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Open Access Journal: Germania: Anzeiger der Römisch-Germanischen Kommission des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts

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Germania: Anzeiger der Römisch-Germanischen Kommission des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts
Die Zeitschrift „Germania. Anzeiger der Römisch-Germanischen Kommission des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts“ wird seit 1917 von der Römisch-Germanischen Kommission zunächst unter dem Titel „Korrespondenzblatt der Römisch-Germanischen Kommission des kaiserlichen Archäologischen Instituts“, dann „… des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts“ herausgegeben. Aktuelle Vorberichte zu Grabungen, Forschungsbeiträge und Studien, Diskussionsbeiträge sowie ein umfangreicher Rezensionsteil prägen die Zeitschrift bis heute.

Die Aufsätze werden in deutscher, englischer und französischer Sprache gedruckt und unterliegen einem Peer Review-Verfahren. Sie decken Themen von der Steinzeit bis ins Mittelalter und von fachgeschichtlichen bis naturwissenschaftlichen Untersuchungen ab.

Zurzeit werden hier die älteren Bände bereitgestellt. Nach Klärung offener Copyrightfragen folgen neuere und aktuelle Bände.

















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Roundup of Resources on Ancient Geography

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[Most recently updated 2 January 2017]

Included in the following list are links to digital project dealing with geography and the ancient world. It is an eclectic list, culled mostly from entries in AWOL. It has no pretentions of being complete or comprehensive, but is offered to give readers a sense of the range of materials currently accessible. I have (for the most part) not included the scores of atlases, maps and other orginally paper-based geographical resources which are accessible online in facsimile.

I welcome comments, suggestions for sites to include, notices of projects under development, and any other sorts of reactions you may have.  Please use the comment function below, or email me directly.  I'm easy to find.



2300 Ancient Sites on Google Earth 
On several occasions I have blogged on the possibilities of Google Earth and its online spin-off, Google Maps. My last blog on this topic was a bit over half a year ago, when I had some 1700 items available. In the meantime, I have added more than 550 ancient sites to my list, from all quarters of the ancient world.
Ancient Mediterranean Ports
The Union of Ancient Mediterranean Ports was created in 1995 from a network of cities with the common characteristic of having been founded during Greek antiquity. The union was enacted in 1996 with its headquarters in the ancient town of Agatha, current Aged of Southern France...
Ancient Locations:Database of Archaeological Sites
ANCIENT LOCATIONS is my collection of Placemarks of archaeologically interesting locations of the ancient world.
The list is continuously updated and expanded to give anyone with an interest in archaeology and history the possibility to look up the coordinates of relevant sites.
Locations are included if they existed prior to 476 CE in the Old World (end of the West-Roman Empire) and prior to 1492 CE in the New World (re-discovery of the New World).

Ancient Ports – Ports Antiques

Le Projet d’inventaire des Ports Antiques

This web site presents work done to collect, identify and locate ancient harbours and ports. It is based on a study of existing documentation and does not aim at finding new ports that were unknown at the time of writing. The result is a list of around 2750 ancient ports based on 66 ancient authors and a few modern authors. 
Ancient World Mapping Center
Recently the Center has been able to acquire its own server, so this is the ideal opportunity to revise and upgrade the website now launched here. The new site provides a robust platform to host the Center’s activities, especially its online initiatives Antiquity À-la-carte and the newly conceived Benthos project. Please explore and enjoy. You are encouraged to join the AWMC community and participate by registering yourself as a user of the site. The Center can only function with much valued support from donors. If you too would like to make a contribution, please visit the Support AWMC page.
ANE Placemarks for Google Earth
From Olof Pedersén
A preliminary set of placemarks (ANE.kmz) for Google Earth of a selection of the most important archaeological sites in the Ancient Near East can be downloaded here (as an alternative try right-click or ctrl-click).
Antiquity À-la-carte
The Antiquity À-la-carte application is an interactive digital map of the ancient world.
APAAME: Aerial Photography Archive for Archaeology in the Middle East
APAAME is long-term research project directed by Professor David Kennedy and Dr Robert Bewley, and is based at the University of Western Australia. The project is designed both to develop a methodology suited to the region and to illuminate settlement history in the Near East. The archive currently consists of almost 45,000 aerial images, over 40,000 of which are displayed on the archive’s Flickr site.

Although principally focused on Jordan, in which there has been an annual programme of flying since 1997 (The Aerial Archaeology in Jordan Project), high resolution satellite imagery on Google Earth is now permitting research on neighbouring countries.

We will be keeping you up to date on what we are finding, how we are finding it, and also taking you with us on our fieldwork in Jordan.
ArchéoGéographie
Le site de l'archéogéographie est une réalisation du Groupe de Recherches du CNRS intitulé "Traité de l'ESpace des Sociétés Rurales Anciennes" (= GDR 2137, TESORA). Ce groupe, dont l'existence institutionnelle prend fin en 2007 après 8 années d'existence, a conçu et formalisé une discipline nouvelle nommée archéogéographie et rédigé le Traité d'archéogéographie qui lui sert de base (en cours de parution). 

L'archéogéographie est enseignée à l'Université de Paris-I Sorbonne dans le cadre d'un Master “archéologie et environnement”, dont elle constitue une des quatre options. Les cours d'archéogéographie sont donnés par Gérard Chouquer, Magali Wateaux, Sandrine Robert. La direction de thèses sur des thèmes d'archéogéographie est assurée par Gérard Chouquer dans le cadre d'un Doctorat d'archéologie de l’École Doctorale d’Archéologie de l’Université de Paris I (ED 112). Certaines thèses sont encadrées en co-direction avec Joëlle Burnouf.


À partir de l'année universitaire 2007-2008, l'archéogéographie est enseignée à Coimbra, dans le cadre d'un Master "Archéologie et territoires", Spécialisation Archéogéographie, et, à partir de 2008/2009 dans le cadre d'un Doctorat d'archéogéographie. L'encadrement des thèses du doctorat d'archéogéographie sera assurée par Maria da Conceição Lopes.
Le responsable du site internet de l'archéogéographie est Gérard Chouquer, directeur de recherches au CNRS dans l'équipe Arscan ("Archéologie et Sciences de l'Antiquité" UMR 7041 du CNRS) et la sous-équipe "Archéologies environnementales" que dirige Joëlle Burnouf.
Archaeological Survey of Israel - English - Hebrew
The sites documented in the Archaeological Survey of Israel are published on the website where they are displayed in survey squares of 100 sq km (10 × 10 km). The list of maps is presented below in alphabetic order, according to their names and numbers as recorded in Yalquṭ Ha-Pirsumim. The survey maps can be seen on the right side of the screen against the background of an aerial photograph. The sites (marked with yellow dots) can be accessed by zooming in on the screen and a description of them will appear by clicking on the dots. The introduction to each map and search options are also displayed.
ArchAtlas
ArchAtlas is a web-orientated archaeological mapping and research project, founded by the late Prof. Andrew Sherratt, which continues to be developed at the Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield, UK.

Археологическая карта Крыма 
Археологические экспедиции, регулярно работающие в Крыму.
История Крыма открывается нам во многом благодаря археологическим раскопкам. В приводимом ниже списке и на карте указаны экспедиции, в течение многих лет проводящие археологические исследования в Крыму на ряде крупных памятников. В некоторые из экспедиций можно поехать волонтером. Волонтерам, как правило, приходится оплачивать свое пребывание. Более подробную информацию Вы можете найти на сайтах экспедиций, если таковые есть и функционируют, либо, установив контакты с прошлыми участниками или руководством. Многие, побывавшие в экспедициях, и дальше именно так предпочитают проводить отдых в Крыму и история Крыма, открываемая археологией, становится частью их жизни. Подчеркну, что экспедиций, конечно, гораздо больше, но многие носят кратковременный характер, и часто их задачей являются раскопки отдельного объекта. В этом случае, как правило, экспедиции немногочисленны, раскопки выполняются профессиональными археологами с привлечение небольшого числа опытных рабочих.
Archmap: Mapping Mesopotamian Monument
Welcome to Mapping Mesopotamian Monuments.  
Mapping Mesopotamian Monuments presents a topographical survey of the standing historical and architectural remains in the region from Kurdistan to southern Iraq. A work in progress, this monument survey covers all historical periods from ancient to modern. It includes ancient Mesopotamian rock reliefs carved into the cliff faces of the mountains, early Christian churches and monasteries, early Islamic, Ottoman and twentieth century architecture. The database of images invites you to explore the multiple layers of the rich historical landscape of Mesopotamia. Envisioned and directed by Professor Zainab Bahrani, the basis of the survey is a field project that assesses the condition of monuments, maps their locations, and records them with digital techniques to provide a record and to facilitate future preservation and conservation work across this land. In the first season (2013) the team documented the major monuments and historical architecture of the Dohuk region and the city of Erbil, one of the oldest continuously inhabited sites in the world.

Atlas archéologique de la Tunisie
Babelon, Ernest. Atlas archéologique de la Tunisie : édition spéciale des cartes topographiques publiées par le M inistère de la Guerre. accompagnée d'un texte explicatif rédigé par Mm. E. Babelon, R. Cagnat, S. Reinach. [Texte] / . Paris 1893.
Atlas archéologique de l'Algérie
Gsell, Stéphane. 1864-1932: Atlas archéologique de l'Algérie : édition spéciale des cartes au 200.000e du Service Géographique de l'Armée / avec un texte explicatif rédigé par Stéphane Gsell. Texte. . Alger : Paris 1911.
Atlas des Sites du PRoche-Orient (ASPRO)
L’ Atlas des Sites du Proche-Orient (ASPRO) se présente comme un répertoire analytique de près de 2 000 sites occupés entre 14 000 et 5 700 BP (environ 14 000 - 4 500 av. J.-C.) sur un territoire qui s’étend du Sinaï au Turkménistan et de l’Anatolie au golfe Arabo-Persique.
Atlas of Old Iranian Inscriptions

Atlas PALM: Atlas du Patrimoine Archéologique Littorale Méditerranéen

Le projet

pointillés
Né de la volonté de mettre à disposition de tous une part méconnue du patrimoine culturel, l’Atlas PALM propose de mettre en ligne et en lumière 60 années de découvertes et de recherches archéologiques sous-marines sur les côtes de la région Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur.

Si la pratique de l'archéologie sous-marine est relativement récente, l'exploration des fonds méditerranéens français a néanmoins généré au cours des soixante dernières années une documentation riche, abondante et variée. La diversité de ce patrimoine archéologique illustre, sur plusieurs millénaires, l'histoire des régions littorales françaises et leur rôle d'interface entre monde méditerranéen et continent européen. A l'inverse du patrimoine terrestre, ces vestiges, pourtant témoins et acteurs de l'identité méditerranéenne, sont souvent invisibles ou inaccessibles, immergés, fragiles, en proie aux pillages et aux destructions.

Atlas Préhistorique de la Tunisie 
at the Institut National du Patrimoine, Tunisie
 Two additional fascicles are available at the digital library of theÉcole Française de Rome
Atlas préhistorique de la Tunisie. 1. Tabarka. 1985.
Atlas préhistorique de la Tunisie. 2. Bizerte. 1985. 

The Archaeological Sites of the Aegean Minoans
The Aegean Minoan 3D GIS Project was initiated in 2007 to produce a three-dimensional (3D) full-color mapping of the archaeological sites of the Minoans in the Aegean Sea area using Google Earth. It is intended to be a definitive geographical reference available to everyone. While this is an ongoing project and we are always looking to improve it, thanks to the many contributing scholars and volunteers it is by far the most comprehensive and accurate mapping of its kind ever made and includes the sites and geographical features listed below.
Benthos: Digital Atlas of Ancient Waters beta version
Benthos is a new initiative of the Ancient World Mapping Center that aims to catalog and map the waters of the ancient Mediterranean basin, including both physical and cultural geography. The project will provide interactive maps of Mediterranean shipping networks, bathymetric data, and views of ancient coastlines. Currently the project is in a preliminary state, with a functional beta version of the application based off of Antiquity À-la-carte.
Click here ... in order to launch the map application. This application works best with FirefoxChrome, or Safari and currently does not work correctly with Internet Explorer.
The Big Ancient Mediterranean
BAM was developed at the University of Iowa by Paul Dilley (University of Iowa), Sarah E. Bond (University of Iowa), and Ryan Horne (UNC-Chapel Hill). The open-access project integrates GIS tools, network analysis, and textual annotation/data mining capabilities in order to allow the exploration and visualization of ancient texts in new ways. The first individual module within Big Ancient Mediterranean is called Terra Biblica. Terra Biblica is a tool for the geospatial analysis, literary network visualization, and plot mapping of biblical and related texts up to the year 337 CE. BAM also houses the Iowa Canon of Latin Authors. The Iowa Canon of Latin Authors and Works is a catalogue and information repository for all extant Latin authors and their writings, including fragmentary texts, as well as translations into Latin, from the earliest period through the seventh century CE.
Carta Archeologica di Roma

On-line la Carta Archeologica di Roma

E' consultabile sulla piattaforma web il lavoro preparatorio della Carta Archeologica di Roma, conservato nel patrimonio documentario dell'Archivio Storico a Palazzo Altemps, edito sotto forma di ebook a cura di Luigia Attilia.
La carte nationale des sites archéologiques et des monuments historiques : feuilles 1/50 000
Responsable Scientifique et Administratif : Mustapha KHANOUSSI
Responsable NTIC : Ali DABBAGHI

1. Nature: Projet présidentiel
2. Références 
- décision du Conseil Ministériel Restreint sous la présidence de son Excellence le Président de la République du 21 Juillet 1991.
- décret n°1443-1992 du 03 août 1992
. Cadre général
Malgré la diversité des projets d'inventaire dès la fin du XIX ème siècle, il n'y a pas encore un inventaire général et exhaustif des sites archéologiques, des monuments historiques et du patrimoine vernaculaire.
4. Contenu
La carte nationale des sites archéologiques et des monuments historiques a vu ses objectifs clairement précisés par le décret n°1443-1992 daté du 3 août 1992 :
Article premier.– Il est institué une carte nationale des sites archéologiques et des monuments historiques en terre et en mer dans le but d’établir l’inventaire général des lieux et édifices qui constituent une partie du patrimoine culturel national.
Article 2.– Pour le recensement des sites et des monuments, il sera procédé à l’établissement et à l’impression des documents suivants :
- carte au 1/50 000e comportant la localisation des sites
- plan au 1/2000 comportant la localisation des monuments et des tissus urbains traditionnels.
- fichier comportant une description des sites et des monuments, une évaluation des superficies, une couverture photographique et, dans la mesure du possible, une enquête foncière préliminaire. »

CHARDA-Xplore

We are happy about your interest at CHARDA-Xplore. In the following you will get some short information about the project.

The Chinese Archaeology Database (CHARDA-Xplore) began as part of the research project 'Chinese Metal' (CHIME), located in the research-cluster 2 of the DAI, and was originally designed to collect and document the available information on early Chinese metal finds.

CHARDA-Xplore basically serves as a collection of standardized and geo-referenced archaeological information, providing the possibility to analyze these data statistically and to map spatial and temporal distribution patterns.
China Historical GIS 
The China Historical Geographic Information System, CHGIS, project was launched in January 2001 to establish a database of populated places and historical administrative units for the period of Chinese history between 221 BCE and 1911 CE. CHGIS provides a base GIS platform for researchers to use in spatial analysis, temporal statistical modeling, and representation of selected historical units as digital maps.
CORONA Atlas of the Middle East BETA

CORONA is the codename for the United States’ first photographic spy satellite mission, in operation from 1960-1972. During that time, CORONA satellites took high-resolution images of most of the earth’s surface, with particular emphasis on Soviet bloc countries and other political hotspots in order to monitor military sites and produce maps for the Department of Defense. The more than 800,000 images collected by the CORONA missions remained classified until 1995 when an executive order by President Bill Clinton made them publicly available through the US Geological Survey. Because CORONA images preserve a high-resolution picture of the world as it existed in the 1960s, they constitute a unique resource for researchers and scientists studying environmental change, agriculture, geomorphology, archaeology and other field.
Descriptio Romae
L'immagine che gli studiosi hanno di Roma è quella del luogo, per eccellenza, depositario di valori artistico-architettonici di primaria importanza, meta di ogni viaggio (reale o intellettuale) che a quei valori voglia attingere. Paradossalmente la conoscenza della città è resa problematica proprio in ragione della straordinaria estensione del suo patrimonio e della altrettanto vasta - e non coordinata - diffusione delle relative fonti documentarie.

Digital Atlas of Roman and Medieval Civilization (DARMC)

The Digital Atlas of Roman and Medieval Civilization(DARMC) makes freely available on the internet the best available materials for a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) approach to mapping and spatial analysis of the Roman and medieval worlds. DARMC allows innovative spatial and temporal analyses of all aspects of the civilizations of western Eurasia in the first 1500 years of our era, as well as the generation of original maps illustrating differing aspects of ancient and medieval civilization. A work in progress with no claim to definitiveness, it has been built in less than three years by a dedicated team of Harvard undergraduates, graduate students, research scholars and one professor, with some valuable contributions from younger and more senior scholars at other institutions. For more details on who we are, please see the People page...
Digital Atlas of the Roman Empire
Johan Åhlfeldt, Lund, Sweden.
The Digital Archaeological Atlas of the Holy Land
The Digital Archaeological Atlas of the Holy Land (DAAHL) is an international project that brings together experts in information technology including Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and the archaeology of the Holy Land (modern Israel, Palestine, Jordan, southern Lebanon, Syria and the Sinai Peninsula) to create the first on-line digital atlas of the region held sacred to the three great monotheistic faiths - Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Using the power of spatial information systems such as Google Maps and Google Earth, GIS, the tens of thousands of recorded archaeological sites for the region - from the remote prehistoric periods to the early 20th century - will be entered into a comprehensive database along with site maps, photographs and artifacts. The historical and archaeological content for this project will be developed by a team of over 30 international scholars working in the region, helping to provide the data used to create the Atlas. This website and its content will serve as the prototype "knowledge node" of a more comprehensive Digital Archaeological Atlas Network for the Mediterranean region.
Digital Augustan Rome

Digital Augustan Rome is a long term mapping project that is prepared to provide a worthy digital successor to the published book and maps of Mapping Augustan Rome that appeared as Supplement 50 in the Journal of Roman Archaeology Series, 2002. The volume was directed by Lothar Haselberger in collaboration with David Gilman Romano and edited by Elisha Dumser. The entries were written by over 12 authors.  
The Digital Gazetteer of the Song Dynasty
A digital history project at the University of California, Merced
In 1958, Sinologist Hope Wright published a work entitled An Alphabetical List of Geographical Names in Sung China. Originally published in Paris by the Centre de Recherches Historiques of the École Pratique des Hautes Études, and reprinted as a second-generation photocopy in 1992 by the Journal of Song-Yuan Studies, the Alphabetical List is now out of print.

Wright’s compilation is the most comprehensive print source for Song geography in any language. The Digital Gazetteer of Song Dynasty China (DGSD) is a MySQL database derived primarily from the Alphabetical List.
A digital map of the Roman Empire

The project is described in this article. The digital map has been created by Johan Åhlfeldt with support from the Pelagios project.
Digitale Topographie der Stadt Rom
Chrystina Häuber
Die Klassische Archäologin Dr. Chrystina Häuber (jetzt Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität [LMU] München, Department für Geographie) und der Geograph und Programmierer Dr. Franz Xaver Schütz (Hochschule München, Fakultät für Geoinformation und FORTVNA Research Center for Archaeological Information Systems Regensburg) haben die Forschungsprojekte "FORTVNA" (1994-2001) und "The Eastern Part of the Mons Oppius in Rome" (2001-2003) gemeinsam durchgeführt. Im Forschungsprojekt "FORTVNA" haben sie das gleichnamige objektorientierte Informationssystem zur Erforschung der Topographie des antiken Rom entwickelt, während das Forschungsprojekt "The Eastern Part of the Mons Oppius in Rome" nach dem Untersuchungsgebiet auf dem Esquilin in Rom benannt war, an dem sie das Informationssystem "FORTVNA" erprobt haben. Um die erzielten Resultate in Karten umzusetzen, begannen sie 2003 mit dem laufenden Forschungsprojekt "AIS ROMA"...

 Egyptian Antiquities Information System Newsletter

Egyptian Antiquities Information System is the official Geographic Information System (GIS) department of the Supreme Council of Antiquities (SCA), the government institution responsible for protecting Egyptian archaeological sites. EAIS collaborates with a large number of national and international stakeholders to develop Cultural Resource Management in Egypt and facilitate site management and protection.
EurAtlas: History and Geography of Europe
Euratlas is a website dedicated mainly to the historical geography of Europe but it offers also a world atlas and a wide collection of pictures in order to give a comprehensive view of history and geography.

Our continent is presented here as a wide cultural area limited north by degree 60, east by the Ural - Caspian - Zagros line, south by the Sahara and west by the Atlantic Ocean...
 FastiOnline: A database of archaeological excavations since the year 2000
Between 1946 and 1987 the International Association for Classical Archaeology (AIAC) published the Fasti Archaeologici. It contained very useful summary notices of excavations throughout the area of the Roman Empire. However, spiraling costs and publication delays combined to render it less and less useful. AIACs board of directors thus decided in 1998 to discontinue the publication and to seek a new way of recording and diffusing new results. The Fasti Online is the result of this effort.
GapVisBETA

Overview 

GapVis is an interface for exploring and reading texts that reference ancient places. It includes maps and data visualizations that show what locations are referred to a different points in the narrative and allows you to dig into the details to learn more.
Geodia
GeoDia (jee-oh-DEE-uh, short for "geodiachronicity") is intended to provide a simple, intuitive way for people to visualize the temporal, geographic, and material aspects of ancient Mediterranean civilizations. Enter GeoDia >>
GIS Center Newsletter
Egyptian Minister of State for Antiquities (MSA), Geographic Information System Center

The GIS Center was founded to improve SCA's ability to protect and manage archaeological sites. This goal was achieved by creating a system for identification of the location and characteristics of archaeological sites and to record them in a searchable GIS and database. The information is then transferred to targeted stakeholders, which enables them to take the existence and significance of these sites into consideration in all conservation, land management and planning, and related socio-economic activities...
 GIS in Archaeology: The Complete Guide

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are tools for the input, analysis and output of spatial data. Geographers initially used these tools for resource management purposes (Burrough 1986). Over the last decade, GIS applications have revolutionized many disciplines in many ways (Marble, 1990), though some disciplines adopted them earlier than others. In the field of archeology, GIS has barely reached the end of the experimental stage. Although it was used fairly regularly in the early 1980?s, (Kvamme, 1996) its present utilization has dramatically increased. At the time this paper was written, over 500 archaeologists worldwide were registered GIS users with the online database "GIS-using archaeologists", developed byPaul Miller and Ian Johnson in 1995. It is suspected that the actual number of GIS users in the archaeology circle is substantially higher.
Google Ancient Places
The Web is seeing an explosion of digitized material being made freely and openly available online. Google Books alone has some 12 million books in over 300 languages; but other collections, such as the Open Library and the Hathi Trust, are also making accessible texts, many of which were previously available only in prestigious university libraries. But the challenge is: What’s there? And how can it be used?

With funding from Google’s Digital Humanities Research Awards, the Google Ancient Places (GAP) project addresses these two primary concerns of discovery and usability using ancient world places as the target information that we want to able to find and visualize. We call this automated process the ‘there and back again’ principle: it’s not enough to empower users to discover ancient places in large text corpora; we also allow users to move back again to find the books that refer to them.
Heritage Gazetteer of Cyprus
Welcome to the Heritage Gazetteer for Cyprus (HGC). Cyprus has played an important role in the history of many cultures. It has been described in many languages and several different alphabets, over several millennia. This can make identification of places difficult; and it means that interesting historical information may be dispersed, and hard to access.

The overall aim of this project, therefore, is to facilitate the use of a wide range of expertise in recording the historic geography of Cyprus; the resource has been designed to record all locations/monuments attested as in use in any period up to 1882, and all names used for these locations on the island, in any language or period up to the establishment of standard reference systems. Modern administrative districts are named according to the Οδηγός Τυποποίησης Ονομάτων (Nicosia, 2007, available online). Modern toponyms are given in the form used in the Complete Gazetteer of Cyprus (Nicosia, 1987, pp 1-1301 available online: see also the list of Towns and Villages of Cyprus, pp. 1303-1669).
Heritage Gazetteer of Libya
The Heritage Gazetteer of Libya is designed to provide a tool for exploring the rich historic heritage of Libya, based on the work of members of the Society for Libyan Studies. The core data are drawn from the publications of the Society, including two guidebooks to Tripolitania (2009) and Cyrenaica (2013) by Philip Kenrick; further information is being added from the Archives of the Society, and from other publications by members.
Hestia
Hestia uses a range of digital technologies as part of a blended, innovative approach to studying the geography of Herodotus’s Histories. Using a freely available digital text of Herodotus from the Perseus on-line library, Hestia captures all place-names mentioned in the narrative, organises that information in a database, and then explores those spatial relations through a series of mapping applications, such as GIS, GoogleEarth and the Narrative TimeMap. Our work both challenges the usual division between East and West by bringing to light the deep network culture that underpins the Histories, and finds ways of bringing Herodotus's world into people's homes. 
Holy Land Maps from the Eran Laor Cartographic Collection
The Holy Land has been the subject of a relatively large number of maps, chiefly due to its religious importance. Some of the earliest maps reflected ancient traditions of mapping such as that of Ptolemy; others were meant to illustrate the Holy Scriptures. Some maps were printed separately; while others were published as part of atlases, itineraries and travel books. Owners who could afford the expense added coloring to their maps.
The Interactive Nolli Map
The Nolli Web Site presents the 1748 Nolli map of Rome as a dynamic, interactive, hands-on tool. The public now has access to cataloged information about the map in both written and graphical form. The map not only provides rich information, but it has the ability to be updated with new data over time to embrace expanding knowledge.
Irancarto
Irancarto est un site de recherche consacré aux études cartographiques sur l’Iran et le monde iranien actuel ou passé : société, démographie, économie, politique, culture, histoire, linguistique, arts, villes, campagnes...
kmz files from Knowledge and Power in the Neo-Assyrian Empire
Knowledge and Power in the Neo-Assyrian Empire includes a collection of teaching resources.  Among these are:
MAGIS: Mediterranean Archaeology GIS 
Welcome to MAGIS, an inventory of regional survey projects in the greater Mediterranean region
Mapping the Ancient Jewish Diaspora: 117-650 ce
מיפוי התפוצה היהודית בשלהי העת העתיקה 117-650 לס' 
This project aim to construct an interactive website that will map the Jewish Diaspora in the late antiquity.

 The terminus a quo for the proposed research is the Diaspora uprisings against Trajan (115–117) and the ensuing shifts in Jewish life, one of which was the harsh blows experienced by some of the major centers of Jewish settlement in the Diaspora, first and foremost, the Jews of Alexandria and its environs, and the Jews of Cyrenaica and Cyprus.
 
Maps of the Ottoman Empire
The W. F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research (AIAR) in Jerusalem in cooperation with the Center for Ancient Middle Eastern Landscapes (CAMEL) at the University of Chicago scanned and geo-referenced a series of topographical maps of Eastern Turkey and the lands of the broader Ottoman Empire with a grant from the US Department of Education TICFIA program. The bulk of the collection contains topographical maps compiled at the British Intelligence Division War Office in 1915 derived from map and survey data collected during multiple expeditions 1839-1906. The collection contains high resolution copies of the original maps held by AIAR, and geo-referenced versions can be requested by contacting dlir@caorc.org.
Maps: Syria 1:50.000 Series K 723, Ed 1 DMA/AMS Washington DC.
Digitized at Arachne, the central Object database of the German Archaeological Institute (DAI) and the Archaeological Institute of the University of Cologne, administrated by Reinhard Foertsch.
Mapping the Jewish Communities of the Byzantine Empire
The aim of the project is to map the Jewish presence in the Byzantine empire using GIS (Geographical Information Systems).

All information (published and unpublished) about the Jewish communities will be gathered and collated.

The data will be incorporated in a GIS which will be made freely available to the general public on the world-wide-web.

The Mediterranean Archaeological Network (MedArchNet)
Our vision for MedArchNet (The Mediterranean Archaeological Network) is to develop an international network of archaeological sites, from remote prehistory to the early 20th century that provides a model for world cultural heritage research, management, and presentation.  MedArchNet is a virtual organization (VO), which will be built initially in small, incremental steps by incorporating a few thematic nodes and requesting VO members to make modest contributions of data.  This prototype represents a shared vision of what MedArchNet can become--a network of archaeological site data spanning the Mediterranean basin that will empower archaeologists, historians, cultural resource managers and the public with tools to conduct cross-regional studies in ways that have never before been possible, while providing methods for monitoring site conditions and planning for infrastructure development that minimizes adverse effects on archaeological sites.
MEGA-Jordan:  The National Heritage Documentation and Management System

A State-of-the-Art System for Jordan’s Archaeological Sites

MEGA-Jordan is a purpose-built geographic information system (GIS) to inventory and manage archaeology sites at a national level. It has been developed using state-of-the-art technology and requires no more than basic computer skills to enter site and site element boundaries and buffer zones; site details such as condition, threats, and other monitoring updates; and to print out detailed, up-to-date reports on Jordan’s vast number of archaeological sites. The system, in both Arabic and English, is web-based and will standardize and centralize data throughout the Kingdom.
Mapping Mediterranean Lands (MEDMAPS)
Mapping Mediterranean Lands (MEDMAPS) showcases sixteen important early maps and related information from the collections of American centers for international research in the Mediterranean region. As part of the Digital Library for International Research, under the aegis of the Council of American Overseas Research Centers, this three-year project completed a comprehensive survey of maps in the collections of American research centers in the Mediterranean area and created web-accessible bibliographic records. In addition, this site includes information about unique maps and illustrated plates in atlases and other publications relating to archaeological excavation and exploration.

Mapping Mediterranean Lands is funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of State, Education and Cultural Affairs (ECA), 2002-2005. The three-year survey was conducted by the project's Head Cartographer, Leonora Navari, in cooperation with the American centers for international research. Ms. Navari also wrote the exhibition essays and other project notes. 
The Via Appia, ‘Queen of Roads’, became a hallmark of the political and cultural presentation of the city of Rome as the centre of the then existing world, and is still seen as an iconic monument of ancient Rome. Since 2009 the department of Classical Archaeology of the Radboud University Nijmegen has started a field work project in close collaboration with the Royal Netherlands Institute in Rome, named ‘Mapping the Via Appia’. The project aims at a thorough inventory and analysis of the Roman interventions in their suburban landscape, focusing on parts of the 5th and 6th mile of the road. The stretch starts where the modern Via di Erode Attico crosses the Via Appia antica and ends at the point where the Via di Casal Rotondo crosses the ancient road. Other partners are the Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences and the SPINlab of the VU University Amsterdam, and the Soprintendenza Speciale per I Beni Archeologici di Roma.

Moldovan Family Holy Land Map Collection
The Moldovan family Holy Land Map Collection was built over several decades by Dr. Alfred Moldovan and his family. It consists of 94 discrete maps dating from 1480-1797, printed in 23 distinct locations across Europe. The majority of the maps were printed in the 17th and 18th centuries in Amsterdam, Antwerp, Basel, Lyon, Paris, Rome, Strassburg, Tuebingen, and Venice. There are over fifty cartographers and engravers represented, including Adrichem, Bunting, Calmet, Hole, Mercator, Munster, Ortelius, Visscher, Wit, and Ziegler. It also features the unique surviving copy of Antonio De Angelis’s map of Jerusalem, printed in Rome in 1578. The map, the first view of Jerusalem based on direct observation and a key source for subsequent Holy Land cartography, was discovered by Dr. Moldovan and subsequently published in a study by him in 1983 in an article entitled “The Lost De Angelis Map of Jerusalem, 1578" in The Map Collector vol. 24 (1983), 17-25,
http://www.artwis.com/articles/the-lost-de-angelis-map-of-jerusalem-1578/ )
Monuments of the Hittites
Monuments of the Hittites is an experimental site prepared totally as a hobby. My aim is to build a page with references to all major Hittite monuments. The locations listed below are the sites that has one or more monument belonging to the times of Hittite civilization. The text list below divides the sites in to two groups by date. This is definetely not a complete list, nor the listed sites may have complete information. Some pages are still missing information or images. I will continue to update the pages with more information. I would appreciate any comments, feedback, and information. -Tayfun Bilgin
New Online Repository of Maps and Geospatial Data for the Middle East
December 13, 2016
The Center for Ancient Middle Eastern Landscapes (CAMEL Lab) at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago would like to announce that a substantial subset of its digital holdings of maps and geospatial data are now available for online public search and download.
Thanks to the funding of a 2014-2016 IMLS grant, geo-referenced versions of historical and modern maps and satellite imagery have been included in the Oriental Institute’s ever-expanding Integrated Database, available on the Search Our Collections webpage. To access maps and geospatial data specifically, choose “CAMEL” from the first drop-down list.
Old Maps Online: Discovering the Cartography of the Past 
The OldMapsOnline Portal is an easy-to-use gateway to historical maps in libraries around the world.
OmnesViae: Roman Routeplanner: a reconstruction of an antique Roman map with internet technology
OmnesViae.org is an initiative by René Voorburg. It is born out of a fascination for the culture of the ancient Romans. OmnesViae wouldn't have been possible without Richard Talbert's research work on the Tabula Peutingeriana.
Between March and September 2011, I've spent hundreds of hours of scarce spare time creating OmnesViae. Therefor I would like to thank my wife Mariet above all for her patience with my obsessive zeal.
OmnesViae is not just the work of one person. The website http://www.tabula-peutingeriana.de/ by Martin Weber proved to be a useful reference and a handy source for current day place names. The geolocations in OmnesViae are for a large part obtained from the Pleiades initiative. Many people gave me feedback or helped me with translations. I particularly would like to thank Maria Tzaneti, Marlene Sturm, Tim Koster, Martin Weber, Hans de Bode, Ben Mugnier, Eric Rulier, Wouter Kool, Aad Oliehoek and Claude Chauviere.

British Mandate: A Survey of Palestine, prepared by the British Mandate for UN prior to proposing the 1947 partition plan
This is the official books produced by Government of Palestinian (British Mandate) for the years of 1944-1945 which was prepared by the British Mandate for the United Nation Special Committee on Palestine (UNSCOP) in 1946. These three volumes contain a wealth of information about Palestine until the end of 1946...
On-line Geographical Information System for the Theban Necropolis (OLGIS-TN)
The Theban Necropolis Geological Mapping Project of the University of Charleston and the Serapis Research Institute announces the creation of the On-line Geographical Information System for the Theban Necropolis (OLGIS-TN), a pilot project sponsored, in part, by the College of Charleston Santee-Cooper Geographic Information Systems Laboratory. It functions as an Internet clearing house to which scholars of the Theban necropolis can retrieve and contribute relevant data related to the cemeteries of ancient Thebes (located on the West Bank of modern Luxor, Egypt).
Orbis Latinus Online (OLO) beta
Orbis Latinus Online (OLO) is based on the three-part print publication of Orbus Latinus from 1972.
This online resource allows you to find the modern equivalent of latin place names, as well as the latin names of modern places. "Modern" is relative, because the geographical descriptors may date back to the original time of writing. More information on this may be found in the editorial notice of the digitised version of Orbus Latinus at the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek in Munich.

ORBIS: The Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World
ORBIS: The Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World reconstructs the time cost and financial expense associated with a wide range of different types of travel in antiquity. The model is based on a simplified version of the giant network of cities, roads, rivers and sea lanes that framed movement across the Roman Empire. It broadly reflects conditions around 200 CE but also covers a few sites and roads created in late antiquity.

The model consists of 751 sites, most of them urban settlements but also including important promontories and mountain passes, and covers close to 10 million square kilometers (~4 million square miles) of terrestrial and maritime space. 268 sites serve as sea ports. The road network encompasses 84,631 kilometers (52,587 miles) of road or desert tracks, complemented by 28,272 kilometers (17,567 miles) of navigable rivers and canals.
PADIS:  Palestine Archaeological Databank and Information System

A tool for protection, study and valorization of the Archaeological Heritage of Palestine

  • A coherent organization of archaeological and topographical data from Palestine.
  • An interactive databank created to prompt the safeguard of archaeological and historical sites and as scientific and practical tool for the protection, study and cultural valorization.
  • A database including satellite images, aerial photos, excavation photos, topographic maps, and updated bibliographic references, expandable with the cooperation of Palestinian scholars and institutions.
Pelagios: Enable Linked Ancient Geodata In Open Systems
PELAGIOS stands for 'Pelagios: Enable Linked Ancient Geodata In Open Systems' - its aim is to help introduce Linked Open Data goodness into online resources that refer to places in the Ancient World. Why do we want to do that? Well, we think it will make all sorts of other things possible, including new modes of discovery and visualization for scholars and the general publicPelagios also means 'of the sea', the superhighway of the ancient world - a metaphor we consider appropriate for a digital resource that will connect references to ancient places.
Pleiades
Springing from the Classical Atlas Project and the Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World, Pleiades is a historical gazetteer and more. It associates names and locations in time and provides structured information about the quality and provenance of these entities. There is also a graph in Pleiades: names and locations are collected within places and these collections are associated with other geographically connected places. Pleiades also serves as a vocabulary for talking about the geography of the ancient world within Linked Data sets and is referenced by research projects such as Google Ancient Places and PELAGIOS.
Pompeii Bibliography and Mapping Project
The Pompeii Bibliography and Mapping Project is working to create a unique resource that binds two resources in a responsive online user interface. The first component is an exhaustive database of citations and full-text repository relating to the ancient city of Pompeii.  The second component is a Geographical Information System (GIS) map of that ancient city.  Both of these components are available in their beta formats. The online interface planned will allow a user to navigate the bibliographic database and repository via the GIS map or, conversely, to illustrate places in the GIS map found in a search of the database or repository. These components are described in greater detail in the following sections.

POTSHERD : Atlas of Roman Pottery

This is a collection of pages on pottery and ceramics in archaeology, principally of the Roman period (1st cent. BC - 5th cent. AD) in Britain and western Europe.
  • The pages include an introductory Atlas of Roman Pottery, containing descriptions and distribution maps of types of Roman pottery (particularly types found in Britain).
  • The pages of the Atlas describing the individual wares can be accessed through the main menu, which lists the wares by CLASS (table wares, cooking wares, transport amphoras etc) or SOURCE (by province of origin). Links to these indices will also be found in the main menu bar.
Proxeny Networks of the Ancient World  (a database of proxeny networks of the Greek city-states)

About

PNAW is a database of evidence for a particular kind of social networking between Greek city-states in the Ancient Greek world, known as proxeny (Greek: proxenia). It enables this material to be used to visualise the highly-fragmented political geography of the ancient world during the Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods, and to get a sense of how densely and intensely interconnected were the states which made it up.

QuarryScapes Atlas

The QuarryScapes Atlas displays a variety of ancient quarry landscapes. The purpose of the atlas is first of all to show the great variability of such landscapes and introducing them with photos and few words. The atlas will be further developed, and hopefully evolve to a comprehensive web-book with contributions from many researchers. In this first edition of the atlas we have picked 15 quarry landscapes; most of them in the project region, but also a few outside. Collectively, these 15 sites display a broad range of quarry landscapes; different periods and historical settings, different geology, morphology and climate. Also, they are in different stages of development as cultural heritage sites, from “unknown and remote” to outdoor museums.

Recogito

Recogito is a Web-based tool for annotating place references in early geospatial documents. It is a result of the ongoing Pelagios 3 research project, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This tutorial provides information on how to annotate in Recogito. For general guidance on what to annotate please the Google Doc describing Pelagios Principles.  
Register of Ancient Geographic Entities (RAGE)
A cooperative effort to provide the infrastructure for cross-project placname searches and interactive online mapping applications.
Regnum Francorum Online — interactive maps and sources of early medieval Europe 614-840
This is a website about visualizing early medieval Europe 614-840 on maps. Here you will find interactive maps of the Frankish kingdom, activities of Merovingian and Carolingian kings, donations of the nobility and development of the property of monasteries and other institutions. The locations on the map are clickable and connected to quotes from, and references to primary sources and literature. Simply click on a location and discover which sources are available on this site and on the internet for a particular city. There is an overview of the interactive maps in the Gallery section, intended as a starting point if you are new to this website.
Roman Roads and Milestones in Judaea/Palaestina 
In 1970 The Israel Milestone Committee (IMC) was formed by Mordechai Gichon as a branch of the International Curatorium of the Corpus Miliariorum. The aim of the committee was to assemble, study and prepare for publication the milestones inscriptions found in Israel. The IMC also intended to carry out a systematic survey of all the extant remains related to roads, in order to provide a comprehensive picture of the Roman road network in Israel. For almost 40 years the Committee's field and research work was led by Israel Roll and Benjamin Isaac together with other scholars.
The Romans: From Village to Empire: A History of Rome from Earliest Times to the End of the Western Empire (2nd edition; 2011)
second edition of Mary T. BoatwrightDaniel J. GargolaNoel LenskiRichard J. A. Talbert The Romans: From Village to Empire: A History of Rome from Earliest Times to the End of the Western Empire has appeared from Oxford University Press (2011). The following list provides access to digital (.pdf) versions of the maps that appear in the text. As the files are large, we recommend that you right click the link below the thumbnail and save a local copy..
ROMAQ: The Atlas Project of Roman Aqueducts
Roman aqueducts are amongst the most impressive and interesting structures that have survived from the Ancient World. Although aqueduct bridges such as the Pont du Gard are best known, roman aqueducts are complex water supply line systems that are impressive feats of engineering even by today's standards. Some of the aqueducts are simple water channels, but many contain complex structures such as inverted siphons, tunnels, basins and drop shafts while the channels themselves can be up to 240 km in length. Over 1400 roman aqueducts have been described in the Mediterranean basin and the aim of this website is to present the available corpus of literature on the subject in a systematic way. Besides available literature on each aqueduct, we aim to present summarised data on each aqueduct. However, this is a project in development, and it will take time to add new data and publications, and to update content.
Rome’s World: The Peutinger Map Reconsidered
The Peutinger Map is the only map of the Roman world to come down to us from antiquity. An elongated object full of colorful detail and featuring land routes across Europe, North Africa, and the Near East, it was mysteriously rediscovered around 1500 and then came into the ownership of Konrad Peutinger, for whom it is named. Today it is among the treasures of the Austrian National Library in Vienna. Richard J. A. Talbert’s Rome’s World: The Peutinger Map Reconsidered offers a long overdue reinterpretation and appreciation of the map as a masterpiece of both mapmaking and imperial Roman ideology...
Stanford Digital Forma Urbis Romae Project
This site is dedicated to exploring the Forma Urbis Romae, or Severan Marble Plan of Rome. This enormous map, measuring ca. 18.10 x 13 meters (ca. 60 x 43 feet), was carved between 203-211 CE and covered an entire wall inside the Templum Pacis in Rome. It depicted the groundplan of every architectural feature in the ancient city, from large public monuments to small shops, rooms, and even staircases. For more information about the map itself, go to the Map page.
The Syriac Gazetteer

Editors: Thomas A. Carlson (Princeton University) and David A. Michelson (Vanderbilt University)
The Syriac Gazetteer is a geographical reference work of Syriaca.org for places relevant to Syriac studies. It is growing from an initial publication of over two thousand place records.
TerraWatchers: Crowd Sourced Satellite Image Analysis
TerraWatchers is dedicated to providing web-based, crowdsourced satellite image monitoring and overwatch tools for critical missions related to current events. We use interactive Google Maps© interfaces to display the latest freely available, high-resolution satellite imagery in our mission footprints.

Theban Mapping Project 
Since its inception in 1978, the Theban Mapping Project (TMP, now based at the American University in Cairo) has been working to prepare a comprehensive archaeological database of Thebes. With its thousands of tombs and temples, Thebes is one of the world's most important archaeological zones. Sadly, however, it has not fared well over the years. Treasure-hunters and curio-seekers plundered it in the past; pollution, rising ground water, and mass-tourism threaten it in the present. Even early archaeologists destroyed valuable information in their search for museum-quality pieces.

Today, however, we realize that the monuments of Thebes are a finite resource. If we fail to protect and monitor them, they will vanish, and we and our descendants will all be the poorer. The TMP believes that the first and most essential step in preserving this heritage is a detailed map and database of every archaeological, geological, and ethnographic feature in Thebes. Only when these are available can sensible plans be made for tourism, conservation, and further study.

During the last decade, the TMP has concentrated on the Valley of the Kings. Modern surveying techniques were used to measure its tombs. From the data collected, the TMP is preparing 3-D computer models of the tombs. And of course, the TMP is continuing its excavation of KV 5. For the TMP staff, sharing their work with the interested public is just as important as what they do in the field. This has been done through a series of publications and this growing website.
 Theban Tombs Satellite Mapping Project
Welcome to the Theban Tombs Satellite Mapping Project! The map is designed to be an interactive experience for users. You will be able to zoom in and out, view information about buildings and parking lots, and print out findings. This menu is to help you to understand the functions of the map in order to provide a more fulfilling experience!
al-Thurayyā Gazetteer, Ver. 02

This is our first usable demo of al-Thurayyā Gazetteer. Currently it includes over 2,000 toponyms and almost as many route sections georeferenced from Georgette Cornu’s Atlas du monde arabo-islamique à l'époque classique: IXe-Xe siècles (Leiden: Brill, 1983). The gazetteer is searchable (upper left corner), although English equivalents are not yet included; in other words, look for Dimashq/دمشق, not Damascus.
Traveling with Pausanias: Using Google Earth to Engage Students with Ancient Maps
John Gruber-Miller
December 14th, 2012
There are several files available: Rivers of Pausanias Book 5 (including the rivers of Arcadia, and the Jordan River), Cataracts of the Nile, and Olympic winners named in Pausanias 5.8-9 and their hometowns. To download the .KMZ files (in a compressed/ZIP folder), please click here.
Trismegistos Places (GEO and GEOREF
Currently 30495 place records (GEO) and 117663 place attestation records (GEOREF).
A database of places related to the ancient world
by Trismegistos

 
Based on the foundations of the Fayum Project (Graeco-Roman Egypt) of the KULeuven and the project Multilingualism and Multiculturalism in Graeco-Roman Egypt of Cologne University.
Unlocking historic landscapes in the eastern Mediterranean
Jim Crow (University of Edinburgh) and Sam Turner (Newcastle University), 2010

In many areas of the Eastern Mediterranean there are landscapes exhibiting exceptional time-depth, where the historic landscape is made up of visible features from many different periods. Our research adapted and used a new technique developed in Britain (Historic Landscape Characterisation - HLC) for the first time in the eastern Mediterranean to study these landscapes. HLC is a method for mapping the landscape that can be used to interpret how and when different elements were created. Using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) we integrated data from historical, archaeological and other sources to create detailed, long-term landscape histories of two case-studies areas.
Vici.org: Archaeological Atlas of Antiquity
Vici.org is the archaeological atlas of classical antiquity. It is a community driven archaeological map, inspired by and modelled after Wikipedia.
The first version of Vici.org went online in May 2012. It was preceded by a sister website Omnesviae.org, a roman routeplanner based on the Peutinger map. Since its start, Vici.org has grown a lot. At the time to this writing, over 140 contributors have added nearly 20,000 locations, approximately 1,000 line tracings and over 3,000 images.
Virtual Cilicia Project
Surrounded by the steep Taurus and Amanus mountain ranges, the fertile alluvial plain of Cilicia Pedias in modern Turkeyis a true treasury of important monuments from numerous ages. Hittite and Assyrian rock reliefs serve as representations of power at this connection between Anatoliaand the Levant. Since it relies on Goggle Earth, the Virtual Cilicia Project is able to show you these monuments as well as the ruins of Bronze and Iron Age settlements like e.g. Karatepe with its world-famous carved orthostats in their natural environments.

The West Bank and East Jerusalem Searchable Map
This collection includes lists of archaeological sites that have been surveyed or excavated since Israel occupied the West Bank and East Jerusalem in 1967. Since that time, the oversight of the antiquities of the area has devolved on two government bodies: the military administration's Staff Officer for Archaeology (SOA) in Judea and Samaria and the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA). The IAA, which is responsible for East Jerusalem, is a civil branch of government and its records are open for inspection. Some of the records of the Staff Officer for Archaeology in Judea and Samaria are being accessed in full for the first time as a result of the joint Israeli-Palestinian Archaeology Working Group. This involved a team of Israeli and a team of Palestinian archaeologists and cultural heritage professionals working in concert to create new data resources that document the single, unitary archaeological landscape of the southern Levant, which is now bisected by the modern borders.
 Women of ASOR Map
The “Women of ASOR” Map will act as a networking resource for ASOR’s membership, as it displays the locations of professional female members around the globe – pinpointing the universities, museums or other organizations where they work and the sites at which they excavate...
World Atlas of Language Structures (WALS)
The World Atlas of Language Structures (WALS) is a large database of structural (phonological, grammatical, lexical) properties of languages gathered from descriptive materials (such as reference grammars) by a team of 55 authors (many of them the leading authorities on the subject).

Open Access Ancient Language Textbooks and Primers

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[Most recently updated 2 January 2016]

Open Access Textbooks and Language Primers relating to the ancient world
Additional resources of thus type are accessible through the  Less Commonly Taught Languages (LCTLs) Project pages at the University of Minnesota.

And see also Lexicity
And see also  Smarthistory, a "multi-media web-book designed as a dynamic enhancement (or even substitute) for the traditional art history textbook"

Textkit has a huge library of Greek and Latin textbooks

Learn Ancient Greek


Listed below is Textkit’s entire collection of Ancient Greek textbooks. All books are made available for full and free download in PDF format.

Greek Answer Keys

First Greek Book Key, John Williams White
First Greek Writer Key, Arthur Sidgwick
Greek Prose Composition Key, North and Hillard

Greek Composition Textbooks

First Greek Writer, Arthur Sidgwick
Greek Prose Composition, North and Hillard
Selections from the Septuagint, Conybeare and Stock

Greek Lexicon/Dictionary

Greek Reading Text

Greek Reference Grammars

Greek Grammar, William W. Goodwin
Greek Grammar, Herbert Weir Smyth

Greek Textbooks

A First Greek Course, Sir William Smith
First Greek Book, John Williams White
First Greek Grammar Accidence, W. Gunion Rutherford
First Greek Grammar Syntax, W. Gunion Rutherford

Learn Latin



Listed below is Textkit’s entire collection of Latin textbooks. All books are made available for full and free download in PDF format.

Latin Answer Keys


Latin for Beginner’s Key, Benjamin L. D’Ooge

Latin Prose Composition Key, North and Hillard

Latin Composition Textbooks


A New Latin Prose Composition, Charles E. Bennett

Latin Prose Composition, North and Hillard

Latin Reading Text


Caesar’s Civil War in Latin, Charles E. Moberly



Cicero Select Orations, Benjamin L. D’Ooge







Selections From Ovid, Allen & Greenough

The Phormio of Terence in Latin, Fairclough and Richardson

Latin Reference Grammars


A Latin Grammar, Charles E. Bennett

New Latin Grammar, Allen & Greenough

Latin Textbooks


Beginner’s Latin Book, Collar and Daniell

Latin For Beginners, Benjamin L. D’Ooge

    Do you know of others? Do you use any of these in your teaching? Are you developing open access textbooks in any area of ancient world studies? Please respond by clicking the Comments button.

    Open Access Journal: Egiptología 2.0

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    Egiptología 2.0
    ISSN: 2444-6254
    Egiptología 2.0
    Egiptología 2.0 es una revista on-line gratuita y sin ánimo de lucro de carácter egiptológico.

    Su periodicidad es trimestral y tiene como objetivo compartir y divulgar de forma didáctica y amena el arte, la historia y la cultura del antiguo Egipto, publicando las noticias de relevancia, artículos de investigación, estudio de piezas, información sobre exposiciones, eventos, novedades editoriales… etc.

    Hierakonpolis: City of the Hawk

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    Hierakonpolis: City of the Hawk










    Hierakonpolis, the City of the Hawk, ancient Egyptian Nekhen, is one of the most important archaeological sites for understanding the foundations of ancient Egyptian society.
    Best known as the home of the ceremonial Palette of Narmer, one of the first political documents in history, and attributed to the first king of the First Dynasty at about 3100BC, the site contains far more.

    Well before the construction of the pyramids, Hierakonpolis was one of the largest urban centers along the Nile -- a vibrant, bustling city containing many of the features that would later come to typify Dynastic Egyptian civilization. Stretching for over 3 km along the edge of the Nile flood plain, already by 3600 BC it was a city of many neighborhoods and quarters.


    Holbo, John, and Belle Waring. Reason & persuasion: three dialogues by Plato : Euthyphro, Meno, Republic book 1.

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    Holbo, John, and Belle Waring. Reason & persuasion: three dialogues by Plato : Euthyphro, Meno, Republic book 1. Singapore: Prentice Hall.
    Reason and Persuasion contains three Plato dialogues - Euthyphro, Meno, Republic Book I - translated by Belle Waring; with extensive commentary and illustrations by John Holbo. It is suitable as an introductory textbook but we hope more advanced students of philosophy and Plato will get something out of it as well. The 4th edition is substantially revised and improved.

    "There is no dearth of textbooks offering an introduction to Plato's thought, but Holbo's stands apart in the scope of its introductory material and its user-friendly style ... The colloquial yet accurate translation by Belle Waring serves to reduce the distance between the student and the world of the dialogues still further ...Holbo's commentaries on these three dialogues serve to situate them both as individual works and also as parts of Plato's overall project of showing the problems of persuasion divorced from reason. Rather than taking a strictly scholarly approach the author has made clear the relevance of these texts for questions even non-philosophers should find worth asking. For instructors seeking an introductory text for first time readers of Plato, Holbo's book is worthy of consideration."
    Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews, review of the 3rd edition.

    Administrative: Happy New Year

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    As the new year begins and the seventh anniversary of the establishment of AWOL approaches (on 6th January), I'd like to take a moment to thank those of you who have contributed links to open access scholarship on the ancient world, or who have contributed in other ways. I look forward to continuing feedback from users on how AWOL might be improved or changed.  You may contact me via the comment function that is at the bottom of each page, or directly via social media, email (cejo at uchicago dot edu) or even by post.

    It seems worthy of note that as a moment ago AWOL had received 5,737,798 page views. 3,737,798 of these have been within the last three years. Traffic in December 2016 fell just short of 200,000 page views as did two of the summer month in 2016. I am at a loss to explain these outliers. "Normal" traffic hovers around the 100,000 page views per month level.

    In the right hand side bar of AWOL is a form allowing you to receive notifications of updates to AWOL by email. This seems useful for those for whom news feeds are not. Your address will be safe. Neither AWOL nor feedburner will send spam. Since I announced this feature in June 2009, 7,796 e-mail addresses have subscribed to AWOL.

    If you are reading this in a newsreader or on facebook or twitter (or other social media) you will have to click through to see the form in the sidebar. If you are reading this by email you have already done what's required. The software requires a confirmation of your request to join. If you don't see such a confirmation request, check your spam folder.

    Instructions for unsubscribing from the email list are at the bottom of each message from AWOL.

    If you are not reading this on on facebook or twitter you are welcome to join in there.

    You are invited to visit The AWOL Index

    This publication systematically describes ancient-world information resources on the world-wide web. The bibliographic data presented herein has been programmatically extracted from the content of AWOL - The Ancient World Online (ISSN 2156-2253) and formatted in accordance with a structured data model. In continuous operation since 2009, AWOL is a blog authored by Charles E. Jones, Tombros Librarian for Classics and Humanities at the Pattee Library, Penn State University

    This publication, The AWOL Index, is an experimental project, developed jointly by Jones and Tom Elliott, the Associate Director for Digital Programs at New York University's Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW), with the assistance of Pavan Atri, Roger Bagnall, Dawn Gross, Sebastian Heath, Gabriel McKee, Ronak Parpani, David Ratzan, and Kristen Soule.

    Creation of The AWOL Index was made possible by a grant from the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation.

    Open Access Journal: Revista Numismática Hécate

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    [First posted in AWOL 25 December 2015, updated 3 January 2017]

    Revista Numismática Hécate
    ISSN: 2386-8643
    http://www.revista-hecate.org/files/6914/0061/5046/logo.jpg

    ¡Bienvenidos todos a la nueva revista de numismática Hécate!

    La revista Hécate debe su nombre a la diosa griega tricéfala, que representa las diferentes formas de entender el mundo y el ser humano en su necesidad de transmitir Historia. Así Hécate nos muestra una encrucijada de conocimientos, de nuevos caminos y tendencias que debemos recorrer; senderos que nos llevarán a comprender y abordar el saber desde una perspectiva libre y globalizadora en esta nueva época de cambio y tecnología.
    Número 3 (2016)
    ARTÍCULOS
    Figura femenina en una moneda de dos litras y media de Siracusa: análisis y estudio de su iconografíaPuebla Morón, José Miguel (pp. 1-11)
    Monedas de Ptolomeo III a nombre de la ‘Reina Berenice’
    Salgado, Damián R. (pp. 12-26)
    El toro en las monedas de Ybshm/Ebusus: Una posible interpretación de su significado
    Blanco, Santiago (pp. 27-34)
    La ceca de Iltukoite
    Amela Valverde, Luis (pp. 35-41)
    Carteia, estudio de «la moneda del pescador»Portillo Sotelo, José Luis (pp. 42-54)
    Turiaso: sus monedas augusteas y tiberianas
    Amela Valverde, Luis (pp. 55-78)

    Nuevas perspectivas numismáticas en torno a la promoción del Municipium Vrbs Victrix Osca
    Aguilera Hernández, Alberto (pp. 79-95)
    Las primeras emisiones de Emporiae
    Amela Valverde, Luis (pp. 96-110)
    Monedas de 4 nummi anónimas, tipo cruz/delta: Una ceca bizantina en Carthago Spartaria
    Rodríguez Gavilá, Germán (pp. 111-120)
    Simboli nuovi e simboli antichi sui contorniatiMondello, Cristian (pp. 121-136)
    Los dinares bilingües de al-Andalus y el MagrebAriza Armada, Almudena (pp. 137-158)
    Labras de un Rey Cruzado por Cristo: Alfonso I, el Batallador (1104-1134). Acuñaciones Castellano-Leonesas y Navarro-AragonesasMozo Monroy, Manuel (pp. 159-185)
    Una variante desconocida en el tesorillo de OtazaSánchez Rincón, Raúl (pp. 186-189)
    Contramarcas privadas de valor en moneda castellana al final del s. XVRoma Valdés, Antonio (pp. 190-200)
    La moneda circulante en el archipiélago canario durante el siglo XVIIICano Borrego, Pedro Damián (pp. 201-214)
    Determinación del precio de las 25 pesetas de Alfonso XII comunesSantos, Juan Luis (pp. 215-226)
    Peso medio y tolerancia de las monedas de 100 pesetas de 1966Santos, Juan Luis (pp. 227-236)
    RECENSIONES

    Número 2


    ARTÍCULOS

    Análisis iconográfico de las monedas de Alejandro Magno y los DiádocosGarcía García, Cristina (pp. 1-52)
    A raíz de un divisor argénteo de probable atribución a Malaka aparecido junto a un tartemorion gaditano en Cástulo
    Martínez Chico, David (pp. 53-59)
    Eusti/Eustibaikula, una ceca del interior catalán
    Amela Valverde, Luis (pp. 60-70)
    De nuevo sobre la serie RRC 235 de SEX•POM
    Amela Valverde, Luis (pp. 71-85)
    Tres posibles nuevas variantes inéditas de moneda provincial hispana depositadas en el Museo de CuencaGozalbes García, Helena (pp. 86-92)
    Las monedas de bronce de Cn. Pompeyo hijo y Sexto Pompeyo (RRC 471/1, 478/1 Y 479/1)
    Amela Valverde, Luis (pp. 93-118)

    La enigmática figura de Suniefredo a la luz de sus emisiones monetales
    Castillo Lozano, José Ángel  (pp. 119-124)
    Learn to differentiate nine jitals
    Palomares Bueno, Francisco (pp. 125-146)
    Hipótesis sobre un morabetino de oro inédito de Enrique I de Castilla
    Mozo Monroy, Manuel (pp. 147-174)
    La circulación de la moneda española en el norte de África y Levante en la Edad ModernaCano Borrego, Pedro Damián (pp. 175-188)

    RECENSIONES
    Chaves Tristán, Francisca y Pliego Vázquez, Ruth: “Bellum et argentum. La Segunda Guerra púnica en Iberia y el conjunto de monedas y plata de Villarrubia de Los Ojos (Ciudad Real)”. Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, 2015.López Sánchez, Fernando (pp. 189-191)
    Guest, Peter S. W.: “The Late Roman Gold and Silver Coins from the Hoxne Treasure”. The British Museum Press, Londres, 2005.González García, Alberto (pp. 192-196)
    Cunietti-Ferrando, Arnaldo: “La Casa de Moneda de Potosí durante las Guerras de la Independencia”. Academia Nacional de la Historia, Buenos Aires, 2014.
    Blanco, Santiago (pp. 197-198)
    Paoletti, Emilio y Woolson, María Allessandra: “Re-engraving assayer’s initials in Potosi cobs”. Editorial Dunken, Buenos Aires, 2014.
    Blanco, Santiago (pp. 199-200)

    Número 1

    AWOL's list of Open Access Ancient Numismatics Journals
      
    AWOL's List of

    Open Access Monograph Series: California Classical Studies

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    [First posted in AWOL 7 August 2013, updated 3 January 2017]

    California Classical Studies
    http://calclassicalstudies.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/CCS_logo_masthead2.jpg
    California Classical Studies publishes peer-reviewed long-form scholarship with online open access and print-on-demand availability. The primary aim of the series is to disseminate basic research (editing and analysis of primary materials both textual and physical), data-heavy research, and highly specialized research of the kind that is either hard to place with the leading publishers in Classics or extremely expensive for libraries and individuals when produced by a leading academic publisher. In addition to promoting archaeological publications, papyrological and epigraphic studies, technical textual studies, and the like, the series will also produce selected titles of a more general profile.
    Submissions (in English) are invited from all, and no affiliation with the University of California is required. For more information, please visit the CCS website at http://calclassicalstudies.org.

    Print On Demand copies of CCS books are available at:
    http://escholarship-california_classical_studies.lulu.com/spotlight/

    There are 4 publications in this collection, published between 2013 and 2016.
    cover_thumbnail
    Kotwick, Mirjam E.: Alexander of Aphrodisias and the Text of Aristotle's Metaphysics, 2016
    Abstract: Alexander of Aphrodisias’s commentary (about AD 200) is the earliest extant commentary on Aristotle’s Metaphysics, and it is the most valuable indirect witness to the Metaphysics text and its transmission. Mirjam Kotwick’s study is a...
    cover_thumbnail
    Griffith, Mark: Greek Satyr Play: Five Studies, 2015
    Abstract: With a new introduction and some revisions, these essays on Classical Greek satyr plays, originally published in various venues between 2002 and 2010, suggest new critical approaches to this important dramatic genre and identify previously...
    cover_thumbnail
    Courtney, Edward: A Commentary on the Satires of Juvenal, 2013
    Abstract: Edward Courtney's study of the Satires of Juvenal is the only full-scale commentary on the corpus since the nineteenth century and retains its value for students and scholars a generation after its first appearance in...
    cover_thumbnail
    Kurke, Leslie: The Traffic in Praise: Pindar and the Poetics of Social Economy, 2013
    Abstract: Pindar’s epinikian odes were poems commissioned to celebrate athletic victories in the first half of the fifth century BCE. Drawing on the insights of interpretive anthropology and cultural history, Leslie Kurke investigates how the socially...


    Open Access Journal: Arabian Epigraphic Notes: An Open Access Online Journal on Arabian Epigraphy

    Interrelaciones e identidades culturales en el Cercano Oriente Antiguo

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    Interrelaciones e identidades culturales en el Cercano Oriente Antiguo / Roxana Flammini ... [et al.] ; editado por Roxana Flammini ; Juan Manuel Tebes. - 1a ed . - Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires : IMHICIHU - Instituto Multidisci- plinario de Historia y Ciencias Humanas, 2016.
    Libro digital, PDF
    Archivo Digital: descarga y online ISBN 978-987-46360-1-0 
    A más de 40 años de su nacimiento, las aproximaciones desde los sistemas-mundo y los enfoques de los vínculos centro-periferia proveen aún un marco adecuado para el análisis de interrelaciones políticas, económicas y culturales de toda índole, tanto en la modernidad como en el mundo antiguo. Aunque esta teoría fue inicialmente postulada para explicar la emergencia del capitalismo en el mundo moderno, revisiones posteriores aglutinadas bajo el rótulo de “análisis de sistemas-mundo” incorporaron el estudio de las sociedades pre-modernas, y muy especialmente de las interrelaciones e identidades culturales emergentes en ellas. En este libro, un grupo de investigación interdisciplinario examina diversos estudios de caso de las sociedades del antiguo Cercano Oriente, desde Egipto y el Levante hasta Anatolia y Creta, desde el 4to al 1er milenio a.C., enfocándose en las relaciones interregionales a diversas escalas y en cómo afectaron la vida cotidiana de los pueblos implicados en ellas. El libro contribuye, por un lado, a responder de modo original preguntas históricas significativas sobre las interrelaciones y las identidades culturales que emergieron en momentos clave de la historia del antiguo Cercano Oriente (¿Cuándo se originaron? ¿Qué elementos se transfirieron? ¿Cómo influyeron en las comunidades contemporáneas? ¿Cuáles son las particularidades de tales identidades?) y, por el otro, al debate mucho más amplio acerca del papel desempeñado por los intercambio en el desarrollo de la complejidad social en las sociedades pre-modernas.

    Glassware and Ceramic Museum of Iran

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    Glassware and Ceramic Museum of Iran
    The premises that have been turned into museum where glass and clay works are on display were built about 90 years ago upon orders of Ahmad Qavam(Qavam-ol-Saltaneh) for his personal lodging (residence and working office). The building is situated in a garden with a span of 7000 square meters and was used by Qavam himself till the year 1953. 

    Later, the building were sold to the Egyptians as the new premises for the embassy of Egypt and remained in their possession for seven years. When relations were strained between Iran and Egypt at the time of Abdul Nasser and subsequent to the closure of the Egyptian embassy in Iran, the Commercial Bank purchased the building. 


    However, it was sold to Farah Pahlavi’s bureau in 1976 and was turned into a museum by three groups of Iranian, Austrian and French architects. The museum was opened in 1980 and was registered in the list of national heritage in 1998. 


    The main establishment of the museum that occupies an area of 1040 square meters is a two-storey octagonal building with suspended pillars and a basement. It is situated on the entrance side of the premises. The architectural style of the building is a combination of the traditional Iranian style and the European architecture of the 19th century. 


    The first floor is connected to the second one through wooden steps in Russian style. Prior to the time when the building was transferred into the Egyptian embassy, the entrance of the museum was doomed-shaped but was later flattened. 


    Parts of the walls in the basement are decorated in traditional style with big tiles. Double windows have been used in the architecture of the building instead of terrace and wooden doors have been installed behind the windowpanes in order to regulate the light and temperature of the interior of the building. The exterior and interior of the museum comprise such decorations as brick works, plaster works, mirror works and inlaid works.


     
     
     
     

    Online Greek Coinage: An international project to build a Typology of the coinage of the Ancient World

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    Online Greek Coinage: An international project to build a Typology of the coinage of the Ancient World
    The discipline of Greek numismatics is traditionally conceived as covering the coinage produced from Spain in the West to the Indus in the East, from the origins of coinage in the 7th century BC, to the reduction of the last great Hellenistic kingdom in 31 BC.  It is almost easier to define this disparate mass of coinage by what it does not include: anything produced by the state of Rome, or tinged by the antiquarian notion of the Celt. The idea that this world was Greek is clearly false, but the discipline has organised itself around this signifier, partly because scholars tend to consider coinage as a Greek invention, adopted by neighbouring peoples as a Greek concept. That idea can be debated but it is the backbone of the discipline: the geographical classification of Greek coinage has been adopted by all major collections and is an international system relevant for an international typology.  Our project then, almost ineluctably, bears this loaded but useful term, and we begin with the aim to cover the territory adopted by Barclay Head with his Historia Numorum.

    But there the similarity ends. Online Greek Coinage (OGC) is emphatically not a handbook, nor intended to provide a guide to the coinage of this time or these places. It is a reference database intended to provide a systematized account of all types of coinage produced within its purview, and rooted in the digital world of the 21st century.  It is intended to be readable by humans and machines.  It will provide a classical typology of coin types online, identified by a series of stable http-addressable URIs for every distinct issue of Greek coinage.  For these URIs will be provided basic descriptive information expressed in RDF. And for each issue, links will be provided to information about individual specimens of that issue.  The Typology will seek to guarantee inclusion of specimens from a series of core collections (in major public institutions) and core resources (such as Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum and the Inventory of Greek Coin Hoards).  Where possible and desirable it will also include information on specimens from non-core collections (including private collections), excavations and commerce...

    Rome Research Group: Exploring Romeʻs Past

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    Rome Research Group: Exploring Romeʻs Past
    The Rome Research Group is a collection of projects involved in exploring various features of the city of Rome and the world it influenced. Working broadly in the world of the Digital Humanities, current projects are mapping the street shrines (edicole sacre) of Rome, built beginning in the Medieval period, and the temples of the ancient Roman world.

    Digital Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum (DFHG)

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    Digital Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum (DFHG)
    The Digital Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum (DFHG) is a project directed by Monica Berti at the Alexander von Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig for producing the digital version of the five volumes of the Fragmenta Historicorum Graecorum (FHG) edited by Karl Müller in the 19th century.
    The FHG consists of a survey of excerpts from many different sources pertaining to more than 600 Greek fragmentary historians. Excluding the first volume, authors are chronologically distributed and cover a period of time from the 6th century BC through the 7th century CE. Fragments are numbered sequentially and arranged according to works and book numbers, when these pieces of information are available in the source texts preserving the fragments. Almost every Greek fragment is translated or summarized into Latin.
    The first volume includes also the text of the Marmor Parium with Latin translation, chronological table and commentary, and the Greek text of the Rosetta Stone (Marmor Rosettanum) with a French literal translation as well as a critical, historical and archaeological commentary. The fifth volume comprises a section with French translations of fragments of Greek and Syriac historians preserved in Armenian sources.
    The digital versions of FHG vol. 1 (9.4 MB), FHG vol. 2 (8 MB), and FHG vol. 3 (10 MB) are now available online. They collect fragments of authors from the 6th century BC through the 2nd century CE, including Apollodorus of Athens (with fragments of the Bibliotheca), historians of Sicily (Antiochus of Syracuse, Philistus of Syracuse, Timaeus of Tauromenius), the Atthidographers (Clidemus, Phanodemus, Androtio, Demo, Philochorus, and Ister), Aristotle and his disciples, and historians from the time of Alexander the Great until 306 CE. The texts of the Marmor Parium and of the Marmor Rosettanum are online in a seperate appendix at the end of vol. 1.

    New Open Access Journal: Cartagine. Studi e Ricerche

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    Cartagine. Studi e Ricerche
    Testata della pagina 
    Cartagine. Studi e Ricerche (CaSteR) è la rivista internazionale, accademica, peer-reviewed e Open Access, della Società Scientifica Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Cartagine (SAIC).

    Ambito e orizzonte culturale

    L'ambito culturale della rivista è quello delle scienze storiche, archeologiche e dell’antichità, della storia dell’arte, della conservazione, della valorizzazione e del restauro dei beni culturali. L'ambito cronologico di riferimento va dalla preistoria fino al periodo fatimide (XII sec.) mentre dal punto di vista geografico l'area di elezione è quella dell'Africa del Nord (in particolare Tunisia e paesi del Maghreb) intesa sia come spazio geografico fisico che come termine culturale di raffronto per studi che trattino di aspetti comuni ad altre aree e di rapporti di interscambio culturale e materiale. Particolare attenzione verrà inoltre riservata agli studi che tratteranno di aspetti collegati alla musealizzazione, al restauro dei monumenti, alle tematiche collegate alla valorizzazione dei giacimenti culturali materiali e immateriali.

    Scopo

    La rivista si propone di incoraggiare, negli ambiti sopra identificati, la ricerca interdisciplinare sull'area nord Africana ed in particolare in Tunisia proponendosi come un contenitore di scambio e confronto non solo tra i componenti della comunità accademica degli specialisti di settore ma, superando i confini nazionali, tra le diverse comunità accademiche e la società civile.

    Tipo di documenti editi

    I contenuti della rivista saranno principalmente testi a stampa corredati da immagini fotografiche, disegni in vari formati (raster e vettoriali), filmati video e file contenenti dati testuali. Potranno essere inoltre sottoposti alla valutazione di CaSteR per l'edizione anche lavori multimediali purché rigorosamente a carattere scientifico e di ambito cronologico, geografico e culturale assolutamente coerente con le linee editoriali sopra esposte.

    N. 1 (2016)

    Sommario

    Editoriale


    Antonio M. Corda

    Saggi e studi

    Paolo Bernardini
    Enrique Gozalbes
    Piero Bartoloni

    Conferenze, seminari e sedute scientifiche della SAIC

    Jafaar Ben Nasr, Tarek Ben Fraj, Ridha Boussoffara, Nouri Boukhchim, Marwa Marnaoui, Sahbi Jaouadi, Paolo Anagnostou, Emanuele Cancellieri, Marco Carpentieri, Giovanni Destro Bisol, Enrico Lucci, Savino di Lernia
    Alessandro Naso
    Michele Guirguis
    Nabil Kallala, Gilberto Montali
    Antonio Ibba, Alessandro Teatini
    Sergio Ribichini

    Notizie e resoconti

    Attilio Mastino, Sergio Ribichini, Isabel Rodà de Llanza, Mario Mazza
    Attilio Mastino, Giorgio Rocco

    Recensioni

    Compte rendu du livre de Ouiza Aït Amara, Numides et Maures au combat. États et armées en Afrique du Nord jusqu’à l’époque de Juba Ier, Sandhi: Ortacesus 2014 (=Studi di Storia e Archeologia, 13); 258 p., ill.; ISBN 9788897786153
    Christine Hamdoune
    Compte rendu du livre de Fathi Béjaoui, Les hautes steppes tunisiennes : Témoignages archéologiques chrétiens, Tunis: INP, 2015, 199 p.; ISBN 9789973912886
    Mohammed-Arbi Nsiri
    Recensione del volume di Jeroen W. P. Wijnendaele, The Last of the Romans: Bonifatius - Warlord and comes Africae, Bloomsbury: London - New Delhi - New York - Sydney 2015; 182 p.; ill.; ISBN 9781780937175
    Antonio Ibba

    Credits

    Credits
     

    The Digital Penn Museum

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    The Digital Penn Museum
    Welcome to the Digital Penn Museum, the one stop portal for the vast range of digital content offered by the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology! To access our digital resources, scroll down to browse samples, click thru to explore further, or use the links on the navigation bar above.
    COLLECTIONS

    JSTOR Access for Alumni Program

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    [First posted in AWOL 28 November 2012, updated 5 January 2017]

    Are you currently unaffiliated with a subscribing institution and need access to JSTOR?  See if your University is listed below, if not, contact your alumni association and request that they join the program.

    JSTOR Access for Alumni
    Alumni Access enables institutions to provide their entire alumni network with full access to the high-quality journal collections on JSTOR. JSTOR’s trusted digital library is an essential resource for thousands of colleges and universities worldwide.

    View Extending Access to Scholarly Resources: JSTOR's Alumni Program, a presentation given at CNI's membership meeting.

    Don't see your alma mater among the list of participating institutions? Take a minute to tell us what JSTOR access means to you. We’ll share it with your alma mater.
    The institutions below offer ongoing JSTOR access to their alumni. Click on the institution name for access instructions.

    And see also 
    AWOL's full list of journals in JSTOR with substantial representation of the Ancient World

    Conference - "Astronomy in Past and Present Cultures" (November 2015 - Rome, Italy)

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    Special Issue of MEDITERRANEAN ARCHAELOGY AND ARCHAEOMETRY

    Société Européenne pour l'Astronomie dans la Culture (SEAC 2015) Conference - "Astronomy in Past and Present Cultures" (November 2015 - Rome, Italy)
    Editorial Foreword by Guest Editors
    Afterword
    A - Problems and Methods of Cultural Astronomy

    THE CREDIBILITY OF ARCHAEOASTRONOMY: A SUGGESTION FROM PHARMACOLOGY? (pp.1-5)
    V. F. Polcaro
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.207248




    LOOKING THROUGH A TELESCOPE WITH AN OBSIDIAN MIRROR. COULD SPECIALISTS OF ANCIENT CULTURES HAVE BEEN ABLE TO VIEW THE NIGHT SKY USING SUCH AN INSTRUMENT? (pp.7-15)
    J. Vit, M. A. Rappengluck
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.207255




    OPEN-SOURCE VIRTUAL ARCHAEOASTRONOMY (pp.17-24)
    G. Zotti
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.207260




    PHENOMENOLOGY OF SHADOW (pp.25-32)
    D. Brown
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.207269




    SKYSCAPES OF CLIFTON (pp.33-39)
    R. Mukundu, W. Ktorides, D. Brown
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.207285





    B - Astronomy in Extra-European Cultures

    ANOTHER LOOK AT THE LUNAR SERIES AT DOS PILAS, GUATEMALA (pp.41-49)
    S. Iwaniszewski
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220897




    ANIMISM, RECIPROCITY AND ENTANGLEMENT (pp.51-58)
    J. McKim Malville
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220898




    THE CROSSOVER AMONG THE INCAS IN THE COLLASUYU (pp.59-66)
    R. Moyano
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220900




    DISARTICULATED DUAL SEASONS AND MAYA COSMOLOGY IN HIGHLAND MAYA COMMUNITIES (pp.67-74)
    N. Louanna Furbee, R. Jimenez Jimenez
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220901




    BASIS OF A GNOMONIC PARADIGM IN MESOAMERICA: THE CASE OF MAYAPAN (pp.75-80)
    R. Perez-Enriquez, J. Galindo Trejo
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220902




    |XAM SKYLORE OF THE KAROO DESERT, SOUTH AFRICA (pp.81-86)
    J. Holbrook, J. M. de Prada-Samper
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220903




    ASTRAL SCIENCE OF THE EAST SYRIAC CHRISTIANS IN CHINA DURING THE LATE FIRST MILLENNIUM AD (pp.87-92)
    B. M. Mak
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220904





    C - Astronomy in Ancient Near East and Egypt, from the origins to 395 CE

    ORIENTATIO AD SIDERA (OAS): HIGHLIGHTS OF A DECADE OF ARCHAEOASTRONOMICAL RESEARCH IN THE MEDITERRANEAN REGION AND BEYOND (pp.93-101)
    J. A. Belmonte, A. C. Gonzalez-Garcia, A. Polcaro, A. Rodriguez-Anton, M. Shaltout
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220905




    THE SKY FROM THE HIGH TERRACE: STUDY ON THE ORIENTATION OF THE ZIQQURAT IN ANCIENT MESOPOTAMIA (pp.103-108)
    D. Nadali, A. Polcaro
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220907




    PLEIADES IN ANCIENT MESOPOTAMIA (pp.109-117)
    L. Verderame
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220909




    THE KUDURRUS AND THE SKY. ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF THE DOG-SCORPION-LAMP ASTRAL PATTERN AS REPRESENTED IN KASSITE KUDURRUS RELIEFS (pp.119-123)
    S. Pizzimenti
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220910




    SHRINES OF RAM-HEADED DIVINITIES AND CANOPUS: SKYSCAPING AT HERAKLEOPOLIS MAGNA (pp.125-132)
    J. A. Belmonte, M. C. Pérez Die, L. Diaz-Iglesias Llanos
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220911




    A DIACHRONIC ANALYSIS OF ORIENTATION OF SACRED PRECINCTS ACROSS JORDAN (pp.133-141)
    A. C. Gonzalez-Garcia, J. A. Belmonte, A. Polcaro
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220912




    EARLY MESOPOTAMIAN INTERCALATION SCHEMES AND THE SIDEREAL MONTH (pp.143-151)
    E. Ratzon
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220913




    ROMANS IN THE NEAR EAST: THE ORIENTATION OF ROMAN SETTLEMENTS IN PRESENT-DAY JORDAN (pp.153-160)
    A. Rodriguez-Anton, J. A. Belmonte, A. C. Gonzalez-Garcia
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220914




    TEMPLES OF ASTARTE ACROSS THE MEDITERRANEAN (pp.161-166)
    C. Esteban, D. Iborra Pellin
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220915




    THE BABYLONIAN ASTRONOMICAL DIARIES: A GRAPHICAL ANALYSIS OF THEIR IMPLIED REFERENCE SYSTEM (pp.167-173)
    S. Gullberg
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220916




    REDISCOVERING THE MALTESE TEMPLE OF BORG IN-NADUR: AN ARCHAEOASTRONOMICAL PERSPECTIVE (pp.175-178)
    D. Tanasi, A. Orlando
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220917





    D - Cultural Astronomy in Ancient Greece

    THE SUN OF HOMER (pp.179-182)
    M. Revello
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220932




    THE MYTH OF IXION: AN ASTRONOMICAL INTERPRETATION (pp.183-189)
    P. Colona
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220933




    ON THE VALUE AND MEANING OF PROCLUS’ PERFECT YEAR (pp.191-194)
    B. Zlatev
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220934





    E - Cultural Astronomy in Ancient Italy and in Roman Empire

    ORIENTATION OF THE SARDINIAN NURAGIC "MEETINGS HUTS" (pp.195-201)
    A. Mulas, M. Peppino Zedda
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220935




    THE ORIENTED ALTARS OF ROCCA PIZZICATA AND THE ROCKY SITES OF ALCANTARA VALLEY (pp.203-206)
    A. Orlando, M. T. Magro, M. S. Scaravilli
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220936




    THE MEGALITHIC TEMPLE OF DIANA ON THE CEFALU ROCK (SICILY) (pp.207-211)
    D. Gori, A. Orlando
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220937




    THE ROLE OF URBAN TOPOGRAPHY IN THE ORIENTATION OF GREEK TEMPLES: THE CASES OF AKRAGAS AND SELINUNTE (pp.213-217)
    R. Hannah, G. Magli, A. Orlando
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220938




    LUNISTICES AT SESTO FIORENTINO: AN INVESTIGATION ON GEOMETRY AND ALIGNMENTS OF THE THOLOS TOMBS OF THE ETRUSCAN PRINCES (pp.219-224)
    F. Carnevale, M. Ranieri
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220939




    A "PHOENICIAN LIGHTHOUSE" AT CAPO GALLO (PALERMO)? (pp.225-231)
    M. Rapisarda, M. Ranieri
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220940




    ON THE ORIENTATION OF TWO ROMAN TOWNS IN THE RHINE AREA (pp.233-240)
    D. Espinosa Espinosa, A. C. Gonzalez-Garcia, M. V. Garcia Quintela
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220941




    THE ORIENTATION OF LUGDUNUM CONUENARUM AND THE CELTIC FEASTS MARKING THE START OF THE SEASONS IN ANCIENT GAUL (pp.241-247)
    A. C. Gonzalez Garcia, M. V. Garcia Quintela, A. Rodriguez Anton
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220942




    THE URBAN SET OF THE PANTHEON AND THE MAUSOLEUM OF AUGUSTUS IN ROME, BETWEEN ARCHITECTURAL AND ASTRONOMICAL SYMBOLISM (pp.249-255)
    L. Nicoletta, P. Virgili
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220943




    THE ORIENTATION OF THE MITHRAEA IN OSTIA ANTICA (pp.257-266)
    S. Sclavi, M. Monaco, F. Carnevale, M. Ranieri, S. Gaudenzi, F. Vito Polcaro, C. Scatigno
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220945




    ARA - PACIS - AVGVSTAE: AN ASTRO-ARCHAEOLOGICAL ANALYSIS (pp.267-274)
    V. R. Tiede
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220946





    F - Cultural Astronomy in Ancient Iberian Peninsula

    PRAILEAITZ I: A MAGDALENIAN LUNAR-SOLAR CAVE AT 15,500 BP IN THE BASQUE COUNTRY (pp.275-282)
    L. Sims, X. Otero
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220947




    ARCHAEOASTRONOMY IN BRONZE AGE SITES OF LA MANCHA (SPAIN) (pp.283-289)
    C. Esteban, L. Benitez-de-Lugo-Enrich
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220948




    LA GESSERA: AN IBERIAN BUILDING FOR WORSHIP? (TARRAGONA, SPAIN) (pp.291-295)
    M. Perez Gutierrez, D. Bea Castano, J. Diloli Fons, J. Vila Llorach, M. Prades Painous
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220949




    EQUINOCTIAL MARKERS IN PROTOHISTORIC IBERIAN SANCTUARIES (pp.297-304)
    C. Esteban
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220950




    AN ORIENTALIZING RITUAL BUILDING IN ALISEDA (CACERES, SPAIN) (pp.305-311)
    M. Perez Gutierrez, A. Rodríguez Díaz, I. Pavon Soldevila, D. M. Duque Espino
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220951




    THE IBERIAN URBAN SANCTUARY OF PUENTE TABLAS (JAEN, SPAIN) (pp.313-319)
    M. Perez Gutierrez, A. Ruiz Rodríguez, M. Molinos Molinos
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220952




    APPLICATION OF CULTURAL ASTRONOMY METHODS TO HIGH SCHOOL BY MEANS OF STUDYING ASTRAL DECORATIONS AND ORIENTATIONS OF GALICIAN HORREOS (pp.321-328)
    F. Brana Rey, A. Ulla Miguel, E. Perez Fernandez
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220953





    G - The Sky Bear

    SKY SIMULATIONS FOR THE PALAEOLITHIC EPOCH (pp.329-334)
    E. Antonello
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220954




    THE BEAR AND THE YEAR: ON THE ORIGIN OF THE FINNISH LATE IRON AGE FOLK CALENDAR AND ITS CONNECTION TO THE BEAR CULT (pp.335-341)
    M. P. Ridderstad
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220955




    SKY BEAR RESEARCH: IMPLICATIONS FOR "CULTURAL ASTRONOMY" (pp.343-350)
    R. M. Frank
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220956





    H - Cultural Astronomy in Ancient Northern Europe

    THE GUNDESTRUP CAULDRON: IS THIS THE KEY TO THE ENIGMA? (pp.351-358)
    C. Maumene
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220957




    THE COMMON ATTRIBUTES BETWEEN THE BALTIC THUNDER GOD PERKUNAS AND HIS ANTIQUE EQUIVALENTS JUPITER AND ZEUS (pp.359-367)
    V. Tumenas
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220958




    ON THE CONSTELLATION ORIGIN OF THE PLACE NAME HINDELOOPEN (pp.369-378)
    E. Amsterdam
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220959




    INTERVISIBILITY, SIGHTLINES AND ALIGNMENTS (pp.379-384)
    C. Clausen
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220960





    I - Cultural Astronomy in Ancient Eastern Europe

    ARMENIAN ARCHAEOASTRONOMY AND ASTRONOMY IN CULTURE (pp.385-392)
    A. Mickaelian, S. Farmanyan
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220961




    ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL COSMOLOGY IN ARMENIAN HIGHLAND (pp.393-399)
    S. V. Farmanyan, A. M. Mickaelian
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220962




    LATE CHALCOLITHIC SOLAR-CHTHONIC ROCK-CUT STRUCTURES FOR TIME MEASURING IN THE EASTERN RHODOPES, BULGARIA (pp.401-406)
    P. Maglova, A. Stoev, M. Spasova
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220963




    RESEARCH PROJECT “ASTRONOMICAL ORIENTATIONS AND GEOPHYSICAL ANOMALIES OF TRAPEZOIDAL NICHES IN THE EASTERN RHODOPES, BULGARIA“: IN SEARCH OF AN INTERNATIONAL PARTNERSHIP (pp.407-412)
    A. Stoev, P. Maglova
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220964




    PREHISTORIC ROCK SANCTUARY WITH ARCH NEAR THE VILLAGE OF KOVACHEVITSA, BULGARIA: SPATIAL ORIENTATION AND SOLAR PROJECTIONS (pp.413-419)
    A. Stoev, P. Maglova, V. Markov, M. Spasova
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220965





    J - Cultural Astronomy in Middle Ages and in Christian Churches

    ASTRONOMY IN THE MEDIEVAL LIBER FLORIDUS (pp.421-428)
    S. Draxler, M. E. Lippitsch
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220966




    AN HYPOTHESIS OF AN ASTRONOMICAL SYSTEM OF LIGURES APUAN IN GARFAGNANA (pp.429-435)
    M. Peppino Zedda
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220967




    SURVEY, ARCHAEOASTRONOMY AND COMMUNICATION: THE MAUSOLEUM OF THEODORIC IN RAVENNA (ITALY) (pp.437-446)
    M. Incerti, G. Lavoratti, S. Iurilli
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220968




    FROM HAGIOGRAPHY TO CELTIC COSMOLOGY: ARCHAEOASTRONOMY AND CHRISTIAN LANDSCAPE IN OURENSE (NW SPAIN) (pp.447-454)
    A. Cesar Gonzalez Garcia, Marco V. Garcia Quintela
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220969




    THE ALIGNMENT OF MEDIEVAL CHURCHES IN NORTHERN-CENTRAL ITALY AND IN THE ALPS AND THE PATH OF LIGHT INSIDE THE CHURCH ON THE PATRON SAINT'S DAY (pp.455-463)
    E. Spinazze
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220970




    ILLUMINATION EFFECTS AT THE CATHEDRAL OF SAINT JAMES (GALICIA): FIRST RESULTS (pp.465-471)
    B. Vilas Estevez, A. C. Gonzalez-García
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220971




    ASTRONOMY AND SOLAR SYMBOLOGY IN THE BASILICA OF SAN MINIATO AL MONTE AND IN THE BAPTISTERY OF SAN GIOVANNI IN FLORENCE (pp.473-480)
    S. Bartolini, M. Pierozzi
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220972




    LIGHT BEAMS AND ARCHITECTURE MARKED CELESTIAL EVENTS IN COLONIAL CHURCHES AND MISSIONS IN NEW SPAIN AND PERU: NEW EVIDENCE FROM MORELIA (pp.481-485)
    R. A. Benfer
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220973





    K - Cultural Astronomy in Renaissance and Modern Epoch

    ASTROLOGY, PROPHECY AND THE BIRTH OF MODERN SCIENCE SEEN THROUGH THE LENSES OF RENAISSANCE ART (pp.487-496)
    G. Gandolfi
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220974




    ASTRONOMY AND CULTURE IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY: ISAAC NEWTON’S INFLUENCE ON THE ENLIGHTENMENT AND POLITICS (pp.497-502)
    N. Campion
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220975




    THE OLD AND THE NEW ROME: FRANCESCO BIANCHINI'S ASTRONOMICAL EXCHANGES WITH THE COURT OF LISBON (pp.503-508)
    L. Tirapicos
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220976





    L - Cultural Astronomy in Contemporary Epoch

    WHERE TELESCOPES CANNOT (YET) SEE - THE MOON AS SEEN BY SCRIVEN BOLTON, ETIENNE TROUVELOT, LUCIEN RUDAUX, CHESLEY BONESTELL (pp.509-517)
    A. Adamo
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220977




    ANALYSING EDUCATION AS A VARIABLE IN "THE SKY IN OUR LIVES SURVEY" (pp.519-524)
    R. Ndlovu
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220978




    ROME IS STAR SHAPED: S.T.A.R. THE FIRST ITALIAN APP FOR THE SPREAD OF CULTURAL ASTRONOMY (pp.525-531)
    M. Chirri, L. Lombardi, L. Ruggiero and L. Fabrizi
    DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.220979

    Old Testament Pseudepigrapha at syri.ac

    0
    0
    Old Testament Pseudepigrapha
    Canon criticism is a field of study ripe for research that has the potential to shine light on interpretive traditions. Both Jewish and Christian groups attempted to reconcile "authoritative" teaching with what they saw and experienced in the world around them. The results of such reconciliation were literary works, spanning from the 3rd century BCE into the 7th century CE, attributed to earlier, authoritative figures. Below is a listing of all works extant in Syriac and Arabic (including Garshuni) from J.-C. Haelewyck, Clavis Apocryphorum Veteris Testamenti (Turnhout: Brepols, 1998). This list does not include apocryphal works commonly found in the manuscripts of the LXX. However, you can find links here for each of these in the Comprehensive Bibliography of Syriac Christianity (Judith, Tobit, I-IV Maccabees, Odes, Wisdom of Solomon, Ecclesiasticus, Baruch, Epistle of Jeremiah, Susanna, Bel and the Dragon).

    Table of Contents

    The Life of Adam and Eve (Apocalypse of Moses) (Arabic)
    The Testament of Adam (Syriac and Arabic)
    The Cave of Treasures (Syriac and Arabic)
    The Conflict of Adam and Eve with Satan (Arabic)
    ​The Book of Adam (Codex Nazaraeus; Mandean Fragment) (Syriac)
    Life of Abel, by Symmachus (Syriac)
    Syriac Book of Seth (Syriac)
    1 Enoch (Syriac)
    Apocalypse of Enoch (Syriac)
    Tractate of Shem (Syriac)
    The Testament of Abraham (On the Death of Abraham) (Arabic)
    History of Melchizedek (Syriac and Arabic)
    Joseph and Asenath (Recension Two) (Syriac)
    History of Joseph (Syriac)
    History of Joseph, Son of Jacob [Version A] (Arabic)
    History of Joseph, Son of Jacob [Version B] (Arabic)
    History of Joseph (Arabic)
    Dormition of Joseph, the Son of Jacob (Arabic)
    Testament of the Twelve Patriarchs (Syriac)
    The Names of the Wives of the Patriarchs (Syriac)
    The Conversation of Moses with God (Syriac and Arabic)
    The Book of Jubilees (Syriac)
    The Life of Moses (Arabic)
    Instruction of David to Solomon (Arabic)
    The Palace of Solomon (Arabic)
    Questions of the Queen of Sheba to Solomon (Syriac)
    Testament of Solomon to Rehoboam his son (Arabic)
    The Final Council of Solomon (Arabic)
    The Death of Solomon (Arabic)
    Aphikia (2 Recensions) (Arabic)
    History of the Rechabites (Syriac and Arabic)
    History of the Prophet Elijah (Arabic)
    History of the Prophet Elijah and the son of the Widow (Arabic)
    ​​History of the Prophet Elijah and his Ascension (Arabic)
    ​​Sermon of Elisha the Prophet on Sinners (Arabic)
    ​​​Sermon of the Prophet Elisha on the necessity of purification (Arabic)
    ​​​Prayer of Manasseh (Syriac and Arabic)
    ​​​Prayer of Manasseh (Cited from the Apostolic Constitutions) (Syriac and Arabic)
    ​​​​Prayer of Manasseh (from the Byzantine Horologion) (Christian Palestinian Aramaic and Syriac)
    ​​​​4 Esdras (The Apocalypse of Ezra) (Syriac and Arabic)
    ​​​​​The Apocalypse of Ezra on the reign of the Arabs (Syriac)
    History and Wisdom of Ahiqar (Syriac and Arabic)
    ​​5 Maccabees (Syriac)
    ​​History of St. Shamuni (Arabic)
    ​​Syriac Apocryphal Psalms (Syriac)
    ​​Odes of Solomon (Syriac)
    ​​History of Job (Arabic)
    ​​Psalms of Solomon (Syriac)
    ​​The Lives of the Prophets (Syriac and Arabic)
    ​​The History of Jonah (Syriac and Arabic)
    ​​Habakkuk Apocryphon (Arabic)
    ​​History of Isaiah the Prophet (Arabic)
    ​​Apocryphon of Jeremiah on the Captivity of Babylon (Arabic)
    Syriac Apocalypse of Baruch (2 Baruch) (Syriac and Arabic)
    Epistle of Baruch (Syriac)
    ​​Apocalypse of Pseudo-Methodius (Syriac and Arabic)
    ​​​On our Lord and on the end written by the youth Daniel (Syriac)
    ​​​Fourteenth Vision of Daniel (Arabic)
    ​​​Apocalypse of Daniel (Arabic)
    On Daniel and the boy Caleb (Arabic)
    Conversation of Joseph and Nebuchadnezzar (Arabic)
    ​​​​The Tiburtine Sibyl (Syriac and Arabic)