uk/classics/cucd/logo.gif
The Council of University Classical Departments is the professional forum for all teachers of classical Greek and Roman subjects in British Universities. It has four meetings annually: three meetings of the Standing Committee, and a plenary Council meeting in November, at which all UK Classics Departments (and remnants thereof) are represented (see the constitution, and "Contacts, Representatives, and Member Institutions" below). As well as serving as a voice for classical teachers in higher education on matters of academic and professional significance, CUCD collects annual statistics on students numbers in UK classical degree programmes, and publishes the CUCD Bulletin, which is available on-line from volume 24 (1995), and continues to appear in hard copy at the time of the annual Council meeting.
Bulletin 45 (2016)
Chair’s Report 2016
Victoria Leonard and Liz Gloyn, Women’s Classical Committee Origin and Visions
Jason Crowley and April Pudsey, Making [Ancient] History at MMU
Ellie Mackin, Gaining HEA Fellowship through teaching recognition
Katerina Volioti, Teaching in London Museums
Victoria Leonard, Irene Salvo et al., Analysis of Findings – The WCC Survey
Tony Keen et al, Roehampton Classical Student Research: A Celebration
Lucy Jackson and Victoria Leonard, Launching the Women’s Classical Committee
So, you’re an outreach officer: what next?
Contents:
SO, YOU’RE AN OUTREACH OFFICER: WHAT NEXT?
Kathryn Tempest
Important Steps
Mai Musié
1: GRANTS AND FUNDING
 1.1 Classical Association Outreach Grant
Claire Davenport
1.2 Classics for All
Hilary Hodgson
1.3 Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies
Evelien Bracke
1.4 Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies
Fiona Haarer
2: CASE STUDIES
 2.1 The Iris Project at the University of Glasgow
Jennifer Hilder
 2.2 AMO, AMAS, AMAT AND ALL THAT… OxLAT: The Oxford Latin Teaching Scheme
Emma Searle
 2.3 Cymru Wales Classics Hub
Evelien Bracke
 2.4 Classics on Film: Ancient World Video Competition
Max Kramer
 NEXT STEPS…
Kathryn Tempest
2015-16-statistics

Bulletin 44 (2015)
Chair’s Report 2015
The Future of Postgraduate Training and Skills Development
CUCD Roundtable, Classical Association Conference, Nottingham 2014
Genevieve Liveley, ‘CA Roundtable Report’
Jennifer Hillder, ‘What postgraduates want’
Shushma Malik, ‘What postgraduates need’
David Carter,‘Could we all be better linguists?’
Fiona McHardy, ‘Training for Postgraduate Students’
Greg Woolf, ‘REF 2014’
Louise Revell, New Ancient History Degrees at Southampton
Theodora Jim, Classics at Lancaster
Helen Lovatt, CUCD Education Committee: A new phase?
Sue Willetts, Obituary of Anastasia Healey
Armand D’Angour, In Memoriam M.L. West
2013-14 statistics
2014-15 statistics

Open Access Journal: Revista Vértices

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Revista Vértices
ISSN: 2179-5894
http://revistas.fflch.usp.br/public/journals/6/homeHeaderTitleImage_pt_BR.jpg
Revista dos Pós-Graduandos da Área de Hebraico do Programa de Pós-Graduação em Estudos Judaicos e Estudos Árabes do Departamento de Letras Orientais da Faculdade de Filosofia, Letras e Ciências Humanas da Universidade de São Paulo.




2010

Egyptian historical thought: the visitors' graffiti of the New Kingdom at Saqqara and Abusir as a case study

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Egyptian historical thought: the visitors' graffiti of the New Kingdom at Saqqara and Abusir as a case study 
Title (in czech): Historické myšlení u starých Egypťanů

Type: Dissertation

Author: PhDr. Hana Navrátilová, Ph.D.
Supervisor: prof. PhDr. Ladislav Bareš, CSc.
Opponents: John Baines
prof. Dr. Antonio Loprieno

Thesis Id: 24642
Faculty: Faculty of Arts (FF)
Department: Czech Institute of Egyptology (21-CEGU)
Study programm: Historical Studies (P7105)
Study branch: Egyptology (XEGY)
Degree granted: Ph.D.
Defence date: 04/10/2006
Defence result: pass

Language: English 

Abstract:
As an Egyptologist and historian I have tried to partner in this dissertation Egyptological and historical methods used on the topic of the uses of the past and on the issue of the presence of uses of the past in the Egyptian culture. There is a large discussion on these enquiries in both disciplines. I have focused on sources originating in the Egyptian New Kingdom (around 1540 to 1080 BC) and tried to analyse some issues related to the social memory and presumed historical awareness of this period. There is a specific material – a group of inscriptions called the “visitors’ inscriptions” (Besucherinschriften). These texts are well-known to Egyptology but in my opinion deserve even more attention, being an attestation to the culture of a period literate stratum – the scribes. The thesis is divided into three major parts: 1/ the uses of the past – theoretical approaches, giving also the reasons for carrying out the analysis of the uses of the past of the ancient cultures, especially Egypt; 2/ the New Kingdom and presumed uses of the past in the Egyptian society of that time; 3/ the visitors’ graffiti, including: * state of research, the graffiti database project; * the description of the graffiti in a statistical overview; * interpretations and conclusions, attempting also to insert the graffiti into the sub-elite culture of the New Kingdom Egypt; * a catalogue of the Abusir and Saqqara graffiti. The visitors’ graffiti are the core of the work. The area chosen is that of Abusir and Saqqara, in the period of 18th dynasty to the Ramesside period, mainly 19th dynasty. The research has taken a period of altogether five years, from 2001 to 2006, and it cannot be considered as concluded. The fascinating world of the education, career, ideas and mentality of the Egyptian scribe1 in the New Kingdom has many expressions and the graffiti are but one of its aspects. Powered by TCPDF (www.tcpdf.org) 

Documents

Download Document Author Type File size
Download Text of the thesis PhDr. Hana Navrátilová, Ph.D.
31.1 MB
Download Abstract in czech PhDr. Hana Navrátilová, Ph.D.
20 kB
Download Abstract in english PhDr. Hana Navrátilová, Ph.D.
151 kB
Download Supervisor's review prof. PhDr. Ladislav Bareš, CSc.
952 kB
Download Opponent's review John Baines
1.96 MB
Download Opponent's review prof. Dr. Antonio Loprieno
797 kB

A Mid-Republican House from Gabii - Database

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A Mid-Republican House From Gabii
Rachel Opitz, Marcello Mogetta, and Nicola Terrenato, Editors
Written and crafted with Tyler Johnson, Antonio F. Ferrandes, Laura Banducci, Francesca Alhaique, Laura Motta, Shannon Ness, Jason Farr, Sam Lash, and Matt Naglak
A Mid Republican House from Gabii
The database portion of this project is free of charge, the publication is behind a paywall.
 A Mid-Republican House from Gabii - Database
The first major publication from the international Gabii Project 

Since 2009 the Gabii Project, an international archaeological initiative led by Nicola Terrenato and the University of Michigan, has been investigating the ancient Latin town of Gabii, which was both a neighbor of, and a rival to, Rome in the first millennium BCE. The trajectory of Gabii, from an Iron Age settlement to a flourishing mid-Republican town to an Imperial agglomeration widely thought to be in decline, provides a new perspective on the dynamics of settlement in central Italy. This publication focuses on the construction, inhabitation, and repurposing of a private home at Gabii, built in the mid-Republican period. The remains of the house provide new information on the architecture and organization of domestic space in this period, adding to a limited corpus of well-dated examples. Importantly, the house's micro-history sheds light on the tensions between private and public development at Gabii as the town grew and reorganized itself in the mid- to late-Republican period transition. Published in digital form as a website backed up by a detailed database, the publication provides a synthesis of the excavation results linked to the relevant spatial, descriptive, and quantitative data.

New Open Access Journal: Forma Urbis International: A technical-scientific journal founded by Luciano PasqualiE.S.S. Editorial Service System Fondazione Dià Cultura

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Forma Urbis International: A technical-scientific journal founded by Luciano PasqualiE.S.S. Editorial Service System Fondazione Dià Cultura 

New frontiers in epigraphy and a host of new technological developments in that field is the topic that opens the first English-language issue of our magazine. Forma Urbis was founded in 1995, with the purpose of sharing knowledge about Rome and the entire ancient world with our readers. We have explored the rediscovery of underground Roman sites and monuments, presented essays on ancient history, on archaeology (from protohistory to the Middle Ages), numismatics, culture and folk traditions, as well as articles about new archaeological discoveries – which we are often the first to describe. 

The journal’s primary aim – especially since its union with the Fondazione Dià Cultura, which has been in charge of its content and art direction since 2012 – is to offer an ideal blend of scientific journal (as is clear from our content, which is always provided by professional archaeologists) and magazine for the general public (as can be seen from our widespread dissemination both on newsstands and online). In other words, ours is a high-quality and authoritative publication, accessible to an audience that comprises even occasional readers. 

This first international issue discusses epigraphy, the science that deals with inscriptions (tituli in Latin). It is a discipline that is difficult to define, a task made even more complicated by epigraphy’s relationship with sciences such as papyrology and numismatics – the studies of documents written on papyrus and of coins, respectively – which circumscribe its area of competence and, occasionally, become ‘entangled’ with it. The word’s literal meaning, from the Greek epigraphein, meaning “to write on”, corresponds perfectly to the Latin inscribere. Epigraphy therefore encompasses all written material handed down to us directly from antiquity as opposed to being passed down through the mediation of Medieval copyists. Inscriptions are a priceless legacy...